Skip to main content

Full text of "Archives from Erech .."

See other formats


PJ372I 

£6D7 









1 ,JI I' 1 ; > i 


VJ37ZI 

E6D7 












GOUCHER COLLEGE CUNEIFORM INSCRIPTIONS. 


Vol. I 


ARCHIVES FROM ERECH 

TIME OF 

NEBUCHADREZZAR AND NABON1DUS 



RAYMOND PHILIP DOUGHERTY, Ph.D. 

PROFESSOR OF BIBLICAL LITERATURE IN GOUCHER COLLEGE 



NEW HAVEN 

PUBLISHED FOR GOUCHER COLLEGE BY 
YALE UNIVERSITY PRESS 

LONDON • HUMPHREY MILFORD • OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS 

MDCCCCXXIII 







PRINTED FOR GODCHER COLLEGE 
BY W. LRUGULIN, LEIPSIC, GERMANY 


GOUCHER COLLEGE 
CUNEIFORM INSCRIPTIONS 
Volume I 


Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2019 with funding from 
Princeton Theological Seminary Library 


https://archive.org/details/archivesfromerec01doug 




PREFATORY NOTE. 


It is a pleasure for me to write this prefatory note, first because Goucher 
College has a Babylonian collection of importance and is able to add this book to 
the sum of those which are making real for us today a very important period of 
ancient history; second, because I am grateful to the men who made it possible to 
secure the Goucher College Babylonian Collection and to give it to the public in 
this scholarly and attractive form. 

Colleges of the size and equipment of Goucher do not ordinarily find them¬ 
selves possessed of so valuable a collection of ancient records. There are but seven 
universities in the United States which own such collections, the more important 
being found at Yale, Pennsylvania, Harvard and Chicago. Only three colleges 
have similar collections: Goucher with almost 1,000 tablets, Smith with about 800, 
and Haverford with a smaller number. It is due to Professor Clay of Yale Uni¬ 
versity that Goucher secured its collection. He brought the matter to the atten¬ 
tion of Professor Dougherty, who communicated with me. I was desirous of se¬ 
curing a collection of Babylonian tablets for three reasons: because I was eager 
to have Goucher College take part in the furthering of the knowledge of ancient 
Babylonia and Assyria; because I appreciated keenly the ability of Professor 
Dougherty to deal with the tablets and wanted him to have an opportunity for 
further research work; and because of my personal interest, inasmuch as my grad¬ 
uate research lay in the Semitic field. 

As usual, there were no funds available to buy the collection. My mind turned 
spontaneously to a friend of Goucher College whom I thought I could interest in 
the collection. He granted me an interview and in less than five minutes’ time 
authorized me to proceed with the purchase and to charge the expense to him. 
It is needless to say that we appreciate his gift and are greatly indebted to him. 
I regret that he refuses to allow me to mention his name. 


Others are far more capable than I am to judge of the value of this work which 
is now given to the public. Buttressed by the opinion of so eminent an authority 
as Professor Clay, however, and strengthened by the scholarly qualifications of 
Professor Dougherty, I am confident that this book will be an important supplement 
to the knowledge we now have of Babylonia and Assyria and particularly of that 
which comes from the archives ofErechin the time ofNebuchadrezzarandNabonidus. 


July 10, 1922. 


William W. Guth. 


To 

PRESIDENT WILLIAM WESTLEY GUTH 
A.B., S.T.B., Ph.D., LL.D. 

Whose Interest and Influence made possible 
the Goucher College Babylonian Collection 


















CONTENTS. 


Page 

Prefatory Note. 

Abbreviations. 

Introduction. 

General Remarks. 15 

The Value of Babylonian Temple Records . 15 

The Goucher College Babylonian Collection. 16 

Period of the Texts in this Volume. 17 

Allusions to Belshazzar. 19 

Seal Impressions. 19 

v 

Important References to the Sirkutu . 20 

A New Value for the GIS Sign. 20 

Transliterations and Translations of Selected Texts. 21 

Name Indices. 

Personal Names. 38 

Places. 55 

Temples . 56 

Canals. 56 

Gates. 56 

Catalogue. 57 


Autographed Texts...Plates I—LVI 


(9) 
























ABBREVIATIONS. 


BA 

BE 

BIN 

Br 

BRM 

BT 

Cyr 

GCBC 

GCCI 

HWB 

M 

MA 

Nbk 

Nbn 

NKI 

OBW 

BEN 

SBD 

SCWA 

TNN 

VS 

YBT 

YOR 

ZBAG 

ZK 


Beitrcige zur Assyriologie. 

Babylonian Expedition of the University of Pennsylvania. 
Babylonian Inscriptions in the Collection of J. B. Nies. 

Briinnow A Classified List of all Simple and Compound Ideographs. 
Babylonian Records in the Library of J. P. Morgan. 

Strassmaier Babylonische Texte. 

Inschriften von Cyrus, BT Heft VIII. 

Goucher College Babylonian Collection. 

Gouclier College Cuneiform Inscriptions. 

Delitzsch Assyrisches Handworterbuch. 

Meissner Seltene Assyrische Ideogramme. 

Muss-Arnold A Concise Dictionary of the Assyrian Language . 
Inschriften von Nabuchodonozor, BT , Heft VII. 

Inschriften von Nabonidus, BT, Heft I—IV. 

Langdon Die Neubabylonischen Konigsinschriften. 

Barton The Origin and Development of Babylonian Writing. 
Records from Erech, Time of Nabonidus, YBT Vol. VI. 

The Shirkutu of Babylonian Deities, YOR. Vol. V, Part 2. 

Ward The Seal Cylinders of Western Asia. 

Tallqvist Neubabylonisches Namenbuch. 

Vorderasiatische Schriftdenkmdler. 

Yale Oriental Series, Babylonian Texts. 

Yale Oriental Series, Researches. 

Ylvisaker, Zur Babylonischen und Assyrischen Grammatik. 
Zeitschrift fur Keilschriftforschung. 


(H) 





















































































ARCHIVES FROM ERECH 
TIME OF NEBUCHADREZZAR AND NABONIDUS 


















































4 

















INTRODUCTION. 


A little more than a century ago scholars were making their first attempts 
at the decipherment of the cuneiform language. The task was a difficult one and 
it was not until 1851 that the science was put on a firm basis by the initial 
achievement of Rawlinson. Today, as the result of many notable discoveries, the 
linguist and historian have at their disposal a veritable treasury of ancient liter¬ 
ature retrieved from the mounds of Mesopotamia, once the seat of mighty empires 
and the home of cultured peoples. 

This literature of a long past age consists of different kinds of inscriptions, 
each with its value in depicting the life of the period to which it belongs. Accounts 
of the campaigns of warlike kings, records of architectural work in the construction 
of palaces and temples, reports of astronomical observations, mathematical com¬ 
putations, bilingual dictionaries, hymns from temple liturgies, texts with formulae 
for divination, mythological narratives, etc., prove the complexity of the society 
which they represent. 

Assyriologists, however, have a rich field for study and investigation in another 
class of documents, the legal contracts, court records, official letters, and business 
inventories found in temple archives. The life of ancient Babylonia centered in 
the temple, which controlled the secular as well as the religious activities of the 
district over which it exercised jurisdiction. Naturally the main function of the 
temple was to perform ceremonies in honor of the gods, but it also served as a 
bank and court for the financial and legal affairs of the people. Careful records 
of all these dealings were kept by the temple authorities. Scribes skilled in the 
use of the stylus indented soft clay tablets with accurate accounts of transactions 
as soon as they were concluded. These tablets, some of them simply sun-dried, 
others baked in the fire, have been preserved for many centuries in the heaped 
ruins which now mark the sites of ancient centers of worship. 

The finding of these documents followed by their decipherment has unfolded 
a fascinating story of a civilization which was at its height long before the be¬ 
ginning of our era. It is stimulating to the imagination to realize that we today 

( 15 ) 


16 


GOUCHER COLLEGE CUNEIFORM INSCRIPTIONS, VOL. I 


possess records of the intimate daily life of people who had highly advanced rela¬ 
tions with one another thousands of years ago. Myth, legend, exaggeration, and 
misinformation find no place in these archives. Each tablet represents a definite 
transaction which took place at a certain time and place between individuals that 
are mentioned by name, the temple often being a party to the contract. Such an 
accumulation of records is of the highest value in the contributions it makes to 
our knowledge of the language, social relations, industries, commerce, law and re¬ 
ligion of a race that once exerted a dominating influence upon the course of history. 

While there is considerable Early Babylonian and some Assyrian literature 
of this type, most published texts belong to the Neo-Babylonian, Persian and 
Greek periods. The important European collections are found in the British 
Museum 1 and the Berlin Museum. 2 Among American institutions of learning 
numerous texts have been published by Pennsylvania University 3 and Yale Uni¬ 
versity. 4 The collections of the late J. P. Morgan 5 and the late Dr. J. B. Nies 6 are 
now in the Yale Babylonian Museum, the former as a loan collection and the latter, 
with J 50,000 for its increase and publication, as a bequest by Dr. Nies. 

In 1918 Goucher College was fortunate enough to secure, through the influ¬ 
ence of President Guth, who is a specialist in Semitics, and the generosity of a 
donor, a valuable collection of nearly a thousand Babylonian tablets. The dealer 
from whom they were purchased at the recommendation of Professor A. T. Clay 
certified that they came from the mound of Warka, the site of the ancient city of 
Erech, and their contents prove the correctness of his assertion. All available 
evidence indicates the antiquity and importance of Erech 7 as a metropolis of south¬ 
ern Babylonia. Its great temple was Eanna, noted for the worship of Ishtar, 
the supreme goddess of the Babylonians and the Assyrians. Astarte, “the queen 
of heaven,” whose worship by the Jews Jeremiah 8 so severely condemned, was 
the Phoenician counterpart of this Babylonian deity. She was represented by 
Aphrodite among the Greeks and by Venus among the Romans. 

About ninety per cent of the documents in the Goucher College Babylonian 
Collection belong to the Neo-Babylonian and Persian periods. Mentioning the 
reign with the largest number of tablets first, and so on down to the reigns with 

» BT Heft I-XII. 2 VS Heft III—VI. 3 BE Vols. VIII-X. 

* YBT Vols. I, III, VI and VII. » BUM Parts I and II. 6 BIN Parts I and II. 

7 Genesis 10:10. 8 Jeremiah 44. 


DOUGHERTY—ARCHIVES FROM ERECH 


17 


the fewest number, the following reigns are represented: Nebuchadrezzar, Nabo- 
nidus, Nabopolassar, Cambyses, Amel-Marduk, Darius, Cyrus, Neriglissar, Kanda- 
lanu and Barzia. The dating of nearly three hundred tablets is not complete 
enough to determine the reigns, or years, to which they belong. However, their 
contents and style of writing prove that they belong to the late rather than the 
early Babylonian period. More than fifty records are in the Sumerian language 
and therefore belong to a very early period. Over a dozen are labels, known as 
bullae, that were attached to sacks of grain, bundles of produce, etc., sent from 
one place to another. 

The four hundred and twenty texts of this volume belong to the reigns of 
Nebuchadrezzar and Nabonidus, two hundred and sixty-two to the reign of Nebu¬ 
chadrezzar (604—561 B. C.) and one hundred and fifty-eight to the reign of 
Nabonidus (555 — 538 B. C.). (Some authorities regard 539 B. C. as the conclud¬ 
ing year of the reign of Nabonidus.) These two kings together reigned a total 
of sixty years of the eighty-seven years representing the Neo-Babylonian period, 
from the first year of Nabopolassar (625 B. C.) to the capture of Babylon by 
Cyrus (538 B. C.). If the time were reckoned from the capture of Nineveh by 
Nabopolassar (606 B. C.), the combined reigns of Nebuchadrezzar and Nabonidus 
would represent an even greater percentage. 

The following tables show the distribution of the tablets throughout the 
reigns of the two kings. The only years missing in the reign of Nebuchadrezzar 
are the year of accession, the tenth and fifteenth. All the years of Nabonidus are 
represented except the fourteenth. While the exact date of thirty-four tablets 
cannot be determined, it is interesting to note how the tablets are grouped to¬ 
gether in certain parts of the reigns. The catalogue gives a summary of the con- 


tents of all the tablets. 

Year of Number of 

Time of Nebuchadrezzar. 

Year of Number of 

Year of 

Number of 

Reign 

Tablets 

Reign 

Tablets 

Reign 

Tablets 

Acc. 

0 

5 

5 

10 

0 

1 

3 

6 

1 

11 

1 

2 

4 

7 

2 

12 

3 

3 

4 

8 

3 

13 

1 

4 

2 

9 

1 - 

14 

2 


18 


GOUCHER COLLEGE CUNEIFORM INSCRIPTIONS, VOL. I 


Year of 

Number of 

Year of 

Number of 

Year of 

Number of 

Reign 

Tablets 

Reign 

Tablets 

Reign 

Tablets 

15 

0 

25 

1 

35 

5 

16 

1 

26 

7 

36 

15 

17 

1 

27 

4 

37 

16 

18 

6 

28 

1 

38 

17 

19 

2 

29 

2 

39 

15 

20 

O 

O 

30 

4 

40 

11 

21 

6 

31 

3 

41 

15 

22 

20 

32 

8 

42 

15 

23 

8 

33 

3 

43 

4 

24 

6 

34 

5 

? 

26 



Time or 

Nabonldus. 



Year of 

Number of 

Year of 

Number of 

Year of 

Number of 

Reign 

Tablets 

Reign 

Tablets 

Reign 

Tablets 

Acc. 

1 

7 

32 

14 

0 

1 

3 

8 

14 

15 

1 

2 

4 

9 

6 

16 

1 

3 

10 

10 

18 

17 

1 

4 

5 

11 

24 

? 

8 

5 

22 

12 

3 



6 

3 

13 

2 




It is not necessary to give more than a brief description of the historical 
setting of these two kings. Nebuchadrezzar was the son of Nabopolassar, who 
with the help of the Medes captured the city of Nineveh in 606 B. C. and thus 
brought an end to the Assyrian empire. While still crown prince, Nebuchadrezzar 
led the Babylonian army that defeated the Egyptians at the battle of Carchemish 
in 605 B. C., which victory decided the fate of the Mediterranean countries for¬ 
merly tributary to Assyria. After pursuing the Egyptians to the borders of their 
land, he hurried back on account of the death of his father. Immediately assum¬ 
ing the reins of government, he ruled with a strong hand for forty-three years. 
The royal inscriptions which belong to his reign deal mainly with building oper¬ 
ations. In 586 B. C. he captured Jerusalem and caused the Jews to dwell as 
exiles in Babylonia. 


DOUGHERTY—ARCHIVES FROM ERECH 


19 


After Nebuchadrezzar came the brief and unimportant reigns of Amel- 
Marduk (Evil-Merodach), Neriglissar, and Labashi-Marduk (Laborosoarchod). 
Nabonidus, the last of the Neo-Babylonian kings, was not of the royal line. The 
son of Nabu-balatsu-iqbi, he was chosen by the priests of Babylon as the occupant 
of the throne after the last three kings of the Nabopolassar dynasty had demon¬ 
strated their weakness and inefficiency. The character of Nabonidus indicates 
that he could not have been a usurper in the ordinary sense of the term. Inter¬ 
ested more in archaeological investigations and religious reforms than in the poli¬ 
tical affairs of his kingdom, he left military matters to his son, Belshazzar, who as 
crown prince seems to have exercised almost regal authority. There is little doubt 
that the latter would have become another Nebuchadrezzar, if Cyrus had not put 
an end to his dreams. 

The texts of this volume contain three references to Belshazzar. No. 322, 1 
which mentions him by name, is a receipt for the tithe which he paid to the 
temple in Erech. In the other cases he is referred to by the title mar sarri = “the 
son of the king,” i. e., crown prince. No. 405:1 — 7 indicates that he was entitled 
to the same treatment accorded his father, while No. 355:1—3 2 is a record of 
money paid to a man sent to him, probably with a message. 

There are nineteen seal impressions. Thirteen are records of wine received 
by Gimillu, the son of Ardia, for goldsmiths, coppersmiths, blacksmiths, weavers, 
shoemakers, farmers, cattlemen and sheep shearers. See Nos. 76, 99, 100, 101, 
102, 103, 104, 107, 136, 138, 171, 182, 183. Gimillu was evidently in charge of 
the distribution of wine to those who worked for the temple in various capacities. 
Another tablet with a seal impression, No. 410, shows that he was entrusted with 
iron wagons. Five tablets are records of flour and barley received by Ina-silli-Nergal 
for similar workmen. See Nos. 105, 106, 137, 147, 150. The most common sym¬ 
bol of these seals is the figure of a worshipper with hand outstretched to a star 
or crescent, or both. See Nos. 154, 239, 241 in REN. The caduceus, or herald’s 
staff, plus an eight-pointed rosette-like star in Nos. 99, 100, 103, 183, is more 
unusual. For reference to Ishtar’s “caduceus of two serpents with bulging necks” 
see SCWA p. 156. Figures 135, 414, 416, 417, ibid., give representations of the 
caduceus without the star. Attention should also be called to No. 385 in this 


1 See transliteration and translation on page 37. 

2 See transliteration and translation on page 37. 


20 


GOUCHER COLLEGE CUNEIFORM INSCRIPTIONS, VOL. I 


volume, as it contains the head of a bird scratched on the edge of the tablet. There 
is no apparent reason for this action on the part of the scribe. See also No. 368. 

The texts concerning the sirkutu , are important as they give additional data 
concerning this class of temple servants, discussed in REN p. 13f. Nos. 161, 
361, 401 are among the transliterated and translated texts. 1 They show that flour 
was given .to members of the sirkutu for the performance of work, such as draw¬ 
ing the ship of a temple official or going for cattle, and that clothing was also 
given to them. No. 361 is especially interesting in that it is the simple record of 
the dedication of an individual to the order. Other references to the sirkutu are 


in Nos. 38, 89, 125, 234, 235, 249, 256. From these texts we learn that money, 
as well as wine, barley and flour, was given to members of the sirkutu. Additional 
evidence of the existence of a chief sirku is furnished and there is an allusion to 

v 

the seal of a sirku. The name Sa- d Na-na-a-tas-mit , 96:7; 166:6,meaning “The one 
whom Nana has marked,“ no doubt refers to the practice of marking a sirku with 
the figure of a star. No. 89:2, 3, indicates that there was a table for the sirkutu. 2 

v 

There is abundant use of the GIlS sign in contexts where we would expect 
forms of nasu, such as is-su-it, it-ta-si , and it-ta-su-u. Evidence that the sign is in¬ 
tended to represent nasu is furnished by the following passages. 

No. 405:1—7 

12 siqil kaspi a-na si-di-ti-su-nu sa ul-tu arah -Abu a-di arah -Tebetu a-na m Nur-e-a 
u m Ki-na-a sa ri-ha-a-tu 3 a-na mar sarri is-su-u na-din: 

“12 shekels of silver for their maintenance, which from the month Ab to the 
month Tebet are given to Nurea and Kina, who the rihdtu to the son of the king 
brought.” 

No. 72:6 — 10 

1 siqtu a-na m Nadina(-na)-ahu apil md In-nin-zer-ibni sa ri-lja-a-ta 3 a-na sarri 
GIS-u na-din. 


“1 shekel is given to Nadina-ahu, the son of Innin-zer-ibni, who the riljdta to 
the king brought.” 

1 See page 36. 

2 For a full discussion of Babylonian temple servants, dedicated to pai'ticular deities, see SBD, YOU 
Vol. 5, Part 2. The reason for writing the term sirkutu with k instead of q is given in SBD, note 1. 

3 Cf. 22:5; 184:7; 405:14. Ri-ha-a-tu, ri-ha-a-ta, may be the plural of rehtu, rihtu, “rest,” “re¬ 
mainder.” See MA p. 959. Rihutu , “liquid,” “that which is poured out,” also suggests itself. See MA 
p. 958. Either of these etymologies could be accepted on the assumption that the word probably developed 
a technical meaning. 


DOUGHERTY—ARCHIVES FROM ERECH 


21 


V 

Another good comparison is found in No. 36, where GIS in line 10 is used 

v 

in the same sense as it-ta-si in line 7. A study of all the appearances of GIS and 

v V 

GIS-ti adds weight to this conclusion. 1 Thus the value GIS = nasu = “raise,” 
“carry,” “bring,” “take,” seems to be established. The possibility of using this 
value in the hitherto unexplained GIS-BAR at once suggests itself. MAS = sibtu = 

v 

“increase,” “interest.” 2 M 1056 indicates that the more simple MAS sign may be 

V V V 

used for sibtu. Hence GIS-BAR may be read GIS-MAS = nas sibti = “the bring¬ 
ing of increase or interest.” The shorter translation “tax” is as applicable to 
nas sibti as to nas bilti. 


Transliterations and Translations of Selected Texts. 

Transliterations and translations of selected texts are given in order that the 
catalogue may be supplemented and the actual character of the documents more 
fully illustrated. Thus students of ancient civilization, unacquainted with cunei¬ 
form writing, will have at their command original sources for the reconstruction 
of Babylonian society. At the same time, lexicographical notes, based on the 
texts given, will be welcomed by those interested in the Babylonian language. A 
discussion of other texts and grammatical forms contained in this volume will be 
published in the future. 


No. 35. Lease of property from a woman for four years. 

This document shows that a Babylonian woman in the 6th century B. C. 
could own considerable real estate and had the right to draw up a rigid agreement 
in leasing it. The fact that she required a daily rental of 12 meals indicates, either 
that her household was large enough to consume that amount of food, or that it 
was her purpose to sell what was given and thus profit, we may imagine, by 
prices, should they advance. A fine was imposed in case of any breakage of pro¬ 
perty. It was also legal for a daughter to attest the contract. These rights of 


1 For Recurrences of GIG see 13:4; 21:6; 31:7; 36:10; 38:4; 39:8; 41:3; 48:5; 53:6; 55:3, 6, 8; 
67:4,6; 81:10; 87:8; 92:9,13; 141:8; 180:4, 5; 181:2,7; 191:6; 193:3; 210:4, 10; 218:7; 255:4, 8; 266:4; 
327:7; 395:8. See also REN 39:6,7, 10,17, 19,21,23,24,33; 66:3, 11. 

For occurrences of GIS-u and GIS-u see 72:10; 78:8; 92:8; 133:8; 212:3; 226:5; 234:14; 241:6; 
244:15; 255:2; 402:9. 

For the purpose of comparison note the use of it-ta-si and it-ta-su-u in 16:3; 20:5; 30:4; 36:7; 


22 


GOUCHER COLLEGE CUNEIFORM INSCRIPTIONS, YOL. I 


women are indicative of an advanced state of society in Babylonia long before 
the beginning of our era. 1 


Bit md Bel-iddin apil-su sa md Nabu-etir 
bitu sutu 

hitu sadu u bitit ru-uk-bu 
fA-mat-a ina hu-ud lib-bi-su a-na m Ki-i- 
d Nabu 

h qal-la sa m Ardi- d Nabu a-na u-mu 
5 12 a-lm-lu u sattu 1/2 siqil Jcaspi 

a-na aS-sa-bu-tu a-di 4 sandti mes 
ta-ad-din sa ib-ba-lak-ki-tu 
10 Siqil kaspi i-tur-ru ina a-Sa-bu 
sa fKul-la-a mdrti-su 

10 h mukinnu m Kudurruapil-siisa md Nabu-suni- 
iddin 

m Ibni- d Intiina apil-su sa m Baldt-su 
md Nabu-sum-lUir apil-su sa m Nad-na-a 
u h dupsarru md SamaS-sum-iddin apil-su sa 
md Ba-u-ali-iddin 

Uruk ki ara, ‘2abdtu umu 2S kam sattu 22 kam 
15 d Nabu-kudurri-usur sar Bdbili u 


The house of Bel-iddin, the son of Nabu-etir, 
the south house, 

the east house and the rukbu 2 house 
Amata, of her own free will, to Ki- 
Nabu, 

the slave of Ardi-Nabu, at the daily rental 
of 12 meals and the yearly rental of a half 
shekel of silver for occupancy for 4 years 
gave. If anything is broken, 
he shall return 10 shekels of silver. In the 
presence of Kuila, his (or her) daughter. 
Witnesses: Kudurru, the son of Nabu-shum- 
iddin, 

Ibni-Innina, the son of Balatsu, 
Nabu-shum-lishir, the son of Nadna, 
and the scribe, Shamash-shum-iddin, the son 
of Bau-alj-iddin. 

Erech, the 28th day of Shabat, the 22nd year 
of Nebuchadrezzar, king of Babylon. 


No. 385. Sale of a slave. 

In this document a wife is placed on an equality with her husband in the 
ownership and sale of a slave. No difference is recognized between the two in the 
responsibility which is assumed in making the contract. There is undoubted evi¬ 
dence here of the high legal position reached by women in Babylonia. 

md Bel-uSallim apil-su sa m Eriba(-ba) apil Bel-ushallim, the son of Eriba, son of 
m Epes(-es)-ilu [a f ll-su-nu] Epesh-ilu, [and Usunu], 

mardt-suSa m $u-la-aasSati Sa md Bel-usallim thedaughter of Shula, the wife of Bel-ushallim, 
ina liu-ud lib-bi-Su-nu md Samas-itti-ia of their own free will, Shamash-ittia, 

h qal-la-8u-nu a-na 1 ma-na kaspi a-na their slave, for 1 mina of silver for 
5 Simi gam-ru-tu a-na m Ibni- d Istar apil-su the full price to Ibni-Ishtar, the son 


10 


sa m Mar-duk-a hiappahu id-di-nu 
pu-ut h si-hu-u l h ipa-qir-ra-nu 
h arad surru-u-tu u h mdru-u-tu 
Sa ina muh-hi md &amas-itti-ia 
h qal-la-su-nu i[l-la]-a md Bel-usallim 


of Marduka, the blacksmith, gave. 

The responsibility of claimant, plaintiff, 
service for the king and sonship, 
which upon Shamash-ittia, 
their slave, rests, Bel-ushallim 


1 Cf. 8ayce Babylonians and Assyrians, Chapter II. BA Yol. 4, pp. l—72. 

2 Consult rukbu, HWB p. 620 and MA p. 963. GUSUR = uru = “beam” seems to have rukbu as 
a parallel Semitic value. Zimmern Ritualtafeln 41—42 i 20 contains the following, tarbasa ura ruk-bi-e-ti 
apati tultappat. The translation “beams” for ruk-bi-e-ti suits the context. The word rukbu, from rakubu = 
“mount,” “ride,” suggests the modem use of the term “rider.” The rukbu house was evidently a structure 
in which beams played an important part. 


DOUGHERTY—ARCHIVES FROM ERECH 


23 


u fj[l]-su-nu asSatu-Su na-su-u 
h mu-Jcin-nu m Mu-se-zib- d Bel apil-Su Sa 
m Suni-ukin 

v 

m Sa- d Nabd-Sii-u apil-Su Sa md Bel-ri-man-ni 
apil h man-di-di 

m Ki-$ih- d Naim apil-Su Sa ’"Su-la-a apil .. .e-a 
15 md Istar-zer-ibni apil-su sa m Su-la-a 
h dupSarru 

md Nabu-bel-Su-nu apil-su sa m Kudurru apil 
m E-kur-za-kir- 

Uruk ki ara} iAddaru wnu ll kam Sattu 3 kam 
md Nabu-nd’id Sar Babili ki 


and I[l]sunu, his wife, assume. 

Witnesses: Mushezib-Bel, the son of 
Shum-ukin, 

Sha-Nabu-shu, the son of Bel-rimanni, 
son of the measurer, 

Kishik-Nabu, the son of Shula, son of. . . ea, 
Ishtar-zer-ibni, the son of Shula. 

The scribe, 

Nabu-belsliunu, the son of Kudurru, son of 
Ekur-zakir. 

Erech, the 11th day of Adar, the 3rd year 
of Nabonidus, king of Babylon. 


No. 15. Three men become surety for the return of a man to the temple. 

Bailment was a common occurence in Babylonian legal procedure. This re¬ 
cord presupposes a claim of the temple against the individual whose release is 
secured for a limited period of time. Failure to live up to the terms of the con¬ 
tract involved a monetary fine. 
md Nabu-na’id apil-su sa md Bel-iddin 


m Si--ilu apil-su sa md Na-na-a-karabi 
u md Bel-ibni apil-su sa md Nabit-iddin 
pu-ut nl Bi-mut apil-su sa md Nabu-iddin 

5 in a qat md Anum-sar-usur h qi-i-p i 
u md Marduk-etir Hangii E-an-na 
na-su-u ina eli nikasi 
Sa si-e-nu ib-ba-ku-nis-[$im-ma] 
a-na h qi-i-pi u h satammi 
10 i-nam-di-nu-us 

ki-i la i-tab-ku-nim-ma 

la id-dan-nu-us 5 ma-na kaspi 

a-na E-an-na i-nam-di-nu 

h mu-kin-nu m Zeri-ia apil-su Sa md Ndbu- 

mudammiq apil . 

15 md Nergal-a- sa-rid apil-su sa m Na-din 
mar m An-da-hir 

m Mar-duk apil-su sa md Ndbu-ah-iddin 
u h dupSarru md Marduk-etir apil-su sa 
md Bel-Sum-iskun(-un) mar m Da-bi-bi 
Hangu E-an-na 
20 Uruk u ara1 iAbu umu 12 kam 
sattu 5 kam d Nabu-kudurri-usur 
sar Babili ki 


Nabu-na’id, the son of Bel-iddin, 

Shi’ilu, the son of Nana-karabi, 
and Bel-ibni, the son of Nabu-iddin, 
the responsibility of Rimiit, the son of 
Nabu-iddin, 

from Anum-shar-usur, the guardian, 
and Marduk-etir, the priest of Eanna, 
assume. At the time of the appraisement 
of sheep they shall bring him and 
to the guardian and administrator 
they shall give him. 

If they do not bring and 
give him, 5 minas of silver 
to Eanna they shall give. 

Witnesses: Zeria, the son of Nabii- 
mudammiq, son of .... , 

Nergal-asharid, the son of Nadin, 
son of Andahir, 

Marduk, the son of Nabu-ah-iddin, 
and the scribe, Marduk-etir, the son of 
Bel-shum-ishkun, son of Dabibi, 

A 

the priest of Eanna. 

Erech, the 12th day of Ab, 
the 5th year of Nebuchadrezzar, 
king of Babylon. 



24 


GOUCHER COLLEGE CUNEIFORM INSCRIPTIONS, VOL. I 


No. 260. Record of bailment. 

This interesting record from the temple archives indicates that bailment in¬ 
volved the performance of definite duties by the person bailed. The original de¬ 
tention of Kurbanni-Marduk may have been due to negligence with respect to the 
very things which it was stipulated he should do when Shamash-ah-iddin secured 
his release and became surety for his “feet,” i. e., his movements, and his ultimate 
delivery to Nabu-ahe-bullit in Babylon if he failed to perform his part of the con¬ 


tract properly. 

md Sama$-ah-iddin apil-su sa md TUR-E-sag- 
ila-ni-bi 

apil m Mi-sir-a-apu-ut Sepe sa m Kur-ban-ni- 
d Marduk 

apil-su sa m lqisa(-hi) apil m Ba-bu-tu 
ina qat 

md Nabu-ahe mes -bullit(-it) apil-su sa m Sa- 
d Ndbu-su-u 

5 h sangu E-an-na na-Si suluppa 
i-ma§-sih-ma a-ki-i i-mit-ti-su 
a-na md Bel-alie m ^-iqiSa(-sa) i-nam-din 
u m E-til-luib-bak-kam-ma a-na md Bel-ahe- mes 
iqtsa(-sa) 

i-nam-din ki-i suluppu al-la 1 
10 i-mit-ti-su un-da-at-tu-u u m E-til-lu 
la i-tab-kam-ma la id-dan-nu 

V 

md ’Samas-ah-iddin m Kur-ban-ni- d Marduk 
ina ara h Nisannu ina Bdbili ,ci a-na 
md Nabu-abe mes -bullit(-it) i-nam-din 
15 h mu-kin-nu md Marduh-Sarr-a-ni apil-su sa 
m Ta-lim apil m >Sanati-a m Sii-la-a apil-su 
sa md Nabii-ah-iddin 
u h dup8arru md In-nin-zer-usabsi(-$i) 
apil-su sa 


A 

Shamash-ah-iddin, the son of TXJR- Esagila- 
nibi, 

son of Misira, the responsilility of the feet 
of Kurbanni-Marduk, 
the son of Iqisha, son of Babutu, 
from 

Nabu-ahe-bullit, the son of Sha- 
Nabu-shu, 

A 

the priest of Eanna, bears. The dates 
he shall measure and according to his impost 
to Bel-ahe-iqisha he shall give, 
and Etillu he shall bring and to Bel-ahe- 
iqisha 

he shall give. If the dates aside from 
his impost are lacking and Etillu 
he does not bring and give, 

Shamash-ah-iddin Kurbanni-Marduk 
in the month Nisan in Babylon to 
Nabu-ahe-bullit shall give. 

Witnesses: Marduk-sharrani, the son of 
Talim, son of Shanatia, Simla, the son 
of Nabu-ah-iddin, 
and the scribe, Innin-zer-ushabshi, 
the son of 


1 A sentence occurring in GCBC 770:86,37 which will be published in Archives from Erech, Neo- 
Babylonian and Persian Periods, GCCI Vol. II, 388, throws light upon the use of the Babylonian 
particle alia. The sentence is h irrisu al-la su-nu ina lib-bi ia-a-nu , “A farmer other than them in it there is 
none.” Hence al-la i-mit-ti-su may mean “except his impost,” or “aside from his impost.” The phrase 
al-la i-mit-ti-su should be compared with a-ki-i i-mit-ti-lu in line 6. If these two phrases are opposite in 
meaning, the former may mean “contrary to his impost,” or “not in accordance with his impost,” since the 

latter means “according to his impost.” Arabic M j is commonly, though not always, used with a negative. 

The expressions ia-a-nu and un-da-at-tu-u in the above sentences give a negative force to the contexts in 

which alia is used. Cf. Wright’s Arabic Grammar, II p. 349 for the use of ^ with a pronominal suffix, 

showing that al-la su-nu is not without parallel. Cf. ZB AG p. 52 f. 


DOUGHERTY—ARCHIVES FROM ERECH 


25 


wd Na-na-a-kardbi ni-ri-bi sa duri 
aral iKislimu umu 9 kam sattu 31 kam 
20 d Ndbii-kudurri-usur sar Bdbili 


Nana-karabi. The entrance of the fort, 
the 9th day of Kislev, the 31st year of 
Nebuchadrezzar, king of Babylon. 


No. 94. Promissory Note. 

This document exhibits the usual phraseology of a promise to pay a debt. 
The facts are stated in the following order: amount of debt, creditor, debtor, and 
time when the debt is to be paid. In this case there are two debtors and they are 
equally responsible. Some explanatory notes are often added. 


3 ma-na 8 siqil kaspi qaqqcidu sa II 
siqlu pit-qa 


sa md Innina-zer-ibni apil-su sa m Ri-mut 
ina muh-hi md Sin-iddin h qi-i-pi 
sa E-an-na u md Nabu-bdni-abi apil-su 
sa m lbna-a 

5 apil m E-kur-za-kir ina ara * DiCuzu 
i-nam-din-nu- 

isten(-en) pu-ut sa-ni-e na-su-u 
kaspu sa a-na dul-la u kurummate zun 
sa h re'e mc * sa a-na m Ina-esi-etir 
apil-su sa md Na-na-a-ah-iddin 
10 e-lat u-il-tim sa 2/3 ma-na 8 siqil 
kaspi 

h mu-kin-nu md Enlil-sdpik-zer 
h TIK-EN-NA m Itti- d Nabu-balatu apil-su 
sa md Nabu-ga-mil m 8um-iddin apil-su 
sa md Nergal-usallim md Samas-dh-iddin 
15 apil-su sa m Balat-su u h dupsarru md Nabu- 
bdni-dhi 

apil-su sa m Ibna-a Hangil sa E-an-na 
dl Sur-ru aral jAbu umu 8 kam 
sattu 41 kam d Nabu-kudurri-usur 
sar Babili ki 


3 minas, 8 shekels of silver, the principal, 
consisting of half shekel pieces(?), 
of Innina-zer-ibni, the son of Rimut, 
to be paid by Sin-iddin, the guardian 
of Eanna, and Nabu-bani-ahi, the son 
of Ibna, 

A 

son of Ekur-zakir, in the month Tammuz 
they shall pay. 

The two bear one responsibility. 

Money which is for the work and food 
of the shepherds which are for Ina*eshi-etii, 
the son of Nana-ah-iddin. 

In addition, the document of 2/3 mina 8 
shekels of silver. 

Witnesses: Enlil-shfipik-zer, 
the TIK-EN-NA, Itti-Nabu-balatu, the son 
of Nabu-gamil, Shum-iddin, the son 
of Nergal-ushallim, Shamash-ah-iddin, 
the son of Balatsu, and the scribe, Nabu- 
bani-ahi, 

^ 7 # A 

the son of Ibna, the priest of Eanna. 

The city of Surru, the 8th day of Ab, 
the 41st year of Nebuchadrezzar, 
king of Babylon. 


No. 388. Report oe weaving. 

The art of weaving was extensively practised in Babylonia. This is shown by 
the many kinds of garments referred to in various documents. In the following 

text a number of unusual expressions occur. 

2 ma-na kit Hu-ma-nu l a-na HSpari 2 minas of woven cloth for the weaver, 

15 siqle a-na bit dul-lu 15 shekels for the work house, 

1/3 siqlu a-na bit kare me ° 1/3 shekel for the store house, 

i The expression kiia tu-ma-nu refers to some kind of cloth, as the determinative indicates. The root 
tamu = “spin,” “weave,” forms the basis of the term. Cp. siilmanu ti-om. salamu. Cf. REN 168:10 for 
kMutu-inan, and REN 113:1,9 for what should evidently be read kdd ti-mu. 


26 


GOUCHER COLLEGE CUNEIFORM INSCRIPTIONS, VOL. I 


a-na ? uUi lafnh.ussi l 2 sa ara bAbu umu l kam 
5 sattu 3 kam d Nabu-nalid Sar JBabili kl 
3 ma-na 1/3 Siqil kit Hu-ma-nu 
Sa umu 4 kam Sa arak Ululu umu 16 kam 
Sa ara, i TJlulu 

Sa Sanita(-ta) s . uMt lamhuSSe mes a-na 
h ispari 

1/2 ma-na [a-na] bit dul-lu 
10 5/6 ma-na a-na bit kare mes 
Sa Sanita(-ta) ? uUt lamhuSSe mes Sa 
ara l l Ululu 

2 ma-na kit Hu-ma-nu a-na Hspari 
1/3 Siqlu a-na bit dul-lu 
1/3 siqlu a-na bit kare mes 
15 a-na ? uUt lamhuSSi Sa arah -TiSritu 
umu 8 kam 

5/6 ma-na ti-me' 1 kab-ba-ru 
Sa .. ta-KIL Sa d Usur-a-mat-su 
u d As-ka--ti 11/2 ma-na 
a-na is . U-ZU ba-ni-ti qatd 
u tur-ri-e Sa bdbati me 


for a stately garment of the 1st day of Ah, 
the 3rd year of Nabonidus, king of Babylon. 
3 minas, 1/3 shekel of woven cloth 
of the 4th day of Elul, the 16th day 
of Elul, 

of two stately garments for 
the weaver. 

1/2 mina [for] the work house, 

5/6 mina for the store house, 
of two stately garments of 
the month Elul. 

2 minas of woven cloth for the weaver, 

1/3 shekel for the work house, 

1/3 shekel for the store house, 
for a stately garment of the 8th day of 
Tishri. 

5/6 mina of kabbaru 3 weaving 
of ... . KIL 4 of Usur-amatsu 
and Ashka’ti. 11/2 minas 
for is U-ZU , 5 6 made by hand, 
and turret of gates. 


1 Br. 12055 gives * ubat SA-LAM = lamliussu. See MA p. 486. 

2 Cp. with kii Hi-mu, BEN 118:1,9. 

3 MA p. 367 translates kabbaru 2 “flax,” “bast.” See Nbn 163:2; 164:12. It seems possible to 
connect kabbaru with Hebrew ”D3 = “to bind together,” “to plait,” “to intertwine.” The nominal forms 
*033 = “sieve,” and V33 = “something netted” are suggestive, though kabbaru — “very large” would convey 
the same idea when qualifying ti-me “weaving,” or “woven material.” See Procedings of the Society of 
Biblical Archaelogy , Jan. 1916, p. 29, line 11, for what may be read 2 an& ti-mu. 

4 The primary meaning of the sign KIL is “enclosure,” as the form of the sign indicates. It is diffi¬ 
cult to determine whether ta should be read with KIL or a preceding sign which is illegible. If KIL is 
to be read as a separate ideogram, it probably refers to some sacred compound of the deities Usur-amatsu 
and Ashka’ti. 

5 The correct meaning of l ?U-ZU is not easy to determine. M 7263 gives i anil usu as a value of the 
DI sign. Barton in OBW, No. 415:4, translates the expression as “a kind of reed.” As ZU also has the 
value SU, 4U-ZU may be read is .u-su, but this reading is too precarious to form the basis of a final con¬ 
clusion. Cp. sam ezizu, HWB p. 36. 

6 There are few occurrences of the word turru. See MA p. 1189. In the building inscriptions of 
Nebuchadrezzar occur the following passages: NKI 86:13, i-na tu-Ur-ri e-li-i sa abulli d Is-ta-ar, “at the 
upper turru of the Ishtar gate.” NKI 188:33,34, is-tu si-ip-pi i-mi-it-ti sa abulli d Is-ta-ar a-di tu-ur-ri 
sa-ap-li-i sa Ni-mi-it-ti- d En-lil, “from the right threshold of the Ishtar gate up to the lower turru of Ni- 
mitti-Enlil”. In the lattercase Langdon translates “bastion,” and inhisglossaryhehas turru = Turm, or “tower.” 
The word may be connected with the root *MJn, in which case it would refer to something curving in the 
form of a circle. Nblc 134:5,14,17 furnishes the expressions bab tu-ru and tu-ru babi. As TZJhas the value 
tdru, it may be that tu-ru should be read turru(-ru). The translation “walls, or towers of the gates” for 
tur-ri-e sa b(ibati nie may be approximately correct. It is not unlikely that the reference is to some kind 
of wicker or wattle work. 


DOUGHERTY—ARCHIVES FROM ERECH 


27 


No. 228. Money paid for various articles. 

As an itemized statement of various transactions, this document gives a 
glimpse of the commercial and industrial activities of the time. It may be a com¬ 


pilation from smaller documents. 

5 siqil kaspi ina kaspi sa ir-bi 
a-na riqqe* un Sa bit m Rab-ba-ni-e 
2 1/2 Siqle a-na i ?daldti rnea 
sa bit h ispare mes napharu 7 1/2 
Siqil kaspi 

5 a-na md Nabu-Sum-liSir apil-Su sa 
md Nabu-mukin-zer u m Gi-mil-lu 
apil m Ardi-ia na-din 
11/2 siqil kurummate mn -Su sa 
ara l l Arodisamnu 
m Zeri-ia apil m Ahe mes -sa-a 
io 1/2 Siqlu a-na 5/6 ma-na anaki 
a-na m Lib-lut h nappahi na-din 
1 Siqlu a-na m Baldt-su apil m Ardi- d Nabu 
u h sdbe me sa it-ti-Su a-na pdni Hatammi 
il-lik na-din 

15 ara bArodisamnu iimu 25 kam . 

d Nabu-kudurri-usur Sar Bdbili ki 


5 shekels of silver of the silver of the income 
for the wood of the house of Rab-bani; 

2 1/2 shekels for the doors 
of the weavers’ house; Total, 7 1/2 
shekels of silver, 
to Nabu-shura-lishir, the son of 
Nabu-mukin-zer, and Gimillu, 
the son of Ardia, are given. 

1 3 /2 shekels, his food of 
the month Marchesvan, 

Zeria, the son of Alie-sa; 

1 /2 shekel for 5/6 mina of lead 
to Liblut, the blacksmith, is given. 

1 shekel to Balatsu, the son of Ardi-Nahu, 
and the soldiers, who with him to the presence 
of the administrator went, is given. 

The 25th day of Marchesvan. 

of Nebuchadrezzar, king of Babylon. 


No. 379. Itemized statement of expenditures. 

Additional phases of Babylonian life are presented in this document. The 
temple was interested in all the activities of society, as is indicated by the varied 
entries in this record. 


2 Siqle 2-ta qdtd me a-na 1 gur 1 pi 
24 qa & E-BAR 

v 

a-na qwii sa-lam biti a-na md iSamas- 
ah-iddin 

1 siqlu a-na 2 pi 18 qa 8E-BAR a-na 

ki-is-sa-ti alpe me 

sa ’ Hal-la-ak-ti 2 a-na m Zeri-ia apil 
md Na-na-a-ali-iddin 

2 siqle a-na 1 gur 8E-BAR ina 

kurummate tun me sa h qi-i-pi 


2 shekels and two-thirds for 1 kor, 1 pi, 
24 qa of barley 

for flour salam biti 1 to Shamash- 
ah-iddin; 

1 shekel for 2 pi, 18 qa of barley for 

the fodder of the oxen 
of the road to Zeria, the son of 
Nana-ah-iddin (are given). 

2 shekels for 1 kor of barley out of the 

maintenance of the guardian 


1 For other occurrences of theplirase sal(iMbitiseel9& : 6;203:6 ;3/9:2. bulmu/DI-mu) biti ^occursin 12:2, 
while sa-la-mu biti sa d Adad occui’s in Nbn318: 5. Cf. alsoiVTm 641:4; 767:2; Cyr. 229:3; and REN 189:2; 192:2. 
The word salmu, construct, salam, means “health,” “prosperity,” “safety.” It is evident that in the contexts 
just quoted it is used in the sense of some provision for the good condition or complete furnishing of a house. 

2 is .tal-la-ak-ti is an unusual expression on account of the determinative for wood. Tallaktu, irom 
alaku, = “walk,” “step,” “road,” “entrance.” It is possible that it may refer to something like a corduroy 
road, or a bridge-like structure through a marsh. Analogy with French ckemin de fer and German 
Eisenbahn suggests the possibility of wooden tracks lor carts drawn by oxen. 




28 


GOUCHER COLLEGE CUNEIFORM INSCRIPTIONS, VOL. I 


ina mas-sar-ti 5a h bappire me u 
h nuJiatimmc mc 

1 5iqlu a-na 2 pi 18 qa HE-BA R 5a 
kurummat& un 5a m Itti-ildni me -ia 
h naggar '?elippe me h agarru 
1 5iqlu a-na 2 pi 18 qa a-na Jd-is-sa-tu 
5a issurati zun 
10 md Innina-ri-su-u-a 

arak Nisannu unml5 kam 5attnl0 kam d Nabu-nd'id 
5ar Babili hi 


from the ma55artu 1 of the brewers and 
the bakers; 

1 shekel for 2 pi, 18 qa of the barley of 
the maintenance of Itti-ilania, 
the sliip-carpenter, the hired laborer; 

1 shekel for 2 pi, 18 qa for the provender 
of fowls, 

lnnina-risua (received). 

The 15th of Nisan, the 10th year of 
Nabonidus, king of Babylon. 


No. 276. Stipulation that no complaint shall be made about a debt. 
Babylonian law was very exact and all contracts were drawn up with great 
care so as to avoid all possible future litigation. The document that follows is an 
example of this. 


1 pi HE-BAR 5a m,l Bfi-nd’id 
apil-5u 5a md Banitum(-turn)-ere5 
ina mulj-lii m Ina-qdt- d Nabu-5a-kin 
h qal-la 5a d n JA-ga-a-ga-5u 
5 ina arah ~Ayaru i-nam-din 
m lna-qa t- d Nabu-5a-k in 
it-ti md Hama5-iddin 
f Mu-5e-zib-ti 
u r Ba-bu-nu a-na eli 
10 ra-5u-tu-5u ul i-dib-bu-ub 

i 

hnulcinnu m Ki-din- d MarduJc apil-5u 
5a md Nabu-5um-uMn h dup5arru md Anum- 
ah-iddin 

apil-5u 5a rn Im-bi-ia Unik ,li 
ara l‘Arahsamnu umu 17 kam 5attu 16 kam 
15 d Nctbn-na > id 5ar Bdbili ki 


1 pi of barley belonging to Bel-na’id, 

the son of Banitum-eresli, 

to be paid by Ina-qat-Nabu-shakin 

the slave of Agagashu, 

in the month Iyyar he shall pay. 

Ina-qat-Nabu-shakin 

with Shamash-iddin, 

Mushezibti, 

and Babunu concerning 
his claim shall not go to law. 

Witness: Kidin-Marduk, the son 
of Nabu-shum-ukin. Scribe: Anum- 
ah-iddin, 

the son of Imbia. Erech, 

the 17th day of Marchesvan, the 16tli year 

of Nabonidus, king of Babylon. 


No. 17. Recobd of interest to be paid. 

Usury was a common practice of the Babylonian business world and the rate 

of interest for each transaction was fixed by documents such as the following. 

15 5iqil kaspi 5a md Nabu-zer-li5ir 15 shekels of silver of Nabu-zer-lishir, 

apil-5u sa m Na-din ina mah-Jn md Marduk- the son of Nadin, to be paid by Marduk- 
5um-iddin shum-iddin, 

1 The exact meaning of ma55artu is still uncertain. It seems to refer to a monthly stipend for temple 
officials. 


DOUGHERTY—ARCHIVES FROM ERECH 


29 


apil-su sa md Marduk-eriba a-di ara ’!Addaru 

lm-bii-li ul-tu ara b . 

5 ina muh-lii 1 ma-ni-e 8 siqlu Icaspi 
ina muh-ld-su i-rdb-bi 
h mu-kin-nu md Nabu-etir apil-su sa 
m Nalid- d Marduk 

md Nabu-sum-ukin apil-su sa m Nad-na-a 
10 u h dupsarru m Esi-etir 

apil-su sa md Nabu-sum-iskun(-un) 

TJruk u ara bKislimu 
umu 16 kam sattu 6 kam 
md Nabu-kud urri-usur. 


the son of Marduk-eriba. Up to Adar 

the interest from the month. 

upon 1 mina 8 shekels of silver 
upon it shall increase. 

Witnesses: Nabu-etir, the son of 
Na’id-Marduk, 

Nabu-shum-ukm, the son of Nadna, 

and the scribe, Eshi-etir 

the son of Nabu-shum-ishkun. 

Erech, the 16th day of 
Kislev, the 6th year 
of Nebuchadrezzar. 


No. 2G8. Money paid fob, digging a canal. 

Babylonia was supplied with a network of irrigation canals. It is likely that 
new canals were continually being dug and old ones cleared of sediment or re¬ 
paired after the bursting of a dyke. Special laborers were hired for this ditch work. 


3 1/2 siqil kaspi a-na hi-ru-tu 
ndri sa ina abulli d Adad 
m Ba-ni- ia md Sin-usallim 
md Marduk-nasir u md Nabu-sarr-a-ni 

5 h agarrutu me 110 ammatu 
i-lii-ir-ru-u 
1 1/2 siqle ba-ab-ti 

4 1/2 siqle a-na h agarrutu me 
sa ndra ina abulli d Adad 

10 i-hi-ir-ru-u m Zeri-ia 
apil md Na-na-a-ah-iddin 
ara ! l ^dbdtu umu 22 kam sattu 7 kam 
d Nabu-nd , id sar Babili M 


3 1/2 shekels of silver for the excavation of 
the canal which is at the great gate Adad; 
Bania, Sin-ushallim, 

Marduk-nasir and Nabu-sharrani, 
hired laborers, 110 yards 
shall excavate. 

11/2 shekels, the balance (of) 

4 1/2 shekels for the hired laborers, 
who the canal at the great gate Adad 
shall excavate, Zeria, 

the son of Nana-ah-iddin, (received). 

The 22nd day of Shabat, the 7th year 
of Nabonidus, king of Babylon. 


No. 408. Repokt of habyest money and hiee of labobebs. 

The temple had vast land holdings and many laborers were required to har¬ 
vest the products of fields, gardens and groves. This document indicates that 
there were gangs of 100 men under the direction of overseers. 

1/2 ma-na 5 siqil kaspi ri-U-it 1/2 mina, 5 shekels of silver, the balance 

eburi-su-nu of their field produce 

i The common rate of interest is indicated by the following oft-repeated statement in Babylonian 
contracts, sa arid ina muhlii 1 mane 1 siqil kaspi ina muhhisu irabbi, “monthly upon 1 mina 1 shekel upon 
it shall increase.” The Babylonian mina contained 60 shekels. A monthly increase of 1 shekel would mean a 
yearly inci’ease of 12 shekels, or 20°/ 0 . It is likely that the name of the month Sivan should be restored 
in the above document. This would mean an interest of 8 shekels for 8 months, if Sivan and Adar are 
not to be counted in making the computation. If they are to be included, the interest would be 8 shekels 
for 10 months, a little below the standard rate. 




30 


GOUCHER COLLEGE CUNEIFORM INSCRIPTIONS, VOL. I 


sa sattu ll kam 1\3 3 siqil kaspi 
ina kurummate zun -su-nu 
napbaru 58 Siqil kaspi a-na md In-nin- 
ahe me -iddin 

u md In-nin-ni-Sum-usur h rab 100 mes na-din 
5 5 siqle a-na i-di Sa 5 h agarrutu me 

sa ti-du a-na eli *? sa-ki-il-lu 
i-zab-bi-lu a-na md Na-na-a-ah-iddin 
apil-su sa m Ardi- d Nabu na-din 
aru, iDu’iizu umu 2 kam sattu J0 kam A Nabu-na’id 
10 sar Bdbili ki 


of the 11th year; 1/3 [mina], 3 shekels of silver 
out of their maintenance; 
total 58 shekels of silver to Innin- 
ahe-iddin 

and Inninni-shum-usur, chiefs of 100, are given. 

5 shekels for the hire of 5 laborers, 

who tidu 1 to the Sakillu 2 trees 

carry, to Nana-ah-iddin, 

the son of Ardi-Nabu, are given. 

The 2nd day of Tammuz, the 10th year of 
Nabonidus, king of Babylon. 


No. 269. Recobd of the peice of a hoese. 

The horse was used in chariots and wagons. There are also references to 
riding horses. In this record a partial payment is made for a horse and provision 


made for the payment of the balance 

2 ma-na kaspi ina 3 5/0 ma-na 
kaspi Umu isten(-en) sisi 
ru-uh-lju ina sise me * 
sa ina qat m Sum uhin 
5 apil m Bel-zer ab-ku-nu 

m Ba-zu-zu apil md 8amas-uballit(-it) 
u m Bu-gil-la-a-a 
apil m Ba-la-tu 
malj-ru ri-e-lji 

10 i 5/6 ma-na kaspi ina pa-ni-su-nu 
ina arak Kislimu i-nam-din 
ara1 iUlidu umu 4 kam sattu 8 lam 
d Nabit-na/id Sar Bdbili 1li 


three months later. 

2 minas of silver of 3 5/6 minas 
of silver, the price of one horse 
ruhhu 3 among horses, 
which from Shum-ukin, 
the son of Bel-zer, are brought, 
Bazuzu, the son of Shamash-uballit, 
and Uugilla, 
the son of Balatu, 
received. The balance, 

1 5/6 minas of silver at their disposal, 
in the month Kislev he shall pay. 

The 4th day of Elul, the 8th year of 
Nabonidus, king of Babylon. 


No. 206. Food given to woekmen. 

Labor was remunerated with food as well as with money. This record shows 
that a man and his son received one standard measure of dates as their sustenance 
for a month. 

1 gur suluppi kurummat-su-nu 1 kor of dates, their maintenance, 

sa id-tu umu 25 kam sa arat lNisannu which from the 25th day of Nisan, 

1 See qadu , MA p. 908, for equation IM-TIK = qadutum = tidu. Of. Br. 8401. The meaning of 
qadu, qadutu is “clay jar,” “earthen vessel.” HWB p. 581 connects ti-du with titum , the latter having the 
meaning “clay,” “loam.” It may be that tidu should be translated “loam,” carried to the sakillu trees for 
the purpose of enriching the soil. 

2 See MA p. 1026 for the term sakullu used as the name of a tree. 

3 Nbk 132:19 contains a reference to alpu ru-uh-hu-ti. It is difficult to determine the meaning with 
certainty. 


DOUGHERTY—ARCHIVES FROM ERECH 


31 


sattu 39 kam a-di umu 25 kam 
sa ara, iAyaru m Dan-nu- d Nergal 
5 h ka-sir l u maru-su 

Sa qand sil-li tab-ba-na-a-ta 2 
a-na Babili ki is-su-u 
it-ta-su-u 

arah Nisannu umu 25 kam sattu 39 kam 
10 d Nabu-kudurri-usur sar Bdbili ki 

No. 181. Expenditure 


the 39th year, to the 25th day 
of Iyyar, Dannu 'fNergal, 
the binder, and his son, 
who reed basket-work 
to Babylon brought, 
received. 

The 25th day of Nisan, the 39th year 
of Nebuchadrezzar, king of Babylon. 

MONEY FOR VARIOUS PURPOSES. 


This itemized statement indicates that a record was kept of the tasks per¬ 
formed by laborers and the money paid to them. 


1 1/2 siqil leas pi kurummate mn -su Sa 
arak Tebetu 

m Ardi-ia apil m Su-la-a iSsi(GlS) 

3 1/2 siqil kaspi ri-hi-ti 
kurummate zun sa 11 sabe mes ' Sa a-na 
5 eli kupri sap-ru 
m Ina-esi-etir apil-su 
sa md Na-na-a-ah-iddin issi(GIS) 

1 Siqlu md Nabu-nadin-ahi 
Sa ana eli qanati me Sap-ru 
10 ara bTebetu umu 16 kam sattu 24 knm 
a Nabu-kudurri-usur 
Sar Babili ki 


1 1/2 shekels of silver, his maintenance of 
the month Tebet, 

Ardia, the son of Shula, received. 

3 1/2 shekels of silver, the balance 
of the maintenance of 11 soldiers who for 
asphalt are sent, 

Ina-eshi-etir, the son 
of Nana-ah-iddin, received. 

1 shekel, Nabu-nadin-ahi, 
who for reeds is sent, (received). 

The 16th day of Tebet, the 24th year 
of Nebuchadrezzar, 
king of Babylon. 


No. 184. Money received for men who performed service for the king. 
Messengers and porters were in the constant employ of the temple. This 
document refers to three men who were paid for delivering something to the king. 


19 Siqil kaspi ina 50 siqil kaspi 
Sa arak Du'uzu sattu 22 kam 
a-na md Na-na-a-ab-iddin 
apil m Ar-rab m Amel- d Na-na-a 
5 apil m Balat-su u m Amel- d Na-na-a 
apil m Ali-DA GAL-qar Sa 
ri-ha-a-ta 3 a-na sarri 
is-su-u nadna(-na) 
a-na makkuri mabru(-ru) 
arak TiSntu umu 10 kam sattu 22 kam 
d Nabu kudurri-usur Sar Bdbili ki 

1 h lca-sir, from kasam (qasaru) = “to tie,” 
of basket making. 

2 With tab-ba-na-a-ta compare tab-ni-ti, 
“model,” “form,” “resemblance.” 

3 See note 3, p. 20. 


19 shekels of silver of 50 shekels of sil¬ 
ver, which in the month Tammuz, the 22ndyear, 
for Nana-ah-iddin, 
the son of Arrab, Amel-Nana, 
the son of Balatsu, and Amel-Nana, 
the son of Ah-DAGAL-qar, who 
rihata to the king 
brought, are given, 
for the treasury are received. 

The 10th day of Tishri, the 22nd year 
of Nebuchadrezzar, king of Babylon. 

“to bind,” seems in this context to be related to the work 

179:3. The meaning of Hebrew JV33n is “construction,” 


32 


GOUCHER COLLEGE CUNEIFORM INSCRIPTIONS, VOL. I 


No. 168. List op soldiers. 


This document makes it apparent that soldiers were apportioned to certain 
persons who needed them. At any rate a record was kept of the soldiers be¬ 


longing to an individual. 

md Na-na-a-karabi apil-su Sa 
m fiu-zu-bu apil md Na-na-a-ah-iddin 

v 

m Sum-usur apil md In-nin-zer-ibni 
m Kal-ba-a apil m Amel- d Na-na-a 
5 m Amel- d Na-na-a m Ta-qi$- d Gula 
napbaru 5 sabe mes 
sa md Na-na-a-karabi 

apil m Tab-Sar . 

aral iKislimu umu 17 kam sattu 32 kam 
10 d Nabu-ltudurri-usur sar Bdbili ki 


Nana-karabi, the son of 
Skuzubu, son of N ana-ah-iddin, 
Shum-usur, the son of Innin-zer-ibni, 
Kalba, the son of Amel-Nana, 
Amel-Nana, Taqish-Gula, 
total, 5 soldiers 
of Nana-karabi, 

the son of Tab-Sar. 

The 17th day of Kislev, the 32nd year 
of Nebuchadrezzar, king of Babylon. 


No. 205. Record concerning three tablets. 


The statements in this document indicate that a record was kept of the clay 
tablets or contracts which were drawn up for different individuals. The temple 
scribes who were skilful in writing the cuneiform language were doubtless in 
great demand when documents or letters had to be prepared. Such a list as is 


here given may have been simply f< 
on a certain day. 

V 

1 duppu ina pani md Samas-sum-iddin 
apil md Nabu-baldt-su-iqbi 
1 dappu ina pani md Ndbu-etir apil 
md Ea-iddin 

1 duppu ina pani m Ardi- d Bel 
apil md Aamas-iddin 
5 ara h Tisritu umu 5 kam 
sattu 12 kam 
d Nabu-lmdurri-usur 
Sar Bdbili ki 


the tabulation of the documentary output 

1 tablet at the disposal ofShamash-shum-iddin, 
the son of Nabu-balatsu-iqbi, 

1 tablet at the disposal of Nabu-etir, the son 
of Ea-iddin, 

1 tablet at the disposal of Ardi-Bel, 
the son of Shamash-iddin. 

The 5th day of Tishri, 
the 12th year 
of Nebuchadrezzar, 
king of Babylon. 


No. 338. Money paid for the hire op laborers. 

Exactness in Babylonian temple accounts is indicated in this document. An 

official record had to be made of the sources of the money paid to laborers, in 

this case, gate revenue and the price of two oxen. Eor other references to gate 

revenue, or toll money, see Nos. 273, 288, 309, 315, 356, 359, 360, 384 and 404. 

44 siqil kaspi a-di 19 siqle malj-ru-u 44 shekels ofsilver, including 19 former shekels, 

Sa idtu umu 10 kam Sa ara, i Ululu 2 kam which from the 10th day of second Elul 




DOUGHERTY—ARCHIVES FROM ERECH 


33 


a-di umu 29 kam sa ara1 i Ululu 2 kam 
a-na qu-up-pu sa babi i-ru-bu 
5 6 siqil kaspi sa ina simi 2 cilpi-i 

arddni me 

ina qdt m Sa- d Nabii-i-Ml-Urn na-sa-a 
a-na i-di sa h agarruta me 
a-na m U-qu-pu 
u md Na-na-a-ab-iddin na-din 
10 arah Ululu 2 knm umu 29 kam 

sattu 10 kam d Nabu-na’id sar Bdbili ki 


to the 29th day of second Elul 
in the box of the gate entered; 

6 shekels of silver, which out of the price of 
two work oxen 

from Sha-Nabu-ishallim are brought; 
for the hire of workmen 
to Uqupu 

and Nana-ah-iddin are given. 

The 29th day of second Elul, 

the 10th year of Nabonidus, king of Babylon. 


No. 384. Ship and gate receipts. 

Ships and boats also contributed to the revenue of Babylonian temples. This 
probably came from the payment of fare or freight. It is interesting that ship 
and gate receipts are mentioned together in this document. For other references 


to ship receipts see Nos. 298 and 404. 
silver. 

1 112 ma-na kaspi 1 siqlu ribatu(-tu) 
hurasi ir-bi sa *felippi 
sa ? uMt kus$ti 

1/2 ma-na 5 siqil kaspi ir-bi 
5 sa qu-up-pi-e sa babi 
araI i3abatu umu 25 kam 
sattu 5 kam d Nabu-ndld 
sar Bdbili ki 


Ship revenue consisted of gold as well as 

1 1 /2 minas of silver, 1 shekel and a quarter 
of gold, the income of the ship 
of the temple vestment; 

1 /2 mina 5 shekels of silver, the income 
of the box of the gate. 

The 25th day of Sliabat, 
the 5th year of Nabonidus, 
king of Babylon. 


No. 71. Receipt for three iron sickles. 


The value of this text is the clue it gives to the meaning of NIG-GAL-LA , 
when used in the sense of an iron instrument. 


3 NIG-GAL-LA' parzilli 
a-na e-si-du 
sa sam-mu ina pdni 
m Ri-mut 

5 h M U sa K1L alpi 
arak Addaru umu 25 kam 
sattu 36 kam 
d Nab ii-kudurri-usur 
sar Bdbili ki 


3 sickles pf iron 

for the harvesting 

of grass [are] at the disposal of 

Rimut, 

the servant of the ox enclosure. 
The 25th day of Adar, 
the 36th year 
of Nebuchadrezzar, 
king of Babylon. 


1 Various suggestions have been made as to the meaning of NIG-GAL-LA in the sense of a metal 
implement. See ZK II p. 325 and p. 414. As an instrument for harvesting grass it seems to be connected 

with Hebrew bi)?, Arabic Syriac = “sickle.” The Semitic root ^3 may be borrowed from Sumerian. 


34 GOUCHER COLLEGE CUNEIFORM INSCRIPTIONS, YOL. I 


No. 350. Payment of shif laborers. 

This document evidently refers to men on the bank of a stream pulling a 


ship or boat by means of a rope. 

15 Siqil kaspi a-na h agarrutu me 
Sa Oelippe™* 8 a-na Sip-par 
i-Sad-da-du m ZJ-ba-ru 
it md Samas-zer-ibni 
5 it-ta-Su-u 

arak Ayaru umu 25 kam Sattu ll kam 
d Nabu-nd'id Sar Babili ki 


15 shekels of silver for the hired laborers, 

who the ships to Sippar 

draw, Ubaru 

and Shamash-zer-ibni 

received. 

The 23rd day of lyyar, the 11th year 
of Nabonidus, king of Babylon. 


No. 154. Receipt for two coats of mail and sesame. 


This document is interesting because it shows that protective garments and 
food were furnished to those who took care of fowls under the direction of the 


chief caretaker. 


The element of danger in the work intimates that it was carried 


on in some district outside the city. 

2 S . n! “ u sir-a-am me 
12 qa SamaSSammi m Esi-etir 
[apil m ] Li-ku-nu u m Ri-mut 
apil m(1 Nabu-ium-ukin 
5 Sa a-na m Tdb-sar- d Innina 
h re'u is-sur 
a-na re’u-u-tu 
na-dan it-ta-m-ii 
ara l i Ayaru umu 17 kam 
10 sattu 39 kam 

d Nabu-kudurri-usur 
Sar Babili ki 


2 coats of mail, 

12 qa of sesame Eshi-etir, 
the son of Likunu, and Rimut, 
the son of Nabu-shum-ukiu, 
w T ho to Tab-shar-Innina, 
the keeper of fowls, 
for the work of tending (fowls) 
are given, received. 

The 17th day of lyyar, 
the 39th year 
of Nebuchadrezzar, 
king of Babylon. 


No. 294. Donkey and flour furnished for a journey. 

A glimpse is given in this record of a man about to travel to a distant part 


of the country. Money is advanced 

his sustenance on the journey. 

50 Siqil kaspi a-na 
1 imeri alakti(A- 0 UB-BA ) 1 
it a-na qimi(ZID-DA)-Su 
a-na md Nabumusetiq-urra 
5 apil md lStar-na-din-ahi 


to pay for his means of transportation and 

50 shekels of silver for 
1 road donkey 
and his flour 
to Nabu-mushetiq-urra, 
the son of Ishtar-nadin-ahi, 


1 Cf. Br 11494. The sign BA simply represents the overhanging vowel of A-GUBA. 


DOUGHERTY—ARCHIVES FROM ERECII 


35 


Za a-na mA ‘Te-ma-a 1 
sap-ra na-din 

aral iAddaru umu o kam sattu o kam 
d Nabu-na’id sar Bdbili ki 


who to the land of Tema 
is sent, are given. 

The 5th day of Adar, the 5th year 
of Xabonidus, king of Babylon. 


1 Cf REN 134:4,5. Delitzsch in Wo lag das Paradies? p. 301 f, discusses Al Te-ma-a-a and connects it 

witli Xtt'fi, Jeremiah 25:23, Job 6:19, and iL*.V>, a city in Arabia southeast of Petra, of known importance 
as early as 500 B. C. Consult Hastings, Dictionary of the Bible, Vo]. IV. p. 694, and Hogarth’s The Pene¬ 
tration of Arabia, p. 280 ff. That Tema, or Teima, was “on the old route from the Gulf of Akabah to the 
Persian Gull” and “a dividing point of roads from Petra to Gerra (on the Persian Gulf) in the east and 
Sheba in the south,” indicates that it was an important stopping place for caravans. It is called Qai,ua on 
Ptolemy’s map ol Arabia Felix. For a map showing the land surface features of Arabia see at the close 
of Hogarth's The Penetration of Arabia. The line of oases, within easy reach of one another, stretching 
from the Euphrates river to Teima, should be noted. An exceedingly interesting indication of the ancient 
culture of Teima is a monument known as the Teima Stone. See Cooke’s North Semitic Inscriptions , p. 
19o ft. The script is that of “the early part of the middle period of Aramaic writing,” and the contents deal 
with the introduction of the worship of a foreign deity. Cooke says, p. 197, “Caravans (Job 6:19) on their 
way to Egypt or Assyria halted here; and the influence of commerce with these two countries is evident in 
this stone: the name of the priest’s father is Egyptian, the figures of the god and his minister ai’e Assyrian.” 
For a photograph of the stone see Hogarth’s The Penetration of Arabia, opposite p. 282. 

In the Chronicle of Cyrus concerning the reign of Nabonidus and the fall of Babylon it is recorded 
that Nabonidus was in Te-ma-a in the 7th, 9th, 10th and 11th years of his reign, while the son of the 
king (i. e., Belshazzar), the princes and soldiers were in mAt Alckadu. See Transactions of the Society of 
Biblical Archaeology , Vol. VII, p. 156 ff. Pinches, ibid. p. 171, connects nl Tc-ma-a with Te-e ki sa ki-ir-ba 
Babili ki and Tu-ma, ki shown on a map of Babylon, ibid. p. 152. Aside from the difficulty of equating 
" l Te-ma-a with Te-e kl , and Tu-ma ki it is stated in the chronicle that the king did not go to Babylon, thus 
intimating that he was at a place outside the city. Furthermore, the statement that the king was in al Te-ma-a 
is followed by the counterstatement that the son of the king was in mnt Alckadu, i. e., the country of Akkad, 
which included the city of Babylon. These statements can best be harmonized by the inference that the 
king was not in Akkad and that nl Te-ma-a must be sought without the bounds of that country. Cf. Tiele, 
Babylonisch-Assyrische Geschichte, Part 1, p. 470; and BA Vol. 2, pp. 236 f. 

Additional proof is furnished by the fact that when the king’s mother died in the 9th year of his 
reign, one of the years when he was in Al Te-ma-a, he is not mentioned as taking part in the mourning 
which was observed in Akkad. Another link in the chain of evidence is REN 134, dated in the 10th year of 
Nabonidus, when he was in Al Te-ma-a, referring to the food of the king as having been taken to mAt Te-ma-a. 
The term mat Tc-ma-a cannot refer to a district in Babylon. Two royal leases of land are contained in REN. 
No. 11, dated in the 1st year of Nabonidus, was obtained from the king himself, while No. 150, dated in 
the 11th year of Nabonidus, when he was at At Te-ma-a, was obtained from Belshazzar who is mentioned by 
name. That Al Te-ma-a and mAt Te-ma-a refer to the Arabian city Teima and its environs can hardly bo 
doubted. Ill Rawlinson, The Cuneiform Inscriptions of Western Asia, 10 No. 2, associates ,tl Te-ma-a-a 
with Ma-as-’-a-a-a and ' d Sa-ba-’-a-a-a. Cf. Kcilinschriftliche Bibliothek, Band II, p. 20 line 53. Ge¬ 
nesis 25:13—15 gives the names of the sons of Ishmael, and the list includes Massd and Tema. The al Sa- 
ba-’a-a-a may well be the Sabeans of Job 1:15. Cf. Delitzsch Wo lag das Paradies? p. 303. Isaiah 21:13—14 
presents an interesting view of the position of Teima as a prosperous city in the desert of Arabia. The 
term XD'O is equivalent to mnt Te-ma-a. 

These facts indicate a hitherto unsuspected condition of affairs during the reign of Nabonidus, the 
last king of the Neo-Babylonian Empire. If Nabonidus spent much of his time at Teima in Arabia, it is 
quite possible that the northern and central sections of Arabia were under his rule. In approximate di¬ 
stances Teima is 250 miles southeast of Petra, 200 miles northwest of Medina, and 150 miles from the Bed 
Sea. It may have been the political center from which Nabonidus governed his Arabian province, while 
Belshazzar looked after affairs in Akkad. All this corroborates and gives added significance to the position 
occupied by Belshazzar as an energetic and masterful crown prince. The most interesting revelation, however, 
is the fact that Arabia w r as intimately connected with Babylonia in the 6th century B. C. 


36 GOUCHER COLLEGE CUNEIFORM INSCRIPTIONS, VOL. I 
No. 401. Receipt for flour given to servants consecrated to the god bel. 


The sirke, i. e., consecrated servants of Bel referred to in this document, were 
menials of the temple of that deity. They were detailed for a certain work, in 
return for the performance of which they received flour as food. 


30 qa qi-mu sa a-na 
Hirke (PA-KAB-D U me ) Sa d Bel 
sa a-na eli alpe me 
kip-ru-nu id-di-nu 
5 m Zer-bi-bi mabir(-ir) 
arak Tebetu umu 8 kam 
Sattu 9 kam d Nabu-na’id 
Sar Bdbili ki 


30 qa of flour which to 

the consecrated servants of Bel, 

who for oxen 

are sent, they gave, 

Zerbibi received. 

The 8th day of Tebet, 
the 9th year of Nabonidus, 
king of Babylon. 


No. 161. Garment given to a consecrated servant. 


This record shows that the class of temple servants known as the sirkutu, 
referred to in the preceding document, received clothing as well as food. 


1 l uUt KUB-RA 

Sa a-na 8 ma-na sipdte zun 

na-sa- 

a-na md Bel-e-te-ru 
5 h sir-ki na-din 

araI iTcbetu umu 9 kam 
Sattu 36 kam 
d Nabu-kudurri-usnr 
sar Bdbili ki 


1 KUB-BA garment, 
which for 8 minas of wool 
is brought, 
to Bel-eteru, 

the consecrated servant, is given. 
The 9 th day of Tebet, 
the 36th year 
of Nebuchadrezzar, 
king of Babylon. 


No. 361. Dedication of an individual as a consecrated servant of ishtar. 


A tablet in the Yale Babylonian Collection, REN 116, refers to two records 


of the sirkutu, one kept by the temple 

is an interesting example of the kind of 

m La-a-lci-pi sa m Ardi-ia 
apil md Nergal-ndsir belu-su 
a-na Hirkutu (PA-KAB-DU-u-tu) 
a-na d Belit sa Uruk ki 
5 id-di-nu-us 

aral ‘Addaru umu 8 kam sattu 7 kam 
d Nabu-mVid sar Babili ki 


and one by the nobility. This document 

record kept by the temple. 

Lakipi, whom Ardia, 
the son of Nergal-nfisir, his lord, 
for the sirkutu 

to the Belit of Erech (i. e., Ishtar) 
gave. 

The 8th day of Adar, the 7th year 
of Nabonidus, king of Babylon. 


DOUGHERTY-ARCHIVES FROM ERECH 


37 


No. 322. Receipt for the tithe oe Belshazzar. 

This record throws light upon the Babylonian custom of paying a tithe for 
the maintenance of the temple. Even members of the royal family participated 
in this practice. 


1 ma-na kaspi es-ra-u 
sa md Bel-sar-usur mar Sarri 
m Su-la-a apil-su Sa md E-a-sum-iddin 
ina E-an-na ma-hi-ir 
ara b Ululu umu 29 kam sattu 5 kanl 
A Nabu-na'id sar Babili ki 


1 mina of silver, the tithe 
of Belshazzar, the son of the king, 
Simla, the son of Ea-shum-iddin, 

a. 

in Eanna received. 

The 29th day of Elul, the 5th year 
of Nabonidus, king of Babylon. 


No. 355. Money paid a messenger sent to Belshazzar, etc. 

It is known that Belshazzar exercised an authoritative influence over affairs 
at Erech, which was consonant with his high rank as crown prince and his appar¬ 
ent equality with his father in governmental matters. Hence the interest that 
attaches itself to this document. 

2 siqil kaspi a-na md Dan-nu-aJje me -su-ibni 2 shekels of silver to Dannu-ahe-shu-ibni, 


apil md Ner<jal-uballit (-it) sa a-na 
pa-ni mar sarri sap-ru 
3 siqil a-na la-bi-nu sa libnati* wl 
a-na m La-a-ba-si 
ara \D\duzu umu 7 kam sattu 9 lcam 
d Nabu-nd’id sar Bdbih ki 


the son of Nergal-uballit, who to 

the son of the king (i. e., Belshazzar) is sent; 

3 shekels for the making of bricks 

to Labashi (are given). 

The 7th day of Tammuz, the 9th year 
of Nabonidus, king of Babylon. 


NAME INDICES. 


Abbreviations: d., daughter; f., father; gf., grandfather; gs., grandson; h., husband; 
m., mother; s., son; w. wife. 

Determinatives: til, city; d, god; goddess;/; feminine; h, amelu, denoting occupation; 
lei, place; m, masculine; mat, country; me, ones, plural; vtiir, canal; ttimirtu, vicinity; zun, 
collective. 


Personal Names. 

Ad-la-ma, f. Btima. 

A-ga-a-ga-su(?), 276:4. 


A-hu-lap-ia, 1 s. Bel-Sum-iSkun, 57:3; 259:4; 
415:3. 

Ab-it-tab-si, f. Iqisa. 

Ab-DAGAL-qar(?), f. Amel-Nanti. 
Abe me -sa-a, Ahe me °-sa-a, 

1. s. Bel-iqisa, 10:5. 

2. f. Eanna-sum-ibni, Zen a. 

3. h . . lia-ra-du-u-a, 219:3. 

Abe me . ..., f.. . . . etir. 

Aim . ..., f. Amel-Nanti. 

Alju-si, f. Nabu-btini-abi. 

Abu-su-nu, s. Rimfit, 306:3. 

Alm-u-tu, gf. Nadin. 
r A-mat-a, 35:3. 

Amel- d Ea, gf. Nabii-ldsir. 

Amel-malalm, 240:9. 

A.mel- d Nabu, f. Samas-ana-biti-su. 
Amel- d Na-na-a, 

1. s. Aim .... 253:4 

2. s. Ali-DAGAL-qao\?), 184:6. 

3. s. Baltitsu, 2:10; 184:4. 

4. s. Bel __ 80:18. 


5. s. Nanti-iddin, 250:7. 

6. s. Tabnea, 180:2. 

7. s. Taqis-Gula, 168:5. 

8. s. Ztikir, 36:6; 55:8. 

9. f. Ardi-Innina, Kalbti, Nabu-ab-iddin, 

v 

Nanti-alj-iddin, Samas-uballit. 

10. 22:3; 151:2; 207:9; 241:8. 
Amel-sa-ttibti zu,n -su, f. Bel-uballit. 

Amel- d .. . ., f. Kalbti. 

Am-me-ni-ilu, 226:8. 
d Amurru-il-tu-lu-ii, f. Innina-zer-ibni. 
d Amurru-ri-man-ni, f. Eanna-ibni. 
d Amurru-zer-ibni, s. Sin-iddin, 251:14. 
d Amurru-u-se-zib, f. Nabu-usallim. 
Ana-biti-su, s. Nanti-ejms, 80:13. 
Ana-eli- d Bel-a-miir, f. Eanna-ibni. 
Ana- d Istar-talc-lak, d Innina, 87:6; 254:3. 
Ana- d Nabu-tak-lak, 4:4. 

An-da-hir, gf. Nergal-asarid. 
d A-nu-eres( r es), f. Su-ti-ba-ni. 
d A-nu-zer-ibni, s. Nabu-ah-iddin, 80:7. 
d A-nu-um-iddin, s. Ardi-Innina, gs. Supe-Bel, 
398:27. 

d Anu-ab-iddin, s Imbia, 276:12. 


1 That A-hu-dan-ia (Cf. REN p. 15) is not the correct reading is indicated in TNN p. 302. See 
ahuldp(i), HWB and MA. REN p. 15 records the name A-di-ma-ti- d Istar and wliat should be read 
A-hu-lap- d I star. The two names have the same meaning. 

(38) 








DOUGHERTY—ARCHIVES FROM ERECH 


39 


d Anu-sum-ibni , s. Innina-zer-usaibsi, 279:9. 
Ap-la-a, Apla-a , 

1. s. f. Vddi/?, 237:13. 

2. s. Arrabtum, f. Musezib-Bel, 65:11; 
231:11; 236:12;248:9; 262:11. 

3. s. Marduk-na sir, gs. Kidinu-Marduk, 
233:3. 

4. s. Nabu-mudammiq , 96:13. 

5. s. Sin-liq-unmnni , f. Innin-zer-usabsi , 
376:6. 

6. s. Sin-tabni, f. Samas-zer-lisir, 390:2. 

7. f. Bdnia, Iqisa, Kalba, Liisi .. .., Vd- 
din, Nabu-ahe-iddin, Nabu-bani-ahi, 
Nabu-etir, Slamas-sum-ukin, Sarid, 
Sulci. 

8. f., 198:12; 233:11. 

9. 397:9. 

fA-hat-su-nu, 381:5. 

A-qar-ahu, f. Nabu-na'id. 

A-qar-aplu, 

1. s. Bel-apal-usur, f. Nergal-nasir, 6:10. 

2. s. Nabu-nasir , 81:3. 

3. f. Nergal-nasir. 

Ardi-ia, Ardi-id, Ardi-a , 

1. s. Manna-ala-Arba’il, 280:4; 308:2; 
334:3. 

2. s. Ncmia, 80:9. 

3. s. Nergal-nasir, 361:1. 

4. s. 181:2. 

5. f. Gimillu, Hanbaqu, Innin-Up-usur, 
Nand-kardbi. 

6. 59:2; 126:3; 286:3. 

Ardi- d Bel, 

1. s. Egibi, f. Nabu-etir-napstiti, 353:11; 

419:10. 

v 

2. s. Samas-icldin, 205:3. 

3. f. Ina-esi-etir , Nabu-etir-napsati , 
mas-iddin ,.... iddin. 

Ardi- d E-[ci\ , gf. Marduk-sapik-zer 
Ardi- d In-nin, 

1. s. Ezupasir ( Ezupalrir ), 207:3. 

2. s. Nabu-na'id , 333:11. 

, v 

3. f. Innin-sum-usur, Samas-zer-ltsir. 

4. h nappabu , 75:4. 

5. 130:3; 333:3,4; 387:2. 


Ardi- d Innina, d lnnina(-na), 

1. s. Amel-Nana, 363:2. 

2. s. Gimillu, 229:14. 

3. s. Kunct, 12:3; gs. Nabu-sarM-ildni, 

6 : 11 . 

4. s. Nabu-sum-ukm, 48:4. 

• 5. f. Anum-iddin, Bel-etir, Gimillu, Ki- 
ribtum, Nddin. 

6. 67:4; 80:17. 

Ardi- d ln-nin~ni, s. Musallim-Marduk, 244:9. 
Ardi- d Nabu, 

1. s. h NI-SUR gine, f. Baldtu, 95:11; 
398:3.7,29. 

f. Nabu-bani-ahi, 233:17; 261:15. 

2. s. Riheti, 57:4. 

3. f. Baldtu, Kidinu.Nabii-iGallimNandi- 
ah-iddin, .... 397:2. 

4. Mffc, 87, 5; 191:6. 

5. 35:4; 408:8. 

Ardi- d Na-na-a, h MU sa KIL alpe, 53:5. 
Arcli- d Nergal, 417:17. 

Ar-rab, 

1. s. Bel-upabhir, 80:6. 

2. s. Samas-alj-iddin, 396:9. 

3. f. Nana-ah-iddin. 

4. 210:10; 234:8; 255:8. 

Ar-rab-ti, tu, turn, 

1. f. Nabu-kdsir, Nabu-usallim. 

2. gf. Musezib-Bel, 

A-sa-ag-gi-i, f. Samas-sar-usur. 
h askapu, gf. Nabu-kisir. 
h aslaku, f. Ibni-Innina, gf. Sumd. 
h asu, gf. Marduk- sum-ibni. 

h bddiru, gf. Bania , Bel-ibni, Nabu-ibni, Pir\ 
Ba an . . . ., 1:3. 

Ba-bi-ia, s. Gudadii, 5:5. 

Ba-bu-nu, 276:9. 

Ba bu-tu, gf. Kiribtu, Kurbanni-Marduk, . . .. 
Marduk. 

Ba-bu-ut-ti, gf. Nddin. 

Ba-la-tu, Baldtu, 

1. 's .Ardi-Nabu, 188:5; 221:1; 387:13; 
gs. h NI-SUR gine, 95 :11; 398:3, 7,8, 
15, 16, 20, 21, 29. 

2. s. Hunzu, f. Sin-ibni, 279:13. 






40 


GOUCHER COLLEGE CUNEIFORM INSCRIPTIONS, VOL. I 


3. s. Innin-sum-usur, 329:3. 

4. s. Musezib-Bel, 418:16; h mar sipri sa 
Sum-ukin, 327:5. 

5. s. Nabu-etir, 234:13; 241:22. 

6. s. Nabu-gamil, 285:5. 

7. s. Nabu-sum . . . 347:5. 

8. s. Sin-ibni, gs. h re’u alpi, 380:18. 

v 

9. s. Suma, 340:4; gs. Iddin-Papsukal, 
236:10. 

10. s. Suzubu , h naggar '?elippe, 402:14. 

11. f. Ilu-gilla, Gimillu, Biheti, . ... ea. 

12. h mar sipri, 39:7. 

13. 1J0:10(?). 

Ba-lat-su, 

1. s. Ardi-E-[a] , f. Marduk-sdpik-zer, 
257: 12. 

2. s. Ardi-Nabu, 228:12. 

3. s. Mandidi, f. Nadin, 236:4. 

4. s. Na .. . ., 81:7. 

5. s. Nab it-upabb ir, 232:2. 

6. f. Amel-Nand , Bel-upabhir, Ibni- 
Innina,Innin-zer-usabsi,Marduk-sum - 
ibni, Mardah-sum-lisir, Nabu-masetiq- 
urra , Nana-iddin, Hamas-ab-iddin. 

7. h KTJR- TJD-D1M- JJ-A, 37:2. 

8. h rab sir-ku, 38:3. 

9. 83:8; 293:4; 403:6. 

Ba-ni-ia , Ba-ni-id, Bani-ia, Bani-ia, 

1. s. Ad-la-ma, 352:7. 

2. s. Apia, 270:5; 317:3. 

3. s. Tabnea , gs. h ba l iru ) 113:12; 117:3. 

4. s. Taribi, 291:4. 

5. s. Nabu-baldtsu-iqbi, gs. Sin-liq- 
unninni, 353:13. 

6. s. Nadna, 292:4. 

7. s. Nergal-usezib, 392:9. 

8. s. S'arid. 165:2. 

9. h agarru, 268:3. 

10. 289:6. 

d Bdni-tum-eres, 

1. f. Bel-na’id, Bel-ni-e-du. 

2. 126:4. 

Bdm-tu-su, f. Suzubu. 

BAN-KAK- d Bel, s. Manias . . . ., 250:9. 
Ba-si-ia, gf. Sum-ukin. 


Ba-zu-zu, 

1. s. Nadin , 307:16. 

2. s. Samas-uballit, 269:6. 

3. s. fca-Nabu-su, 281:8. 
d Ba-u-ab-iddin, f. Samas-sum-iddin. 
d Bau-ah-eres, 4:21. 

d Bel-abu ...., 53:11. 
d Bel-ab-eriba(?), 405:2, 18. 
h Bel-ah-iddm , f. Iddin-Marduk. 
h Bel-ahe-eriba, 

1. s. Bel-kasir, 172:7. 

2. s., 152:3. 

3. f. Nabu-eteru, Sin-iddin, Sin-usallm. 

4. 239:7. 
d Bel-abe-iddin, 

1. s. Nabu-zer-ibni, 34:2. 

y 

2. s. Nur-Sin,i.Samas-mukm-\zer], 390:8. 
d Bel-dhe-iqisa(-sa), 

1. s. Egibi, 241:6; {.Nadin, : 12 ;380;15; 
394:13; 412:15. 

2. 54:2; 260:7,8. 
d Bel-aJj-usabsi(-si), 

1. s. &a-pi-Bel, 56:4. 

2. f. Guzanu. 

d Bel-apal-usur,gi.Bel-iddin,Nabu-etir-napsdti, 

Nergal-ndsir . zer-usabsi. 

d Bel-epus(-us), f. Zala .... 
d Bel-eriba, f. Nabu-kasir, Biketi. 
d Bel-e-te-ru, etir, 

1. s. Ardi-lnnina, 70:2. 

2. s. Nabv-sar . . . 1:5. 

3. Hirku , 161:4. 

4. 1:6. 

d Bel-hu-us-sa-an-ni, 92:6. 
d Bel-ibni, 

1. s. Bullut,4:l5:ll\gs. h ba > iru, 65:12;394:8. 

2. s. Kuri, f. Samas-iddin, 403:9. 

3. s. Nabu-iddin , 15:3. 

4. f. Innin-zer-usabsi. 

5. h kudimmu , 135:6; 251:6; 395:3. 

6. 58:10; 331:2; 342:14; 370:7; 386:10. 
d Bel-iddin, 

1. s. h asu, f. Marduk-sum-ibni, 261:3. 

2. s. Marduk-zer-ibni , gs. Bcl-apal-usur, 
65:13. 





DOUGHERTY—ARCHIVES FROM ERECH 


41 


3. s. Nabu-etir, 35:1. 

4. s. &igua, f. Marduk-eriba, 113:17; 
236:16. 

5. f. Nabu-ncCid. 
d Bel-iqbi, s. Nadna, 6:16. 
d Bel-iqU-a(-Sa), 

1. s. Bel-apal-usur, f. Nabu-etir-napMti, 
66:16; 237:12. 

2. s. Nabu-kasir, gs. Mr-Sin, 397:12. 

3. s. h pahharuf.&amakbani-ah z',407:18,21. 

4. f. Abe-sa, Nabu-etir-napSati, Taribi. 

5. 62:3. 

d Bel-ka-sid-a-a-bi, 198:7. 
d Bel-kasir, 

1. f. Bel-ahe-eriba. 

2. 172 :3, 4. 

d Bel-li , u, s. Mukin . .. ., gs. Sin-liq-unninni, 
95:4. 

d Bel-na-din-aplu, s. Zer-Bdbili M , gs. IU'- 
Marduk, 231:12; 233:15; 248: 11. 
d Bel-na-sir, s. Zer-ukin , gs. h massar abulli, 
394 :3. 

d Bel-ni-e-du , wd’id, 

1. s. Banitum-ereS, 276:1; 390 :4. 

2. s , h qallu sa Nabu-Sar-asur, 307:7; 
403:1. 

4Z?e/-[n’-man]-m, s. h mandidi, f. Sa-Nabii-Mi, 
385:13. 

d Bel-8ar-usur , mar sam, 322 : 2. 
d Bel-$am-iSkun(-un ), 

1. s . Dabibi, f. Marduk-etir, 15:19; f. 
Nabu-nadin-kirn, 6:5. 

2. s . Enurta-ah-iddin, gs. Hangu . . . ., 
58:12. 

3. s. Kurt, f. Nadinu, 407:22. 

4. s. Nabu-gdmil, 392: 6. 

5. f. AJmldpia. 
d Bel-Su-nu, 

1. s. Nabd-abe-iddin, gs. Egibi, 95:10; 
113:13; 175:3;189:9;233:19;236:13; 
237:9; 261:13; 262:12. 

2. 199:9; 278:4. 
d Bel-TUK-KUR-u-a, 405:14. 
d Bel-uballit(-it), 

1. s. Amel-Ea, f. Nabu-kiitir, 279:2. 


2. s. Amel-sa-tabti zlln -hi, 243:4. 

3. s. RTtsw, 42:3; 92:3. 

4. s. Sum-ukin, 173:5. 

5. f. Ibni-Innin. 

6. 54:1. 
d Bel-u3allim, 

1. s. Eriba, gs. Epekilu, 385:1. 

2. f._,58:12. 

3. 385 : 2, 10. 
d B el-up) ahhir(-ir), 

1. s. Balatsu, 201:4. 

2. f. Arrab, lbni-lstar. 

3. h nappah parzilli, 47:3. 

4. 223:6. 

d Bel-u-k-zib, f. Nabu-kim-lisir. 
d Bel-zer, Bel-zer, 

1. s. Basia, f. Sum-ukin, 167:2; 413:3. 

v 

2. f. Sum-ukin. 

3. 110:6. 
d Bel . ..., 

1. f. Amel-Nana. 

2. 123:3; 172:14. 

Bu-u-su, f. Bel-uballit. 

Bul-lu-tu, Bul-lut, 

1. s. h bahru,f. Bel-ibni, 65: 12; 394:8. 

2. f. Bel-ibni. 

Bul-lut-a, 

1. s. Nand-ibni, 3:6. 

2. f. Ina-ek-etir. 

Da-bi-bi, gf. Marduk-etir, Nabu-nadin-kim. 
Bamqi(DAN)-a, s. Nabu-ah-iddin, 30:2. See 
Ncibu-mudammiq and Samas-mudam- 
miq. 

d Dan-nu-alie-tiU-etir, 

1. s. j Rimutu, h pusd, 412:1. 

2. 412:9. 

d Dan-nu-abe-ki-ibni, s. Nergal-uballit, 355:1; 
414:4. 

Dan-nu- d Nergal, 

1. f. Samakali-iddin, Isinnd. 

2. h kasir, 206 :4. 
d Dajdn-abe-iddin, 

1. s. Gimillu, gs. Sigua, 353:9. 

2. 387:6. 

d Dajan-ere$, 297:7. 





42 


GOUCHER COLLEGE CUNEIFORM INSCRIPTIONS, VOL. I 


Dajan- d Marduk, 

1 . h rab bani, 243: 2. Written h rab Ha-m-e. 

2. 45:3; 417:7, 9. 

Di-ka-na-a-a, s. Nergal-ibni. 

E-a ....,83:8. 

E-an-na-ibni , 

1. s. Ana-eli-Bel-amur , 403:3. 

2. s. Amurru-rimanni, 365:2. 

3. s. Iddia, 279:11. 

4. s. Ina-silli-Nana, 377:6. 

5. f. Rimut. 

6. h MUUti, 240:6. 

7. 67:6. 

E-an-na-li-pi-usur , lip, 

1. s. Tdbia, gs. Kidin-Marduk, 418:14. 

2. f. Nabu-mukin-aplu. 

3. 4:7; 306:5; 402:5. 

E-an-na-him-ibni, 

1.8. Abe-M , 231:15; 237:15; 248:12; 

412:18. 

2. 249:16. 

d Ea-kur-ban-ni, 326:2. 
d Ea-iddin, f. Nabu-etir. 
d Ea-$ar-bid-lit, 272:3. 
d E-a-8um-iddin, f. /SWa. 
d Ea-zer-iqi$a(-$a), 212:9. 

E-gi-bi, gf. Bel-hmu, MuMllim-Mar dull, Nabu- 
abe-iqiSa, Nabu-etir-napMti, Nadin, 
Zeria • 

E-kur-za-kir, gf. Marduk-etir, Muranu, Muse- 
zib, Nabu-bani-alii, Nabu-bel-sunu. 
Enlil-Mpik-zer, h TlK-EN-NA, 94:11. 

d Enurta-ah-iddin, s. Hangu . f. Bel-him- 

iSkun, 58:13. 

d Enurta-$ar-usur, h qipu , 15:5. 

Epe$(-e$)-ilu , gf. Bel-uMUim. 

Eriba(-ba), s. EpeS-ilu, f. Bel-uSallim, 385:1. 
E-rib-hi, 230:10. 

Eh-etir, 

1. s. Nabu-him-ihkun, 17 :10. 

E-til-lu, him, 

1. f. Marduk-zer-ibni. 

2. 260:8, 10. 

E-til-pi, s. Sadunu, gs. Hangu AN-NA 398:26. 
E-zu-pa-lir , or E-zu-pa-hir, f. Ardi-Innin. 


Gi-mil-lu, Gimillu, 

1 . s. Ardia, 52:3; 77:7; 93:4; 100:4; 

142:3; 149:9; 171:3; 182:4; 183:3; 
219:5; 228:6; 247:10; 253:12; 

321:3; 366:3; 410:7. 

2. s. Ardi-Innina, 323 : 3. 

3. s. Balatu. 63:13. 

4. s. Kuna, 6:13. 

5. s. Marduka, 80 : 14; 249 : 6. 

6. s. Marduh-han-usur, gs.. 63:27. 

7. s. Nergal-iddin, 392: 7. 

8. s. Nergal-esi-etir, gs. Hangu AN-NA, 
398:4. 

9. s. Riljeti. 250:5. 

10. s. Sigua, f. Dajdn-abe-iddin, 353:10. 

11. s. Zeria, gs. &igua, 95:8; 113:11; 
189:8; 213:2; 262:10. 

12. f. Ardi-Innina, Kalbd, Nergal-nasir. 
13.8:4; 32:3; 64:4; 76:3; 82:5; 85:4; 

87:7; 90:5; 99:5; 101:3; 102:4; 
103:5; 104:3; 107:5;115:3;116:5; 
117:6; 118:3; 119:4;129:4;136:3; 
138:3; 139:3; 143:3;148:4; 202:9; 
220:6; 224:10; 226:3; 235:11; 254:8; 
410:8; 420:2. 

Gimil- d Na-na-a, 

1. gf. Innin-Sar-usur, Marduk , Marduk- 
him-iddin, Nabu-et/ir-napSati. 

2. 58:2. 

h GIG, f. Kinena. 

Gu-da-du-u, f. Bahia. 

G TJR-D U- d Nergal, 84 :8. 

Gu-sa-a, 351 : 5. 

Gu-za-nu, 

1. s. Bel-alj-ukibh, h mdr hprisa Marduk- 
eum-iddin, 410 : 2. 

2. h isparu , 409 : 5. 

3. 387:11. 

Ea-an-ba(?)-qu, s. Ardia, 380:4, 8. 
Halaqu{EA-A)-ia-a-nu, 351 : 5. 

Ha-nap, gf. . . . . bdni-abi 
Ha-si-ru, s. Nabu-ab-iddin, 80:12. 
tBi-li, m. Nidinti. 

Hu-un-zu-u, gf. InninaHar-usur, Iiti-Samah 
balatu, Nergal-hm-iddin, Sin-ibni. 






DOUGHERTY—ARCHIVES FROM ERECH 


43 


Ib-na-a , lbna-a, 

1. s. Egibi, f. Zeria, 380:13. 

2. s. Ekur-zakir , f. Nabu-bdni-abi, 94:4; 
113:15. 

3. f. Nabu-balatsu-iqbi , Nabu-bdni-abi, 
Nabu-zer-iddin. 

4. 302:4. 

Ibni- d Innina, Innina(-na ), 

1. s. h aSlaku, 242:4; f. 261:17; 

412:17. 

2. s. Balatsu, 35:11. 

3. s. Bel-uballit , 24:3. 

4. s. Marduka, 336:3. 

5. s. Nabii-zer-ukin, 81:9. 

6. s. Nergal-uballit, 199:13. 

7. s. Nergal-usallim, 133:4; 229:1. 

8. s. Rhnfit, 157:5. 

9. s.Supe-Bel,i.Anum-mukin-aplu, 398:28. 

10. s. 80:11; 85:3; 302:4. 

lb-ni- d lstar, Ibni, 

1. s Naslaku, f. Sum a, 189:12; 262:14; 
353:15; 394:11; 419:14. 

2. s. Bel-upabbir , 357:3. 

3. s. Marduka , h nappabu, 385:5. 

4. f. tSumd. 

Ibni . . . ., 

1. s. 97:3. 

2. s. TaqiS-Gida, 308:5. 

3. 80:21. 

Id-di-ia, f. Eanna-ibni. 

Iddin- d Marduk, 

1. s. Bel-ab-iddin, 66:3, 7. 

V 

2. f. mm .... 

Iddin- d Nergal , f. Isinnd. 
lddin- d Bapsukal, gf. Baldtu. 

Iddin . . . ., 266:3. 
llani mes . . . ., 258:5. 

Uani™™-iddin, s. Nabu-uSallim, 63:17, 22. 
llu-gil-la-a-a, s. Baldtu, 269:7. 
Ilu-na-dan-nu, f. Itti-ildni-ia. 

11$- d Marduk,D A,ID- GAL,giBel-nddin-aplu. 
fll-su-nu{?), d. /S'nZd, w. Bel-ukdlim, 385:2; 11. 
Im-bi-ia, 

1. s. Eanap, f. d . .. Mni-alji, 307 :4. 

2. f. Anu-ab-iddin. 


3.415:17. 

fIm-mir-tu, 381:8. 

Ina-E-sag-ila-zer, s. Sa-pi-Bel, 310:6. 
Ina-esi-etir, 

1. s. Ardi-Bel, 382:3. 

2. s. Bel-apal-usur , f. . . ... zer-usabsi, 
418:13. 

3. s. Bulluta, 239:5. 

4. s. Hunzfi, f. Nergal-Mm-iddin, 353:5. 

5. s. Lihiinu, 154:2. 

6. s. Nabu-uSabsi, 239:4. 

7. s. Nabu-zer-iqi$a, 406:3. 

8. s. Nand-ab-iddin, 94:8; 181:6. 

9. s. Nand-ereS, 237:4. 

10. f. Innina-abe-iddin, Nabu-abe-ukdUrn, 
Nergal-sum-iddin, SamaS-mudammiq. 

11. 75:5; 130:5; 344:8. 
Ina-qdt- d Nabn-M-kin, 276:3, 6; 381:6. 
Ina-silli- d Bel, 407:9. 

Ina-sil-lu- d Bel-ab-nu, 55 : 6. 
Ina-sd-lu- d Na-na-a, silli, 

1. s. Nab fi-abe-uSallim, 413: 5. 

2. s. Nand-kardbi, 258:2. 

3. f. Eanna-ibni, Nand-kardbi, Nana .... 
usur. 

4. 239:8. 

Ina-silli- d Nergal, 

1. h agarru killi, 160:1. 

2.105:5; 110:2; 137:3; 147:4; 150:4; 
151:8; 159:3; 203: 8. 
d In-nin-abe-iddin, 141:8; 244:11; 408:3. 
d In-nin-ahe . . . ., s. Rimfit, 234:11. 
d ln-nin-lip-usur, s. Ardia, 400:13. 
d ln-nin-mukin-aplu, s. Nabn-zer-iqisa, 248:3. 
d In-nin-$ar-usur, 

1. s. Nergal-usallim, 177:6. 

2. s . MU-A, gs. Gimil-Nand, 18:8. 

d In-ninSum-ibni, h naSpatri, 399:3. 
d ln-nin-Sum-usur, 

1. s. Ardi-lnnin, 409:2. 

2. s. Innin-zer-usabSi, 230:2. 

3. s. Mukin-zer , 393:7. 

4. s. Nand-ereS, 398:2, 9, 10, 17, 21, 23. 

5. f. Baldtu, Nand-ah-iddin. 

6. 80:8; 91:5; 399:3. 




44 


GOUCHER COLLEGE CUNEIFORM INSCRIPTIONS, YOL. I 


d In-nin-tab-ni-usur , s. Giniil-Nand, f. Nabii- 
etir-napMti, 403:13. 
d In-nin-zer-ibni, 

1. s. Kinend, 80:3. 

2. s. Rimut, 169:3; 249:7. 

3. f. Nadina-abu, khwi-usur. 

4. 416:2. 

d In-nin-zer-iqi§a(-$a), 

1. s. Nabu-bel-sunu, h naggaru, 416:4. 

2. s. Nadnd , 250:12. 
d In-mn-zer-usdbsi(-si ), 

1. s. gs. Sin-liq-unmnni, 376:5. 

2. s. Bel-ibni, 316:5. 

3. s. Baldtsu, 86:7; 95:13; 126:5; 233:18; 
261:16. 

4. s. fiunzu, f. Itti-SamaS-balatu, 353:6. 

5. s. Nand-kardbi , 65:15; 247:3; 249:5; 
260:17. 

6. s. 275:2; 307:3; 346:2. 

7. f. Innin-him-usur. 

8. h nappab siparri, 415:8. 

9. 80:5. 
d hi-mn .. . 

1. s. Nana . . . ., 99:2. 

2. 131:4; 190:4; 396:12. 
d Innina-ah-iddin, 

1. s. Nabu-muZetiq-urra, 339:11. 

2 . 68 : 2 . 

d In-nin-na-abe-iddin, s. Lia-eM-etir ? 341:3. 
d Innina-a-lik-pdni, s. Sarid, 204:2. 
A Innina-mukin-aplu , 

1. s. Zerta, 419:12. 

2. s. 128:3. 

3. h naggaru, 409:8. 

d Innina-ri-su-u-a. 379:10. 
d Linina-sar-'itsur,s.KiLdurni,gs.Hunzu, 353:2. 
d Innina-$um-ere$, 

1. s. Nabu-Sum-ultin, 420:4. 

V 

2. s. iSanias-zer-ibni, 155:6. 
d Innina-$um-ibni, d Innina{na), 

1. h kudimmu, 135:5; 251:6. 

2. 409:4. 

,l Innina-hm-nsur, s. TUR-Bel-da-nu, 39:5. 
d In-nin-ni-Zum-usur, 408:4. 
d Innina-zer-xbni, Innina{-na ), 


1. s. Amurrn-il-iu-lu-u, 277:2. 

2. s. Nabu-usallim, 250:6. 

3. s. Rimut, 94:2. 

4. h arad ekalli, 409:7. 

5. 396:6. 

d Innina-zer-usabSi(-Si), d lnnina{-na), 

1. s. Baldtsu, 189:11. 

2. f. Anu-sum-ibni. 

3. h sangu, 255:3. 

Jq-ba-a, 67:4. 

Iqisa(-$a), Iqisa(-8a)-a, 

1. s. Apia, 33:3. 

2. s. Ah-ittabH, 22 :4. 

3. s. BabutuJ. Kurbanni-Marduk, 260:3. 

4. s . ea, 66 :14. 

5. s. h re’u, 262:13, f. klamaS-mudammiq, 
113:14; 231:13; 162:3; 236:14. 

f. Tarib, 65:14. 

6. s. h re l ualpiS.Samas-mudammiq,‘2'il-.\\ ; 
238:11; 248:10. 

# 

7. f. Kind, Nabii-baldtsu-iqbi, Nabu- 
mukin-aplu, Nurea, SamaS-mudammiq. 

8. 302:5; 405:11. 

I-sin-na-a-a, 

1. s. Dannu-Nergal, 216 :2. 

2. s. Iddin-Nergal, 239 :11. 

3. VeY/, 109:11; 140:2; 241:7. 
I-SB d Amurru-liHr, 372:1. 

[ h iSparu], f. Zeria. 
d lUar-ab-iddin, 

1. s. Nabii-musetiq-urra, 320: 6. 

2. h re’ll issurdti‘ nn , 387:19. 

d Pdar-dlik-pdni, 253:7; h asaridu, 364:3. 
d iMar-dur-e-du, 179:2. 
d IStar-e-du-usur, Hirku, 125:6. 
d Istar-nddin-ahi, f. Nabu-musetiq-urra. 
d Idar-sar-usur, s. Rimut, 279:4. 
d l§tar-8um-ibni, 386 :11; h kudimmu, 395 :3. 
d IHar-zer-ibni, 

1. s. &uld, 385:15. 

2. 370:7. 

d lstar-zer . . .., s. Nabu-alj-iddin, 271:3. 

d IUar . 4:6; 342:14. 

Is-sur, 

1. s. Nabu-etir-napsdti, 371 :4. 





DOUGHERTY—ARCHIVES FROM ERECH 


45 


2. 318:5. 

Itti-JE-an-na-bu-di-ia, 1 

1. h re’u immere, 160:3. 

2. 226:2. 

It-ti-ildni-ia, Itti, 

1. s. Ilu-nadannu, 319: 4. 

2. h naggar daldti , 379:7. 
Itti- d Marduk-baldtu, 11 IIU-KAK, 78:4. 
ltti- d Nabb-baldtu, s. Nabu-admit, 94:12. 

v 

Itti- d SamaS-baldtu, s. Innin-zer-uSabH, gs. 

Hunzu, 353:6. 

Itti-lar-ini-ia, 211:3. 

Kal-ba-a, Kalba-a, 

1. s. 229 :8; h dalu, 109: 5. 

2. s. Amel-Nand, 168 :4. 

3. s. . . . ., 253:5. 

4. s. Gimillu, 208 :6; 209 : 6. 

5. s. Lakipi, 397:11. 

6. t. / SamaS-Sum-iddin. 

7. h aSaridu, 296: 3. 

8. 7 ‘ tl-MUK, 371:2. 

9. 207:10. 

Kal{?) Nergal-usallim, 229 :1. 

Kalbi . . . ., f. Nabu-epuS. 

Kab-ti-ia, s. 7, ra& bdni, f. Tabnea, 217 :4. 
Ka-lu-mu , f. Nabu-him-iddin. 

Ki-i- d Nabu, h qallu Sa Ardi-Nabu, 35 : 3. 
.Ki-i-sarri-li’ii, 413:12. 

Ki-Sik- d Nabu, s. gs. ea, 385:14. 

Ki-di-nu, 

1. s. Ardi-Nabu, 330:4. 

2. s. Sadfinu , gs. Lultanmir-Adad, 257:1. 

3. 257:5. 

Ki-di-nu-Harduk, Ki-din, 

1. s. Nabu-sum-ukin, 276:11. 

2. s. &adfnm,gs.Lultammir-Adad,257:9. 

3. gf. Apia, Eanna-lipi-usur, Nabu-zer- 
iddin. 

4. 29:2. 

Ki-na-a, 

1. s. Iqisa, 405: 6. 

2. s. klammaljanni, 117 :13. 

3. s. Baxi-ilu, 256 : 4. 

4. s. Zeria, 345:2; 389:5. 

1 “With Eanna is my responsibility.” 


5. f. Nabu-baldtsu-iqbi. 

6. 373:7; 402:6; 10, 21. 

Ki-ne-na-a-a, 

1. s. Man . . . ., 108: 9. 

2. f. Innin-zer-ibni. 

3. h GlG, 87:3. 

Ki-rib-tu, turn, 

1. s. Ardi-Innina, 279 : 3. 

2. s. Nadin, gs. Babdtu, 66:1, 7, 10. 
Kud-a-a , 387:13. 

Kud-da-a,218 :4. 

Kud-di-ia, s. Nand-eves, 229 :9. 
Kit-du-ra-nu,s.Nabu-Mzib-anni,2$0 :3; 392.13. 
Kudurru , 

1. s. Ekur-zdkir,LNabf(-bel-s i unu,S85\l(x 

2. s. Hunzu, f. Innina-sar-usur, 353: 3. 

3. s. Nabu-Sum-iddin, 35:10. 

4. s. Nabti-taqbi-liSir, 229 : 5. 

5. f. LdbaH, Nergal-zer-ibni , Suzubu, 
Tukulti-Marduk. 

6. h re'u sattukki, 11:2; 121:3. 

7. 61:3. 

Kid-la-a, 35:9. 

Ku-na-a, 

1. s. Nahu-sarlri-ilani, f. Ardi-Innina, 6:11. 

2. f. Ardi-Innina , Gimillu. 

3. 4:8 (?) 

y 

Kuri-i, gf. Nadinu, SamaS-iddin. 
Kur-ban-ni- d Marduk, 

1. s. gs. Babdtu, 260:2. 

2. 260:12. 

Kut-ti-ilu, f. Nabd-epuS. 

La-a-ba-U, La-ba-si, 

1. s. Kudurru, 207 :11; 387:15. 

2. h malahu, 240:11. 

3. 96:12; 290:4; 355:5. 

La-a-ki-pi, La-ki-pi, 

1. f. Kalba. 

2. 361:1. 

Lib-lut, 

1. h nappahu, 228:11. 

2. 387:10. 

Li-ku-nu, f. Ina-esi-etir. 

Li-H-ru, s. Nabu-etir-napMti, 289 : 3. 






46 


GOUCHER COLLEGE CUNEIFORM INSCRIPTIONS, VOL. I 


Lu-ul-ta-am-mi-ir- d Adad, Lul-tam-mi-ir, gf. 

Kidinu, [Kidinu]-Marduk. 
Lu-mur-du-un-qu- d Istar, 55 : 3. 

Lusi . . . s. Apia, 397 : 3. 

Man-di-di, h man-di-di, gf. Sa-NabuHu, Nddin. 
Man (?) Ki... . a-a. 

Man-na-nu, f. Pasta. 

Man-na-a-ki-i-Ar-bd--il, Ar-ba-il, Ar-bi-il, 

1. f. Ardia. 

2. 241:17. 

Mar-dale, 

1. s. Babutti, f. Nddin, 6:12. 

2. s. Marduk-nasir, gs.Gimil-Nand, 95:12. 

3. s. Nadnd, 6 : 14. 

4. s. Nabu-ah-iddin, 15:17. 

5. s. SamaS-ibni, h irrisu, 19:5. 

6. f. Nabu-sum-ibni. 

7. 4:6. 

Mar■ dak-a, 

1. s. Nand-ibni , 3:6. 

2. f. Gimillu, Ibni-Innina, Ibni-Istar. 

3. 387:3. 
d Marduk-eriba, 

1. s. Bel-iddin, gs. tiigua, 113:16; 236:15. 

2. f. Nabu-apal-iddin, .... iddin. 

3. 32:4. 
d Marduk-etir, 

1. s. Bel-sum-iskun, gs. Dabibi, Hangu 
Banna, 15 :18. 

2. s. Musezib, gs. Ekur-zdkir, 257:3. 

3. s. Nergal-etir, 108:4. 

4. Hangu Banna, 15:6. 

5. 14:4; 257:5. 
d Marduh-nasir, 

1. s. Gimil-Nana, f. Marduk, 95:12. 

2. s. Kidinu-Marduk, f. Apia, 233:3. 

3. f. Nabu-sum-ltsh. 

4. 1l agarru, 268:4, 
d Marduk-sa-mu, 4:9. 

d Marduk-8apik-zer, s. Balatsu, gs. Ardi-Ba, 
257:11. 

v 

d Marduk-kirr-a-ni, s. Talhn, gs. Sandtia, 
260:15. 

d Marduk-Sum-ibni, 

1. s. Balatsu, 78:13; 187:8. 


2. s. Bel-iddin, gs. h asu, 261:3. 

3. 78:6. 

d Marduk-sum-iddin, 

1. s. Nabu-baldtsu-iqbi, 230:4; gs. Gimil- 
Nand, 233:13, 261:11; 262:9. 

2. s. Nergal-ndsir, 245:3. 

3. Ha-qu 410:4. 

4. 193:9. 

d Marduk-him-USir, 

1. s. Balatsu, 208:5; 296:2. 

2. 331:3. 

d Marduk-sum-usur, s.. f. Gimillu, 63:26. 

d Marduk-zer-ikni, 

1. s. Bel-apal-usur, f. Bel-iddin, 65:13. 

2. s. Etillum, 164: 3. 

3. Hangu Adad, f. Musallim-Marduk, 
262:3. 

4. f. Musallim-Marduk. 

5. 57:5; 156:2. 

d Marduk . . . ., s. Babiitu, L ... . Marduk, 
66:13. 

d Marduk (?)...., 199:3. 
h massar abulli, gf. Bel-ndsir. 

Mi-sir-a-a, gf. Aainas-ah-iddin. 

Mukm-aplu, s. Zerta, 380:16. 
Mukin-$um,s.Sin-Uq-unninni,f.Nabu-u$allim, 
189:4. 

Mukin-zer, 

1. s. Nddin, 185:2. 

2. f. Nabu-Sum-iddin, Nddin, Nana-iddin, 
Innin-sum-usur. 

3. 177:5. 

Mukin . ..., s. Sin-Uq-unmnni, f. Bel-Udu, 95:4. 
Muk-ki-e, 396:13. 

Mu-ra-nu, 

1. s. Nabu-bdni-alii,gs.Ekur-zdkir, 380:16. 

2. s. Nabu-etir, 392:5. 

Mu-ra-su-u, 387:11. 

Mu-sal-lim- d Marduk, Musallim, 

1. s. Marduk-zer-ibni, 164:5; gs. Hangu 
Adad, 262:3. 

2. Taqis-Gula, gs. Egibi, 65: 5. 

3. f. Ardi-lnnini. 

Mu-se-zib, Musezib, 

1. s. Ekur-zakir, f. Marduk-etir, 257:3. 










DOUGHERTY—ARCHIVES FROM ERECH 


47 


2. s Nergal-epuS, gs. Ekur-zdkir , 257:7. 
Mu-se-zib- d Bel, Musezib, 

1. s. Apia, gs. Arrabtum , 65:10; 231:10; 
236:12;248:8; 262:11. 

2. s. Rhnut-Ea , f. Nahu-bani-ahi ,407:1,9; 
f. SamaS-zer . . . ., 307 :1. 

3. s. Sum-uldn, 385:12. 

4. s. 3amas-mudammiq , 324:3. 

5. s. zer-iddin , 187 :4. 

6. f. Balatu. 

7. h kudimmu, 325:2. 

8. h nappahu, 132: 4. 

9. h nappah parzilli, 194:4. 

10. 212:6; 407:10. 

Mu$ezib- d Nabu, 352:10. 
fMu-le-zib-ti, 276:8. 

AVaS-[pzr]-fatm, f. .... 

Aa .. .., f. Balatsu. 

Nd'id- d Istar, 

1. s. Nadnd, 107:4; 304:4. 

2. s. Rimut, 312:5. 

Na'id- d Marduk, f. Nabu-etir. 
d Nabn-ah-eres, f. Sum-ukin, 
d Nabu-ah-iddin, 

1. s. Amel-Nana, 109 :3; 241:8. 

2. s. h a§kapu, f. Nabu-kisir, 117:11. 

3. s. Nabu-nishur, 393:3. 

4. s. Nabu-dala\ 352:2. 

5. s. Nabu ... ., 280: 3. 

6. f. Anu-zer-ibni, Damqia, Easiru, Mar- 

V ^ 

zer . .. ., Marduk, Sold. 

7. 18:3; 211:4; 241:21. 
d Nabii-ah . . . ., 241:8. 
d Nabu-aie-biddut, bullut, bullit, 

1. s. Nana-a'i-iddin, 304:2. 

2. gs. 8a-Nabu-$u, 260 :4. 

3. 88:1; 199:6; 260:14. 
d Nabu-ahe-eriba, 

1. s. Sum-ibni, 63:12. 

2. 63:8, 19. 
d Nabu-ahe-iddin, 

1. s. Apia, 33:5. 

2. s. Egibi, f. Bel-kunu, 95:10; 113:13; 
189:10; 233:19; 236:13; 237:10; 
261:13; 262:12. 


3. f. Nabu-etir. 

4. 110:3; 256:3; 392:17. 
d Nabu-ahe-su, 4:11. 
d Nabu-dhe-usallim, 

1. s. Ina-eli-etir, 6:17. 

2. s. Nabu-mudammiq, 252 : 13. 

3. s. Rihe[tu], 80 : 16. 

4. s. Zeriitu, 207 :6. 

5. s. . . . aSezib, 170:5. 

6. f. Ina-silli-Nana, Nabf<(?)-kun-ereS, 
Nadina-ahu. 

7. 65:3. 

d Nabu-alj,e ....,63:3. 

v 

d Nabu-a-ku-usur, h qallu sa Sida, 308:11. 
d Nabu-apal-iddin, s. Marduk-eriba, 417:2, 3 

6 , 11 . 

d Nabu-balat-su-iq-bi, iqbi, 

1. s. Gimil-Nana, f. Mardak-thim-iddin, 
233:14; 261:12; 262:9. 

2. s. Ibna, 86:5; 250 : 14. 

3. s. Iqisa, 63:4, 16, 19, 20. 

4. s. Kind, 303 : 2; 395: 7. 

5. s. Nana-e-res, 231 : 3. 

6. s. Sin-liq-iinmnni, f. Bania, 353:14. 

f. Nabu-bdni-abi, 233 : 20; 394:10; 

412:19; 419:11. 

7. s. , f. Sama8-sum-iddin , 63 : 24. 

8. f. Marduk-Sum-iddin, Nabu-bdni-abi, 
Sama8-8um-iddin, Taddan-am. 

9. 58:14; 190:5; 387:7; 396:10. 
d Nabu-bdni-ahi, 

1. s. Ahu-si , 165:6. 

2. s. Apia, 229 :10. 

3. s. Ardi-Nabu,gs. h NI-SURgine, 233:16; 
261:14. 

4. s. Ekur-zakir, f. Muranu, 380:17. 

5. s. lbnd , 94:15; gs. Ekur-zdkir, 94:4; 

113:15. 

6. s. Musezib-Bel, gs. Rhnut-Ea , 407 :1, 
9, 15, 17. 

7. s . Nabu-baldtsu-iqbi, 293:3; 313:2; 
378:3; gs. Sin-liq-unmnni, 233:20; 
394:9; 412:19; 419:11. 

8. s. Rhnut-Ea, f. Samas-ah-iddin, 407:3. 

9. s. Samas-zer-iqisa, 201 : 3. 











48 


GOUCHER COLLEGE CUNEIFORM INSCRIPTIONS, VOL. I 


10. 36:10; 241:20; 247:6. 
d Nabu-bel-su-nu, 

1. s. Kudurru, gs. JEJkur-zakir , 385:16. 

2. s. Ndbu-sar-ahe-su, 210:6. 

3. s. Nabu-usabsi , 207 :5. 

4. f. Innin-zer-iqisa, Nininnu-sum-ibni. 
d Nabu-bul-[lut]-an-ni, 348:3. 
d Nabu-da-la-\ f. Nabu-ah-iddin. 

d Nabu-e-du-usur, 213:8. 
d Nabii-e-id-ru , 239: 6. 
d Nabii-epus(-us), 

1. s. Kalbi . . . ., 56: 3. 

2. s. Kutti-ilu, 400:13. 
d Nabu-eres, 

1. f. Nabu-mudammiq. 

2. 1 : 7. 

d Nabu-e-te-ru, etir, 

1. s. 110:7; 387 :12. 

2. s. Ea-iddin , 205:2. 

3. s. Na’id-Marduk, 17 : 7. 

4. s. Nabu-ahe-iddin, 54:4. 

5. s. Nabii-sum-ibni, 291:3. 

6. s. Nergal-ndsir, gs.a-paZ, 380:2. 

7. f. Balatu, Bel-iddin, Mur aim. 

8. 239: 6;' 352:4,11; 380:7. 

V&& a-etir-n apsa ti, 

1. s. Ardi-Bel, 218: 6; gs. Egibi, 353 :11; 
419:9. 

2. s. Bel-iqi$a, 155:2; gs. Bel-apal-nsur, 
66:15; 237: 12. 

3. s. Innin-tabni-usur , gs. Gimil-Nana , 
403:12. 

4. s. Sigua, 6:9. 

5. f. Issur, Li sir u, Zerbibi. 

r] Nabu-ga-mil, f. Balatu , Bel-sum—iskun, Itti- 
Nabu-balata, $ula, Zeria. 
d Nabu-ibni, s. Bullut , gs . h bti’iru, 394:8. 
d Nabu-iddin, 

1. f. Bel-ibni , Rimut. 

2. h UR-GAM, 180:4. See 4/8672. 
Ndbu-iq-bi, iqbi, 

1. s. Nadnd, 6:16. 

2. s. Nergal-sum-ibni, 112:4. 

3. 175:4, 5. 

1 Cf. REN p. 29, note. 


d Nabu-kardbi, 4: 10. 

A Nabu-kasir, 

1. s. Arrabti, 178:3. 

2. s. Bel-eriba{?), 21 :3. 

3. s. Nur-Sin , f. Bel-iqzsa, 397 : 13. 

4. 21:5; 351:6. 
d Nabu-ki-sir, 

1. s. Bel-uballit, gs. Amel-Ea , 279:1. 

2. s. Nabu-ah-iddin , gs. h askapu , 117:10. 

3. s. Zerbdmtum, 39 :4. 

4. f. Nabu-zer-usabsi. 

5. 27:3; 218:4. 

d Nabu-kudurri-usur, sar Babili ki , 1:9; 2:13; 
passim. 

d Nabu-lu-u-sa-lim, h aslaku , 271:2. 

& Nabu-mit-ri, 351:4. 
d Nabu-mudammiq (BAN ), 1 

1. s. Nabu-eres , 195:10. 

2. s. 8amas-zer-ibni, 282:4; 284:4; 295:2; 
369:3. 

3., f. Zena, 15:14. 

4. f. .4p/a, Nabu-ahe-usallim. 

5. 80:21. 

d Nabu-mukm-aplu, 

1. s. Eanna-lip-usur, 415:13. 

2. s. 305: 3. 

3. s. Ealti-ilu, 15S: 1. 

4. s. /Wa, 392:4. 

5. s. Zeria, gs. h . . . ., 407:19. 
d Nabu-mukin-zer, f. Nabu-smn-lisir. 

V t 

d Nabu-mukin Samas-zer-ibni. 

A Nabu-nnisetiq-urra. 

1. s. Balatsu, 317: 5. 

2. s. Istar-nadin-ahi , 294:4. 

3. s. Rimut, 241:18. 

4. s. Samaia, 267 : 2. 

5. s. ibni, 418:6. 

6. f. Innina-ah-iddin, Istar-ah-iddin, 
Nulinti. 

7. h mdr sipri sa Taribi, 150 :2. 

8. 417:15. 
d Nabu-na’id, 

1. s. Aqar-ahu, 108: 6. 

2. s. Bel-iddin, 15:1. 









DOUGHERTY—ARCHIVES FROM ERECH 


49 


3. s. Nabii-zer-ukm , 108:2. 

4. s. r Za .... ti, 250: 8. 

5. f. Ardi-Innin. 

6. sar Bdbili 263 :6; 264: 7; passim. 
d Nabii-na-dan-nu, f. Nabii .... 

d Nabu-nadin-ahi, 

V ^ 7 

1. f. Sum-iddin. 

2. 181:8. 

d Nabii-nddin-aplu, s. £7?^fa&m,f.$^a,403:10. 
d Nabu-na-din-sum, 

1. s. Bel-sum-iskun, gs .Dabibi, Hatammu, 
6:5. 

2. f. Sum-iddin. 
d Nabii-nasir, 

1. s. Zabida, 146: 2. 

2. f. Aqar-aplu, Zeria. 

3. 351:6. 

d Nabii-ni-is-hur, f. Nabii-ah-iddin. 
d Nabii-ri-man-ni, 149:3. 
d Nabii-sar-hi-ildni, gf. Ardi-Innina. 
d Nabu-sar-ahe-su, 

1. f. Nabu-bel-sunu. 

2. 212:13. 

d Nabu-sarr-a-ni, h agarra, 268:4. 
d Nabu-sar-usur, 

1. Haqii sarri, h belpiqitti Banna, 380:11; 
394:6; 403:2; 419:7. 

2. 307:8, 11, 15; 332:3; 345:4; 367:3; 

411:3. 

d Nabu-sar . . .., f. Bel-etir , Sum-usur. 
d Nabu-se-im-me-e, f. Sum-usur 
d Nabii-sum-eres, 

1. s. Nabii-usallim, 84:11. 

2. 348:3. 
d Nabu-sum-ibni, 

1. s. Marduk, 252:19. 

2. f. Nana . . . ., Nabii-etir. 
d Na b ii-sum-iddin , 

1. s. Kalumu, 108:3. 

2. s. Mulcm-zer, 6:15. 

3. s. Pir\ 250:11. 

4. s. Supe-Bel, f. Sin-ahe-bullut , 398: 25. 

5. s. Zibi, 197: 7. 

6. f. Kudurru. 
d Nabii-sum-iskun(-un ), 


1. f. Bsi-etir. 

2. h AD-BIT, 396 : 14. 
d Nabu-sum-lisir, 

1. s. Bel-usezib, 259:3. 

2. s. Marduk-nasir, 245:4. 

3. s. Nabu-mukin-zer, 228:5. 

4. s. Nadna, 35:12. 

v 

5. f. Sadimu, 

6. 241:5. 
d Nabu-sum-ukm, 

1. s. Nadna , 17:9. 

2. s. '‘was pafri, 398:24. 

3. f. Ardi-Binina,Bmina-sum-eres,Kidin- 
Marduk, Rimiit. 

4. 162:7; 193:3, 10; 387:17. 
d Nabu-sum ...., 

1. s. Nand-eres , 36 : 1. 

2. s. h sangu d Zariqu, 201 : 6. 

3. s. Nullum, 19 : 4. 

4. f. Balatu. 

d Nabu-su-zib-an-ni, f. Kuduranu. 
d Nabii-taq-bi-lisir, f. Kudurru. 
d Nabu-upahhir(SAB-ir), f. Balatu. 
d Nabii -usabsi(-si), 

1. s. Nabii-zer-ukin, 153:4. 

2. f. Bia-esi-etir, Nabii-bel-sunu. 

3. 239:9. 

d Nabu-u-sal-lim, usallim, 

1. s. Ardi-Nabii, 405 : 2. 

2. s. Amurru-usezib, 113:4. 

3. s. Arrabtu, 56:5; 172:10. 

4. s. MuMn-sum, gs. Sin-liq-unninni , 
189:4. 

5. s., gs. h re'ii sattukki, 394:12. 

6. f. Ildni-iddin, Binina-zer-ibni. 

7. 210:5; 306:4, 9; 405:13, 18. 
d Nabii-u-se-zib, 

1. h rab bcibi, 386:2. 

2. 278:3. 

d Nabii-zer-ibni, f. Bel-ahe-iddin. 
d Na b ii-zer-iddin , 

1. s. Ibna, 84:5. 

2. s. Nand-eres, gs.Kidinu-Marduk, 233:4. 

3. 10:4. 

d Nabu-zer-iqisa{-sa), 





50 


GOUCHER COLLEGE CUNEIFORM INSCRIPTIONS, YOL. I 


1. f. Ina-esi-etir, Innin-mukin-aplu. 

2 . 4 : 8 . 

d Nabu-zer-ltsir, s. Nadin, 17:1. 
d Nabu-zer-ukin, 

1. f. Ibni-Innina, Ndbu-na'id, Nabu- 
usdbsi. 

2. 4:3; 78:7; 210:4. 

d Nabu-zer-usabsi(-si), TIL, 

1. s. Nabu-kisir, 117:8, 14. 

2. 109:8. 

d Ndbu-zer ....9:4. 
d Nabii .. .., 

1. s. Nabu-nadannu, 108 : 5. 

2. s. Zabdia, 108:1. 

3. f. Nabu-ah-iddin. 

4. 25:6; 418:1. 

Nddina(-na)-aku, 

1. s. Innin-zer-ibni, 72:7; 238:11. 

2. s. Nabu-ahe-usallim, 383 : 2. 

3. 73:3. 

Nddina(-na)-aj)lu, 

1. s. Niirea, 80:15. 

2. s. &um-uhin, 125:3; 290 : 7. 

3. f. Silme. 

4. 141:10. 

Na-di-nu, Na-din, 

1. s. An-da-hir, f. Nergal-asarid, 15:15. 

2. s. Apia, 198:12; 218:9; 245:2; gs. 
Ahutu, 237 : 13. 

3. s. Ardi-Innina, 368:2. 

4. s. Babutu, f. Kiribtu, 66 :2. 

5. s. Balatsu, gs. Mandidi, 236 : 3. 

6. s. Bel-ahe-iqisa, gs. Egibi, 353:12; 
380:14;" 394:13; 412:15. 

7. s. Bel-sum-iskun, gs. Kuri, 407 : 22. 

8. s. Marduk, gs. Babutti, 6:12. 

9. s. Nand-eres , 301 : 13. 

10. s. Nergal-sum-ibni, 234:12. 

11. s. h U f. $amas-uballit, 407: 20. 

12. f. Bazuzu , Mukiti-zer, Nabu-zer-lisir, 
dam a s .... 

13. 22:3; 387 :10, 11; 407:7. 

Nad-na-a, 

1. s. Nis-su-ilu, 114:3. 

2. f. Bdnia , Bel-iqbi, lnnin-zcr-iqisa, 


Marduk, NcCid-lstar, Nabu-iqbi, Nabii- 
sum-lisir, Nabu-sum-ukm. 

3. 226:7; 255:6. 
d Na-na-a-ah-iddin, 

1. s. Amel-Nana, 80:10. 

2. s. Ardi-Nabu, 408 :7. 

3. s. Arrab, 184:3; 238:10. 

4. s. Innin-sum-usur, 373:5. 

5. s. Nand-eres, 413:14. 

6. s. Nergal-uballit, 164:9. 

7. f. Ina-esi-etir, Nabu-ahe-bullut,&uziibu, 
Zeria. 

8. 25:7; 338:9; 373:2. 
d Na-n a-a- epus(-us), 

1. f. Ana-biti-su. 

2. 234:4. 
d Na-na-a-eres, 

1. s. Kidinu-Marduk, f. Nabu-zer-iddin, 
233:4. 

2. f. Ina-eB-etir,Innin-sum-usur,Kuddia, 
Nabu-baldtsu-iqbi, Nabu-Sum . . . ., 
Nadinu, Nana-ah-iddin, Rahas, Zeria. 

3. h nappall siqiarri, 358:2. 

4. h pusa, 212:2. 

5. 255:6; 392:16; 402:11. 

d Na-na-a-ibni, f. Bulluta, Marduk, Nergal- 
nasir, Upaqu. 
d Na-na-a-iddin, 

1. s. Balatsu, h pusd, 412:3. 

2. s. Mukin-zer, 108:15. 

3. s. h sangu Hi, f. Zeria, 307:5. 

4. f. Amel-Nana. 

5. h aslaku, 26:4. 

6. h arad ekalli, 409 :6. 

l. lx MU sa KIL issurati, 23:4; 200:8; 
234:6. 

8. 4:11; 53:9; 68:3; 241:8. 
d Na-na-a-kardbi, 

1. s. Ardia, 46 :3; h nappah[parzilli],±9:'3. 

2. s. Ina-silli-Nand, 258:2. 

3. s. Tab-sar . . .., 168:7. 

4. f. Ina-sillu-Nana, Innin-zer-uk/bH. 
Sdilu, Zeria. 

5. 80:19; 168:1; 396:7. 
d Na-na-a-sum-iddin, 19L:9. 




DOUGHERTY—ARCHIVES FROM ERECH 


51 


d Na-na-a .... usur, s. lna-silli-Nana , 419:2. 
d Na-na-a ...., 

1. s. Rimut , 74: G. 

2. s.. 108:13. 

3. f. Innin ...., Nergal-ndsir. 
d Na-na . . .., s. Nabu-sum-ibni, 196:4. 
Na-ni-ia , f. Ardia. 

h nds patri f. Nabu-sum-ukin. 
d Nergal-ah-iddin, f. Zeria. 
d Nergal-a-sa-rid, s. Nddin, gs. Andahir, 15:15. 
d Nergal-da-nu, 343: 7. 

d Nergal-epus(-us), s. Ekur-zakir, f. Musezib, 
257:8. 

d Nergal-esi-etir, 

1. s. h sangu AN-NA f. Oimillu, 398:4. 

2. s. 8amu, gs., 63: 23. 

3. s. Zabidci, 63:11. 
d Nergal-etir , f. Marduk-etir. 
d Nergal-ina-esi-etir, 65:3. 

d Nergal-ibni, 

1. s. zer, 392:11. 

2. f. Dikand. 

d Nergal-iddin, f. Oimillu , Rimdt, Sadunu. 
d Nergal-na-sir, ndsir , 

1. s. Aqar-aplu, 20:4; gs. Bel-apal-usur, 
6:10. 

2. s. Oimillu , 357:4. 

3. s . Nana-ibni, 84:2; 165:7; 191:3; 
389:3. 

4. s. ibni, 418 :4. 

5. s. a-pal, f. Nabu-etir, 380: 2. 

6. s.40:4. 

7. f. Ardia , Marduk-sum-iddin. 

8. 81:9; 389:7. 

,l Nergal-sum-ibni, f. Nabu-iqbi, Nddin. 
d Nergal-sum-iddin , 

1. s. Ina-esi‘etir,362:4’,375:3;gs.Humu, 
353:4. 

2. 387:9. 

d Nergal-uballit(-it ), 

1. f. Dannu-alje-su-ibni, Ibni-Innina , 
Nana-alt-iddin. 

2. 13:4. 

d Nergal-usallim, i. Kal (?)... Ibni-Innina, 
Innin-Sar-usur , Sum-iddin. 


d Nergal-u-Se-zib, 

1. f. Bania. 

2. 230 : 6. 

d Nergal-zer-ibni, s. Kudurru, 63 : 26. 
Ni-din-ti, turn, 

1. s. r Hili, gs.fZa ...., h pusd , 412:5. 

2. s. Nabu-musetiq-urra, 283:3; 366:6. 

3. h mdr Sipri sa Nabti-sar-usur, 345: 3. 
h NI- S URgi-ni-e, gi-na, gf. Baldtu, Nabu-bdni- 

ahi. 

d Nin-in-nu-sum-ibni,s.Nabu-bel-sunu,397 :10. 
Nis-su-ilu, “We called, 0 god!” f. Nadnd. 
Ni-qu-du, 169 : 7; 402 :10. 

Nur-e-a, 

1. s. IqiZa, 405:6. 

2. f. Nddina-aplu. 

3. 387:9; 402:5; 405:10, 20. 

Nur- d Sin , gf. Bel-iqisa, Samas-mukin-[zer]. 
Nur- d 8amaZs, 381:7. 

bpahharu , gf. tiamas-bdni-ahi. 

Pa-H-ia, s. Mannanu , 311:8. 

Pir\ 

1. s. Tabnea, gs. h bdHru , 63 :25. 

2. f. Nabu-Sum-iddin. 

Rab .... m-e, 228: 2. 

m ba-ni-e , f. Dajdn-Marduk, gf. Tabnea. 
Ra-has , s. Nana-ere$, 177:9. 

Ra-hi-im, 29:3,4. 

Ra-si-ilu, f. iTind. 

h re'u , f. Zer-Babili kl , gf. Samas-mudammiq, 
Tarib. 

r, re'u alpi, gf. Baldtu , Samas-mudammiq. 
h re'u sattukki, gf. Nabu-usallim. 

Ri-'ii-e-tu , 

1. s. Bel-enba, 250:4. 

2. s. Baldtu , 167 :3, 5. 

3. f. ^4rdi-Va&f(, Oimillu , Nabu-ahe- 
usallim. 

4. 250:4. 

Ri-mu-tu , Ri-mut , 

1. s. Eanna-ibni, 80 :4. 

2. s. Nabu-iddin, 15:4. 

3. s. Nabu- sum-ukin, 154:3. 

4. s. Nergal-iddin , 51:2; 241:4. 

5. s. Sin-abe-iddin, 229 : 3. 








52 


GOUCHER COLLEGE CUNEIFORM INSCRIPTIONS, VOL. I 


6. f. Ahu-sunu, Dannu-ahe-8u-etir, Ibni- 
Innina, Innin-zer-ibni, Innin-ahe ... 
Innin-zer-u8absi, Istar-sar-usur, Nd'id- 
I8tar, Nabu-musetiq-urra, Nana .... 

7. h MU 8a KIL alpi, 71:4; 249:15. 

8. h susanu, 134:2. 

9. Husanu 8a sisi, 122:4. 

10. 44:4;93:9; 110:2;204:5;258:6;351:4. 
Ri-mut- d E-a, d Ea, gf. Nabu-bani-ahi, &ama8- 

v 

ah-iddin, Samas-zer .... 

Ri-mut- d Gu-la, 198:10. 

Ri-mut . .. ., 44:4; 93 :10. 

Sa-ar-ma-, 351:3. 

Sa-ar-ri-im, 278:3. 

Si-lim- d Bel, 413:11. 
d Sin-ahe-iddin, f. Rimut.' 
d Sin-ahe-bul-[lut], s .Nabu-Sum-iddin, gs. Supe- 
Bel, 398:25. 
d Sin-ere8, 387 : 7, 8. 
d Sin-ibni, 

1. s. Baldtu, gs. Hunzu, 279:12. 

2. s. h re'u alpi, f. j Baldtu, 380:18. 

v 

3. s. Samas-mudammiq, 387 :14. 

4. 4:20; 193:5. 

A Sin-iddin, 

1. s. Bel-ahe-eriba, 352 : G. 

2. f. Amurru-zer-ibni. 

3.&& Eanna, 251:2. 

4. sa Eanna u h bel piqinitu sa 
Eanna, 66:4. 

d Sin-liq-unninni, gf. Bania, Bel-li’u, Innin- 
zer-usab8i, Nabu-bani-ahi, Nabu- 
usallim. 

d Sin-tab-ni, gf. Sama8-zer-lisir, Silld. 
d Sin-u8allim, 

1. s. Bel-ahe-eriba, 352: 6. 

2. h agarru , 268: 3. 

d Sin-zer-iddin, s. 117:12. 
d Su-pi-e- d Bel, gf Anum-muhin-aplu, Sin-ahe- 
bullut. 

v * 

Sa-am-ma-ha-aa-ni, f. [iL'Jwa. 

V w 

Sa-du-nu, 

1. s. h sangu AN-NA , f. Etilpi, 398: 26. 

2. s. Lultammir- Adad, f. Ridinu, 257:1. 
f. [ Kidinu]-Marduk, 257: 9. 


3. s. Nabu-8um-li8ir, 292 : 5. 

4. s. Nergal-iddin, 91:3. 

5. s. Sa-Nabti-su, 314: 4. 

6. h rab bit Jdlli, 120:2; 156: 5. 

7. 89:6; 230:11; 391:7. 

Sal-ti-ilu, f. Nabu-mukm-aplu. 

V V 

Sa-ma-ia, f. Nabu-musetiq-urra, Sama8-ah- 
iddin. 

V 

d Sama&-ah-iddin, 

1. s. Baldtsu, 94:14. 

2. s. Dannu-Nergal, 234: 7. 

3. s. Nabu-bani-ahi, gs. Rimut-Ea, 407:3, 
15, 17. 

4. s. fcamaia, 274:1. 

5. s. TUR-Esagila-nibi, gs. Misird, 260:1. 

6. f. Arrab. 

7. h bel pihati, 386:4. 

8. 260:12; 335:4; 343: 6; 379:2; 402:6. 

v 

d Sama8-ana-biti-8u, s. Amel-Nabu, 275:3. 

v 

d Sama8-apal-iddm, 4:10. 
d Sama8-bdni-ahi, s. Bel-iqisa, gs. h pahharu, 
407:2L 

v 

d Samas-eriba, 

1. h a8laku, 26 :4. 

2. 215:2. 

V 

d Samas-ibni, 

1. f. Marduk. 

2. 227:3. 
d Sama8-iddm, 

1. s. Bel-ibni, gs. Kuri, 403 :8. 

2. s., 167 : 9. 

3. f. Ardi-Bel. 

4. h pahharu, 287 : 5. 

5. 276:7. 

a Sama8-it-ti-[ia], h qallu, 385:3. 
d Samas-mudammiq(-iq), mudammiq(DAN), 

1. s. Iqisa, gs. h re’u alpi, 113:14; 162:3; 
231:13; 236:14; 237:11; 248: 10. 

2. s. Ina-e8i-etir, 396:16. 

3. f. Musezib-Bel, Sin-ibni. 

V 

d Samas-mukin-[zer], s. Bel-ahe-[iddin], gs. 
Nur-Sin, 390:7. 

d Samas-sar-usur, s. A8aggi, 202: 2. 

V 

d SamaS-sum-iddin, 

1. s. Bau-ah-iddin, 35:13. 






DOUGHERTY-ARCHIVES FROM ERECH 


53 


2. s. Kalla, 390 : 10. 

3. s. Nabu-balatsu-iqbi, 63:24; 205 : 1. 
d Samas-Sum-ukin, s. Apia , 241:15. 

d &amas-uballit{-it ), 

1. s. Amel-Nand, 192:9. 

2. s. Nddin, gs . h U. .. ., 407: 20. 

3. f. Bazuzu. 

4. 212:11. 

v 

d Samas-zer-ibni, 

1. s. Nabu-mukin . .. ., 308 : 10. 

2. f. Nabu-mudammiq, .... sum-eres. 

3. 4:9; 350:4. 

“ 8amaS-zer-iqisa(-sa ), 

1. f. Nabu-bdni-ahi. 

2. 83:4. 

d Samas-zer-liSir, 

1. s. 4#^, gs. Sin-tabni , 390: 2. 

2. s. Ardi-Innin, 299 : 4. 
d Samas-zer . ..., 

1. s. AluSezib-Bel, gs. Rimut-Ka, 307 : 1. 

2. s. Ta[n&], 31:5. 

v 

d Samas ...., 

1. s. Nddin, 407:7. 

2. f. BAN-KAK-Bel. 

3. 4:9. 

Sa-mu s .. f. Nergal-eSi-etir , 63:23. 

8a- d Innina-U-DA, 340:3. 

Sa- d Nabu-i-sal-lim, 338 :6. 

&A(?)- d Nabu-man-na-da, 337 :4. 

$a- d Nab ii-su- u, 

1. s. Bel-rbnanni, gs. h mandidi, 385:13. 

2. f. Bazuzu , Nabu-ahe-bidht , Sadiinu. 
&a- d Na-na-a-ta§-mit, 1 96:7; 166:6. 

Sanati-a, gf. Marduk-sarrani. 

&a-pi- d Bel, f. Bel-ah-usabsi, Ina-Esagila-zer. 
h sangu d Adad, gf. Musallim-Marduk. 
h sangu ili, gf. Zeria. 

Hangu d Zariqu, f. Nabu-Sum .... 

Hangu .. . gf. Bel-sum-iskun. 

Sa-rid, 

1. s. ApZa, 229 : 7. 

2. f. Bdnia, Innina • alik-pdni. 

3. 229:7. 

&e-el-li-bi, 387 : 18. 

i “The one whom Nana has marked.” 


&e-pit- d Nabu-as-bat, 41:3; 110:3. 

Si-ilu , s. Nand-kardbi, 15:2. 

Si-gu-u-a, Si-gu-u-a, gf. Gimillu, Dajdn-ahe- 
iddin, Mardulc- e riba,No b u- ctir-naqAd t i. 
3i-rik-ti, h kudimmu, 336 : 7. 

Si -, 108:8; 256:3. 

Su-la-a, 

1. s. Apia, h arad ekalli, 354:1. 

2. s. Ba-sum-iddin, 322:3. 

3. s. Nabu-ah-iddin, 260:16. 

4. s. Nabu-gdmil, 390:9. 

5. s. ea, f. Ki-sik-Nabu, 385 :14. 

6. f. Ardia, Ibni . . .., Ilsunu, Istar-zer- 
ibni, Nabu- mukin-aplu, Sin-zer-iddin. 

7. 308:7; 318:5; 

Sul-lum, f. Nabu-Sum ....,19:4. 

Su-ma-a, 

1. s. lbni-Innina, gs. h aslaku, 261 :17; 
412:17. 

2. s . Ibni-Istar, gs. h aSlaku, 189:12; 
250:10; 262:14; 353:15; 394:11; 
419:13. 

3. s. Zeria, 417 :14. 

4. f. Balatu. 

v 

Sum-a, s, Iddin-Papsukal, f. Balatu, 236:11. 
Sum-iddm, 

1. s. Nabu-nddin-alji, h pusd, 412:4. 

2. s. Nergal-usallim, 94:13. 

3. s. Iddin-Papsukal, f. Balatu, 236 :11. 

4. 387:8. 

v 

Sum-ulcin, 

1. s. Bel-zer, 269:4; 292:2; gs. Bsaia, 
167:1; 413:2. 

2. s. Nabu-ah-ereS, 113:6. 

3. f. Bel-uballit, MuSezib-Bel, Nddina- 
aplu. 

4. 25:8; 214:2; 327:6; 387:2. 

v 

Sum-usur, 

1. s. Innin-zer-ibni, 168: 3. 

2. s. Nabu-sar ...., 392 :15. 

3. s. Nabu-seme, 87 :8. 

4. 151:3; 246:8, 9. 

y 

Sum . . . ., s. Iddin-Marduk, 58: 2. 

Su-ii-ba-ni, s. Anu-eres, 320: 2. 











54 


GOUCHER COLLEGE CUNEIFORM INSCRIPTIONS, VOL. I 


V 

Su-id-lu . . . s. Nas{pnr]tum, 407 :16. 
Su-zu-bu, 

1. s. Bamtuhi, 63 :16, 21. 

2. s. Kudurru, 311:2. 

3. s. Nand-ah-iddin, 168:2. 

4. s. Zer-ukin, 63 :17, 20, 21. 

5. f. Baldtu. 

6. 111:3.' 

Sil-la-a, 

1. s. Nabu-nddin-aplu , gs. Sin-tabni, 
403:10. 

2. h re’u sa Gimil-[Nana], 1:2. 

Sil-me , 

1. s. Nddina-aplu , 225:9. 

2. 225:11. 

Ta-ad-dan-ahu, s. Nabu-babitsu-iqbi, 352:3. 
Tab-ni-e-a, 

1. s. h bddiru , f. Bdnia, 113:12; 117:3; 
f. Pir’, 63:25. 

2. s. Kabtia, gs. h rab bam, 217:3. 

3. f. Amel-Nand. 

Ta-lim, 

1. s. Sandtia, f. MarduTc-sarrani, 260:16. 

2. 295:6. 

Ta-qis- d Gu-la, d ME-ME, 

1. s. Ejibi, f. Musallim-Marduk, 65 :6. 

2. f. Amel-Nand,, Ibni .... 

3. 163:2. 

Ta-ra-bi , 108:12. 

Ta-ri-bi, Ta-rib, 

1. s . Bel-iqisa, 106:2; 117:4; 186:3; 
256: 8. 

2. s. Iqisa, gs. h re'u, 65:14. 

3. f. Bdnia , Samas-zer .... 

4. 108:12; 150:3. 

Tukulti- A Mardiik, KU, KU-ti, 

1. s. Kudurru, h re'u sattukki, 85:5. 

2. h re'u sattukki, 50:3; 144:3; 216:5. 
TUR- d Bel-da-nu, f. Innina-sum-usur. 
d TUR-Esagila-ni-bi, s. Misira, f. Samas-ah- 

iddin, 260:1. 

Tubi-ia, s. Kidin-Marduk, f. Eanna-lipi-usur, 
418:15. 

Tdb-sar-Eanna, 127 : 3; 209 :3; 212 :10. 
Tab-sar- d lnnina, 


1. h re’u issuri, 154:5. 

2. 241:13. 

Tab-sar- d Istar, 4:5; 13:3. 

Tab-sar .. . ., f. Nand-kardbi. 

1J-ba-ru, 350: 3. 

U-pa-qu , 

1. s. Nana-ibni, 241:11, 16, 19. 

2. f._, 58:11. 

3. Hiku, 249 :12. 

XJ-qu-pu, 338:8. 

h U gf. Samas-uballit. 
d Za-bd-bd-ereS, 124:4. 
d Za-bd . . . ., s. Bel-epus, 167 :10. 

Zab-di-ia , f. Nabu .... iddin. 

Za-bi-da-a, Za-bi-da, 

1. f. Nabu-ndsir, Neraal-esi-etir. 

2. 7: 5. 

Za-kir , f. Amel-Nand. 
fZa-ni-is, gm. Nidinti. 
f Za ... . ti, f. Nabu-nd'id. 

Za _, f._ ibni, 417:19. 

Zi-ri-ia, Zeri-ia, 

1. s. Ahe-sa, 228 :9. 

A 

2. s. Ibnd, gs. Egibi, h satammu Eanna, 
380:13. 

3. s. h [Bparu], 345 :2. 

4. s. Nabu-gamil, 264:3. 

5. s. Nabu-mudammiq, gs.,15:14. 

6. s. Nabu-ndsir, 178:4. 

7. s. Nana-ah-iddin, 268:10; 270:3; 
2S2: 7; 318:6; 377:4. 

8. s. Nana-iddin, gs. Hanguili, 307 :5. 

9. s. Nand-kardbi, 379:4. 

10. s. Nergal-ah-iddin, 240:3. 

11. s. ^igda,i. (?miWM,95:9;189:8;262:10. 

12. f. Innina-mukin-aplu, Kind, Muhin- 

v 

aplu, Nabu-muldn-aplu, Sim id. 

13. 32:5; 45:4; 265:3; 354:3. 
Zer-Bdbili ki , 

1. s. Ili l -Marduh,i.Bel-nddin-aplu, 231:12; 
233:15; 248:11. 

2. s. h r&u, 230:8. 

Zer-bdni-twn, f. Nabu-kUir. 

Zer-bi-bi, 

1. s. Nabu-etir-napsati, 418:5. 







DOUGHERTY—ARCHIVES FROM ERECH 


55 


2. 263:3; 300:3; 387:20; 401:5. 
Zer-ibni, 39:4. 

Zer-kit-ii-lmr , 372:2. 

Zer-uJdn, 

1. s. h massar abulli, f. Bel-nasir, 394:3. 

2. f. Suzubu. 

Zeru-u-tu, Zeru-tu, f. Innina-mukin-aplu, 
Nabu-alie-usallim. 

Zi-i-bi , f. Nabu-sum-iddin. 

. ... a, s. Apia, 18: 6. 

.. . . a-pal, gf. Nabu-etir. 

. . . . bdni-ahi, s. Imbia, gs. IIa nap, 307 :4. 

. . . . di-ia , 244:12. 

. . .. e-a, 

1 1. s. Balatu, 218:8. 

2. f. Apia, 66:14, 

3. gf. Tukulti-Nabu. 

. . . . Esagila-a-a, 417 :19. 

. . . . etir, s. Ahe ....,25:2. 

.. . . ia, 352:11. 

. . . . ibni, 

1. s . Za .. .., 417 :19. 

2. s.,58:1. 

3. f. .. . . kisir, Nabu-musetiq-urra. 

.. .. 

Names 

M A-ga-de ki , 417:5. 
wdt Ar-na-ba-nu, 225:4. 

“ l A . . . . ra, 108:16. 

Bdbilu ki , 1:10; 2:4; passim. 

Bar-sip*', 117:15; 296:4. 

Bit a-ld-tu, turn, ti, 286:5; 308:2; 377:3; 

393:2, 6; 396:11. 

Bit alpe me , 64:2. 

Bit m Balatu, 398: 7. 

Bit md Bel-iddin, 35:1. 

*Bit DA-KUB, 54:6. 

Bit dul-lu, 388:2, 9, 13. 

Bit m Gimillu, 398:4. 

Bit hi-il-su, si, 178:2; 190:3; 314:3; 320:5; 
339:4. 

Bit immeri, 64 :3. 

Bit h ispare, 228:4. 


1. s. Ardi-Bel, 116:2. 

2. s. Marduk-eriba, 17:2. 

3. s.. 88: 3. 

4. h qipu sa Banna, 94: 3. 

. . .. ki-sir, s. ibni, 176:4. 

.... kudurri-usur, 61:2. 

. . . . lu-la-a-a, 402:18. 

.... d Marduk, s. Marduk . . . ., gs. Babiitu, 
66:12. 

. . . . mu-a, s. Gimil-Nand, f. Innin-sar-usur, 
18:9. 

. . .. na-a-a, s. Dannu-Nergal, 216:3. 

. . . . d Nergal, 106:5. 

. . . . ri-ia, 399:6. 

.. . . ri-su-u-a, h rab bit ki-il, 318:2. 

.... si-ilu, 9:10. 

... . him-eres, s. Hamas-zer-ibni, 207 :2. 

. . .. sum-ibni , f. Ndbu-ahe-eriba. 

.... u-se-zib, f. Nabu-ahe-nsallim. 

. ... zer-iddin, f. Musezib-Bel. 

.. .. zer-usabsi(-si), 

1. s. Ina-esi-etir, gs.Bel-apal-usur, 418:12; 

2. 412:16. 

.... zer, f. Nergal-ibni. 


Places. 

Bit istanu, 398:5. 

Bit ka-ra-am, 241:1. 

Bit ka-ri-e, 241:1; 253 :8. 

Bitkare, 96:2; 254:5; 258:6; 388:3, 10,14. 
Bit kil-li, ki-il, 120 :3; 156 :6; 203: 3; 318 : 3. 
Bit m Rab-ba-ni-e, 228: 2. 

M Bit Mr Bdbili ki 353:16. 

Bit u-ri-e, 335 :1. 
dl Bitati, 225:3. 

ai 415 : 11. 

Dilmun(NI-TJJK ki ), 42:2; 238:2; 347:1; 
373:1. 

Duru ki , 314:6. 
tdmirtu Bu-us-si- e -tu, 16:1. 
mAt I-sal-la, 225:2. 

Al KAR Banna, 231:16; 248:13. 

KIP sa Bdbiii ki , 60:5. 














56 


GOUCHER COLLEGE CUNEIFORM INSCRIPTIONS, YOL. I 


Al KTJR-BAT, 413:2. 
m& * Mi-sir, 327 :3. 

Ni-ri-bi sa duri, 260 :18. 
Umirtu R a q-q a t- d $ a m a s, 103:3. 
Sip-par , 350:2. 

Si-i-hu sa d Belit sa Uruk ki , 248:13. 
m,H Si-im-mir, 9:2. 


&l Sur-ru , 94:17. 
mAi Sur-ru, 151:6; 169 :3. 
Ta-bi-nu, 403:6. 
natTe-ma-a, 294:6. 
dl U-pi-ia, 58:15; 256 :6. 
Uruk ki , 15:20; 17:12; passim. 


Names of 

E-an-na , 15:6, 13; 65:8; passim. 

E-bar-ra, 386:10. 

Ekurdti mes , 86:2. 


Temples. 

E- d Nusku, 89:5. 

E- d Usur-amdt-su, 173:4. 
E- d Sin, 418:18. 


Names of Canals and Gates. 


ndr A§, 107:3. 
ndr Har-ri, 96:11. 
ndr NI-KUR, 10:3. 
ndr 8arru, 376:2. 

ndr 8a ina abulli d Adad, 268:2, 9; 317: 1, 2. 


ndr Tak-kil, 54:3. 

Abullu, 394:4. 

Abullu d Adad, 268:2, 9; 317:2. 
Bab a-ki-ti, 393:2, 6. 

Bab ka-lak-ka, 279:7. 





Year. 

1 

1 

1 

2 

2 

2 

3 

37 

3 

3 

5 

9 

22 

12 

5 

18 

6 

7 

5 

4 

22 

14 

22 

5 

11 

8 

16 

14 

23 

22 

22 


CATALOGUE. 


Time of Nebuchadrezzar. 


Month. 

Day. 

GCBC 

Contents. 

3 

11 

225 

Receipt for animals. 

4 

16 

300 

Itemized inventory of animals. 

7 

? 

57 

Receipt for animals or hides. 

3 

7 

748 

Itemized receipt for wool. 

8 

29 

417 

Report concerning animals. 

9 

24 

472 

Itemized statement concerning money. 

1 

8 

412 

Record concerning cattle. 

1 

28 

128 

Date wine received for workmen who burn bricks. 

12a 

7 

110 

Iron placed at the disposal of blacksmiths. 

10 

7 

111 

Receipt for iron and iron wagons used in digging 
a canal. 

4 

10 

112 

Receipt for the bodies of dead animals. 

5 

14 

92 

Delivery of barley for flour. 

11 

1 

65 

Receipt for wool. 

7 

22 

83 

Record concerning barley. 

5 

12 

133 

Three men become surety for another. 

1 

16 

102 

Receipt for dates. 

9 

16 

285 

Record of interest to be paid. 

2 

6 

107 

Record of interest to be paid. 

2 

23 

431 

Impost on barley. 

3 

19 

136 

Receipt for wool. 

11 

15 

78 

Record of a transaction concerning sesame. 

8 

13 

95 

Payment of money and barley to two men in the 
service of the king. 

6 

22 

93 

Receipt for the bodies of dead fowls. 

1 

15 

320 

Receipt for sheep and goat hides. 

8 

15 

79 

Record concerning dates. 

4 

14 

80 

Delivery of garments to fullers. 

8 

8 

88 

Receipt for barley. 

6 

3 

295 

Report of revenue in currency and grain. 

2 

13 

89 

Receipt for the body of a dead sheep. 

12a 

26 

75 

Receipt for money. 

3 

23 

68 

Receipt for barley given to a sailor. 

(57) 



GOUCHER COLLEGE CUNEIFORM INSCRIPTIONS, YOL. I 


58 


Text No. 

Year. 

Month. 

Day. 

GCBC. 

32 

5 

4 

16 

64 

33 

22 

9 

10 

90 

34 

22 

8 

2 

299 

35 

22 

11 

28 

415 

36 

26 

12a 

9 

401 

37 

4 

3 

28 

458 

38 

38 

1 

5 

99 

39 

12 

p 

23 

298 

40 

21 

9 

28 

96 

41 

18 

7 

2 

48 

42 

21 

12 a 

26 

272 

43 

7 

10 

11 

105 

44 

23 

7 

p 

86 

45 

23 

12b 

3 

325 

46 

21 

7 

16 

315 

47 

32 

7 

21 

312 

48 

22 

9 

1 

67 

49 

21 

7 

24 

309 

50 

? 

7 

9 

335 

51 

36 

11 

21 

91 

52 

37 

6 

7 

53 

53 

24 

3 

24 

82 

54 

24 

10 

17 

146 

55 

26 

9 

23 

413 

56 

22 

11 

28 

74 

57 

36 

10 

14 

463 

58 

? 

? 

p 

477 

59 

22 

11 

27 

117 

60 

20 

5 

15 

331 

61 

13 

9 

12 

291 

62 

26 

? 

19 

310 

63 

? 

4 

16 

424 

64 

37 

2 

20 

85 

65 

36 

8 

6 

439 

66 

36 

11 

5 

440 

67 

32 

12a 

16 

61 

68 

36 

12b 

19 

118 

69 

22 

10 

11 

123 

70 

22 

11 

? 

60 


Contents. 

Receipt for barley. 

Receipt for dates as part of impost. 

Delivery of money as impost. 

Lease of property from a woman for four years. 
Payment of barley to workmen who perform 
special tasks. 

Silver paid for gold. 

Dates and wool paid to the chief consecrated 
servant. 

Itemized receipt for dates. 

Receipt for honey. 

Receipt for dates presented as an offering. 
Receipt for money, the price of dates. 

Temple record. 

Record concerning oil for lighting purposes. 
Receipt for money in payment for wood and salt. 
Receipt for iron and hoes. 

Iron delivered to a blacksmith. 

Receipt for oil used for lighting on feast days. 
Delivery of iron to a blacksmith. 

Receipt for the body of a dead animal. 

Record concerning an implement of iron. 

Date wine received for priests. 

Barley received for the use of cattle, and fowls. 
Money paid to men detailed for a specific Avork. 
Receipt for money paid for food to different 
persons. 

Revenue money paid for reeds. 

Document promising to pay the price of a dead ox. 
Record of interest to be paid. 

Record of barley paid to various artisans. 
Record concerning animals. 

Receipt for clothing. 

Receipt for barley used as food. 

Transaction concerning sheep and goats. 
Receipt for date wine given to ox and sheep 
stables. 

Record of debt to be paid. 

Bailment with provision for a fine in case of 
default. 

Receipt for salt used in temple sacrifice. 
Receipt for flour. 

Money given for a wooden instrument. 

Temple receipt. 




:t No. 

71 

72 

73 

74 

75 

76 

77 

78 

79 

80 

81 

82 

83 

84 

85 

86 

87 

88 

89 

90 

91 

92 

93 

94 

95 

96 

97 

98 

99 

100 

101 

102 

103 

104 

105 

106 

107 

108 

109 

no 


DOUGHERTY—ARCHIVES PROM ERECH 


59 


fear. 

Month, 

Day. 

GCBC. 

Contents. 

36 

12a 

25 

87 

Record concerning iron sickles used in har¬ 
vesting grass. 

V 

12 a 

26 

119 

Flour given to consecrated servants and the 
porter of the king. 

39 

3 

22 

103 

Oil delivered for a ship carrying temple vestments. 

27 

o 

tu 

1 

81 

Barley paid for dates and remuneration of work¬ 
men sent for grass. 

42 

8 

11 

70 

Record concerning iron and hoes. 

? 

? 

p 

321 

Receipt for date wine. 

37 

2 

21 

104 

Date wine received for various artisans. 

18 

7 

23 

73 

Money disbursed for the provender of fowls, etc 

23 

4 

10 

286 

Record concerning barley and flour. 

30 

11 

10 

430 

List of workmen. 

26 

3 

21 

273 

Report concerning dates and barley. 

30 

12b 

27 

77 

Date wine paid to fullers of temple vestments 

23 

11 

3 

100 

Statement concerning honey used on certain 
feast days. 

37 

2 

— 

94 

List of animals delivered to an individual. 

23 

8 

22 

115 

Barley from monthly revenue disbursed for food. 

41 

7 

29 

307 

Barley reported as tax. 

27 

4 

19 

54 

Receipt for barley used as food. 

22 

10 

13 

841 

Temple receipt. 

36 

9 

29 

46 

Flour received for use in the temple. 

38 

4 

18 

63 

Receipt for date wine. 

? 

11 

? 

55 

Receipt for flour. 

20 

? 

22 

297 

Money received for various purposes. 

? 

2 

9 

116 

Barley received for the food of shearers, etc. 

41 

5 

8 

454 

Record of debt to be paid. 

? 

? 

24 

447 

Record of debt to be paid. 

24 

2 

16 

101 

Itemized record concerning barley. 

42 

9 

23 

126 

Body of a dead animal received. 

36 

12b 

13 

69 

Receipt for flour. 

38 

3 

16? 

306 

Temple record. 

37 

7 

12 

59 

Wine delivered to stable workmen. 

40 

8 

8 

50 

Receipt for date wine. 

38 

2 

6 

296 

Receipt for date wine. 

38 

9 

11 

66 

Receipt for date wine. 

38 

3 

15 

58 

Receipt for date wine. 

40 

11 

30 

275 

Flour received for various artisans. 

40 

11 

15 

276 

Receipt for barley. 

43 

3 

11 

316 

Receipt for date wine. 

32 

4 

3 

484 

An order in the presence of witnesses. 

32 

3 

26 

416 

Barley given as food for brickmakers, etc. 

29 

12a 

18 

76 

Flour delivered to messengers sent toBabylon, etc. 


60 GOUCHER COLLEGE CUNEIFORM INSCRIPTIONS, VOL. I 


Text No. 

Year. 

Month. 

Day. 

GOBC. 

Ill 

22 

12 a 

11 

62 

112 

37 

6 

26 

51 

113 

35 

5 

5 

408 

114 

36 

4 

9 

324 

115 

38 

8 

27 

301 

116 

38 

9 

6 

125 

117 

33 

12b 

12 

426 

118 

39 

5 

24 

72 

119 

36 

12a 

9 

47 

120 

37 

1 

8 

313 

121 

2 

7 

21 

319 

122 

41 

11 

16 

305 

123 

23 (?) 

9 

1 3 (?) 

302 

124 

36 

1 

17 (?) 

294 

125 

33 

12b 

4 

56 

126 

41 

6a 

6 

303 

127 

41 

11 

2 

49 

128 

34 

7 

29 

277 

129 

37 

8 

29 

52 

130 

42 

8 

17 

71 

131 

41 

2 

13 

322 

132 

39 

8 

2 

284 

133 

27 

7 

19 

155 

134 

40 

6 

24 

288 

135 

42 

6 

16 

278 

136 

38 

4 

22 

308 

137 

40 

7 

7 

318 

138 

42 

12b 

29 

122 

139 

38 

2 

21 

274 

140 

21 

3 

28 

139 

141 

38 

4 

11 

120 

142 

40 

8 

1 

140 

143 

37 

3 

19 

323 

144 

36 

5 

20 

317 

145 

39 

11 

9 

314 

146 

? 

5(?) 

22 

282 


Contents. 

Dates substituted for flour in payment of 

messenger. 

Body of a dead fowl placed at the disposal of an 
individual. 

Promise to pay a debt. 

Document concerning the price of a garment. 
Receipt for date wine. 

Date wine received for various artisaus. 

Record concerning the calculation of impost on 
barley. 

Receipt for date wine. 

Receipt for date wine. 

Flour received by the prison master. 

Receipt for diseased and dead animals. 

Record concerning an animal hide. 

Receipt for barley. 

Receipt for the body of a dead animal. 

Payment of wool, containing a reference to the 
seal of a consecrated servant. 

Receipt for tithe. 

Receipt for honey used on feast days. 

Hides received for royal use. 

Date wine received for a coppersmith. 
Document dealing with iron and baskets. 
Receipt for barley paid as hire for laborers, who 
carry gypsum. 

Receipt for iron and other articles. 

Barley received as the food of two men for a 
month. 

Receipt for dates. 

Gold received by goldsmiths for the making of 
articles of adornment. 

Receipt for date wine. 

Flour received for branders. 

Date wine received for shoemakers. 

Date wine received for shearers. 

Record concerning sacrificial animals. 

Oil received for sacred use and for the making 
of bricks. 

Receipt for date wine delivered to stable workmen. 
Date wine received for priests. 

Receipt for the bodies of dead animals. 

Receipt for an article given to a fuller. 

Receipt for the body of a dead animal. 


xt No, 

147 

148 

149 

150 

151 

152 

153 

154 

155 

156 

157 

158 

159 

160 

161 

162 

163 

164 

165 

166 

167 

168 

169 

170 

171 

172 

173 

174 

175 

176 

177 

178 

179 

180 

181 

182 

183 

184 

185 


DOUGHERTY—ARCHIVES FROM ERECH 


61 


Year. 

Month. 

Day. 

GCBC. 

Contents. 

40 

9 

17 

124 

Receipt for flour. 

37 

3 

8 

281 

Receipt for date wine. 

40 

4 

27 

121 

Receipt for an animal. 

42 

9 

11 

200 

Flour received for a messenger. 

? 

? 

2 (?) 

98 

Flour received for the men who delivered food 
to the king and his soldiers. 

p 

3 

23 

114 

Receipt for barley and money. 

41 

7 

20 

145 

Receipt for barley, the massartu of brewers. 

39 

2 

17 

113 

Two coats of mail and sesame given to two men. 

42 

12b 

11 

97 

Receipt for money paid for various purposes. 

37 

5 

30 

106 

Flour paid to a messenger. 

40 

1 

2 

283 

Receipt for the bodies of burned animals. 

24 

2 

5 

151 

Statement of money paid for wool. 

43 

2 

15 (?) 

279 

Barley received for flour. 

39 

4 

13 

212 

Receipt for barley. 

36 (?) 

10 

9 

290 

Garment delivered to a consecrated servant. 

36 

6 

2 

108 

Receipt for honey used on feast days. 

19 

5 

13 

289 

Receipt for money in payment for food. 

43 

6 

15 

333 

Record concerning an animal. 

24 

6 

5 

224 

Record concerning barley received for food. 

. 12 

9 

2 (?) 

152 

Record concerning barley and cattle. 

34 

9 

4 

135 

Record of a debt to be paid, with accompanying 
oath. 

32 

9 

17 

149 

List of five soldiers. 

42 

6 

24 

144 

Receipt for dates. 

23 

6 

16 

154 

Record concerning honey, etc. 

37 

8 

29 

304 

Date wine received for goldsmiths. 

? 

? 

8 

280 

Itemized statement of money paid for various 
purposes. 

34 

2 

29 

287 

Record of salt used in the temple. 

10 (?) 

4 

3 

109 

Record concerning hides. 

42 

5 

19 

227 

Money paid for precious stones and clothing. 

42 

6 

16 

330 

Flour received for a messenger. 

38 

8 

3 

210 

Record concerning animals. 

22 

11 

14 

131 

Disbursement of revenue money. 

31 

10 

23 

446 

Barley paid to a laborer, who brought a basket 
to a priest. 

25 

6 

5 

205 

Receipt for barley. 

24 

10 

16 

201 

Itemized statement of money paid to laborers. 

39 

11 

20 

132 

Date wine received for stable workmen. 

39 

2 

8 

129 

Receipt for date wine given to a shearer. 

22 

7 

10 

141 

Money received for men who performed work for 
the king. 

27 

1 

19 

209 

Receipt for goat’s hair. 


GOUCHER COLLEGE CUNEIFORM INSCRIPTIONS, VOL. I 


62 


Text No. 

Year. 

Month. 

Day. 

GCBC. 

186 

33 

3 

4 

202 

187 

36 

1 

9 

465 

188 

22 

10 

3 

449 

189 

42 

1 

29 

443 

190 

10 (?) 

9 

20 

464 

191 

V 

6 

23 

451 

192 

35 

4 

24 

445 

193 

34 

6 

30 

137 

194 

8 

9 

11 

148 

195 

41 

2 

7 

143 

196 

42 

12a 

5 

470 

197 

? 

9 

9 

418 

198 

39 

11 

12 

425 

199 

10 (?) 

9 

7 

435 

200 

28 

8 

7 

453 

201 

32 

3 

2 

429 

202 

37 

12a 

12 

422 

203 

41 

1 

7 

469 

204 

29 

4 

20 

127 

205 

22 

7 

5 

211 

206 

39 

1 

25 

427 

207 

38 

11 

3 

448 

208 

— 

7 

13 

409 

209 

40 

9 

2 

420 

210 

18 

8 

26 

434 

211 

35 

2 

22 

402 

212 

12 (?) 

6 

14 

153 

213 

42 

4 

11 

460 

214 

39 

9 

2 

455 

215 

30 

6 

10 

442 

216 

26 

12a 

26 

473 

217 

31 

12a 

6 

478 

218 

43 

1 

2 

459 

219 

42 

12b 

22 

450 

220 

38 

3 

6 

206 

221 

40 

5 

12 

150 

222 

30 

3 

28 

476 

223 

41 

5 

28 (?) 

467 

224 

38 

11 

22 

441 

225 

42 

12b 

2 

147 

226 

8 

11 

26 

292 

227 

41 

6b 

13 

466 


Contents, 

Receipt for sesame. 

Document concerning iron and baskets of iron. 
Receipt for wool, etc. 

Promissory note. 

Receipt for barley and date wine. 

Money paid for the food of ten workmen, etc. 
Record concerning animals, garments and wool. 
Statement of honey used on feast days. 

Articles of iron delivered to a blacksmith for 
marking. 

Inventory of animals. 

Sheep placed at the disposal of an individual. 
Inventory of animals. 

Itemized receipt for various articles. 

Statement of honey etc., used on various feast days. 
Statement of grain brought as food for fowls. 
Document concerning barley. 

Receipt for jugs of wine. 

Receipt for flour. 

Money paid for the rent of a ship, etc. 

Record of the delivery of three tablets. 

Record of dates given as food to persons who 
took baskets to Babylon. 

Itemized account of dates paid for workmen. 
Money paid for flour, oil, salt, etc. 

Statement of honey used on feast days. 

Receipt for dates and barley. 

Money received for precious stones. 

Itemized receipt for oil. 

Statement of oil delivered for wool. 

Money paid for wool. 

Temple record concerning hides. 

Receipt for animals. 

Receipt for various articles. 

Receipt for dates. 

Temple document. 

Receipt for a jug of the best quality of date wine. 
Money deposited for wool. 

Inventory of animals. 

Receipt for iron. 

Itemized receipt for date wine. 

Receipt for sixteen jugs, etc. 

Record concerning food given to workmen. 
Hides placed at the disposal of shoemakers. 



228 

229 

230 

231 

232 

233 

234 

235 

236 

237 

238 

239 

240 

241 

242 

243 

244 

245 

246 

247 

248 

249 

250 

251 

252 

253 

254 

255 

256 

257 

258 

259 

260 


DOUGHERTY—ARCHIVES FROM ERECH 


63 


Year. 

Month. 

Day. 

GCBC. 

Contents. 

P 

8 

25 

421 

Money paid for various articles. 

18 

9 

25 

444 

Statement of the destruction of a tablet record¬ 
ing an obligation. 

36 

11 

10 

483 

Itemized temple record. 

41 

6b 

27 

433 

Record of debt to be paid. 

3 

9 

4 

438 

Receipt for sheep hides. 

38 

4 

26 

471 

Record of debt to be paid with provision for fine 
in case of default. 

32 

9 

14 

428 

Itemized receipt for barley. 

38 

4 

5 

461 

Itemized statement of wine given to workmen. 

35 

7 

6 

480 

Record of debt to be paid with provision for a 
fine in case of default. 

35 

7 

24 

475 

A note promising to give 6000 reeds in payment 
for wool. 

26 

3 

7 

468 

Articles of food supplied to the king. 

20 

10 

29 

479 

Itemized account concerning barley and dates. 

41 

6a 

23 

456 

Record of barley given to workmen and sailors. 

32 

11 

19 

744 

Itemized receipt for barley paid for various pur¬ 
poses. 

22 

6 

12 

226 

Record of the payment of money, etc. 

21 

11 

24 

293 

Receipt for flour. 

20 (?) 

9 

10 

134 

Itemized record concerning various articles. 

39 

12a 

26 

130 

Receipt for dates. 

23 

4 

4 

138 

Receipt for animals used in temple offerings. 

39 

2 

2 

411 

Receipt for salt, etc. 

41 

6b 

— 

485 

Record of tax to be paid. 

34 

9 

3 

423 

Salt, etc., disbursed for various purposes. 

30 (?) 

5 

7 

419 

Itemized statement of barley and money given 
to different individuals. 

39 

2 

2 

462 

Gold given to goldsmiths to make articles for a 
goddess. 

41 

3 

13 

437 

Inventory of animals. 

? 

2 

17 

432 

Record concerning barley. 

39 

2 

14 

332 

Itemized receipt. 

19 

7 

25 

142 

Receipt for barley. 

p 

1 

12 

334 

Money disbursed for various purposes. 

17 

2 

2 

207 

Record concerning the disposal of money. 

26 

4 

23 

203 

Itemized statement of barley used as food. 

37 

12a 

13 

329 

Promissory note. 

31 

9 

9 

414 

One man becomes surety for another. 

38 

3 

18 

452 

Promissory note with provision for fine in case 
of default. 

37 

? 

3 

436 

Promissory note with provision for fine in case 
of default. 


64 GOUCHER COLLEGE CUNEIFORM INSCRIPTIONS, VOL. I 

Time of Nabonidus. 


Text No. 

Year. 

Month. 

Day. 

GCBC. 

263 

9 

9 

1 

199 

264 

7 

12a 

10 

217 

265 

7 

6 

27 

195 

266 

? 

? 

p 

182 

267 

7 

5 

18 

187 

268 

7 

11 

22 

243 

269 

8 

6 

4 

264 

270 

11 

3 

18 

241 

271 

8 

12a 

26 

254 

272 

7 

12a 

28 

237 

273 

11 

5 

13 

262 

274 

11 

5 

18 

267 

275 

11 

3 

17 

260 

276 

16 

8 

17 

198 

277 

11 

3 

25 

183 

278 

8 

4 

16 

256 

279 

11 

2 

16 (?) 

266 

280 

10 

12a 

11 

247 

281 

11 

4 

19 

197 

282 

11 

5 

7 

251 

283 

8 

6 

26 

255 

284 

11 

3 

28 

178 

285 

7 

10 

14 

265 

286 

11 

11 

9 

220 

287 

4 

12a 

23 

180 

288 

11 

2 

27 

196 

289 

7 

' 9 

7 

233 

290 

7 

1 

2 

236 

291 

10 

6b 

27 

179 

292 

8 

10 

22 

229 

293 

7 

12a 

29 

186 

294 

5 

12 a 

5 

185 

295 

10 

9 

1 

223 

296 

? 

4 

4 

239 

297 

3 

1 

12 

166 

298 

7 

4 

12 

258 


Contents. 

Flour received for the making of money. 
Receipt for impost. 

Receipt for clothing. 

Statement concerning wool and barley. 

Money placed at the disposal of an individual. 
Money paid for digging a canal. 

Receipt for money paid for a horse. 

Money advanced to canal diggers. 

Receipt for money. 

Receipt for the money paid for sheep. 

Receipt for gate revenue. 

Money received for deposit in storehouse. 
Record concerning a deficiency in money. 
Promissory note with provision that no complaint 
shall be made. 

Money received in payment for an ox. • 
Money received in payment for linen. 

A note promising to pay a debt. 

Document concerning moneypaid to brickmakers. 
Record concerning articles of copper. 

Money paid to canal diggers. 

Receipt for money paid to hired workmen. 
Money paid to canal diggers. 

Record concerning the price of hides. 

Receipt for wool. 

Barley received by a potter for work on a gold 

vessel. 

Receipt for gate revenue. 

Receipt for honey used on feast days. 

Receipt for garments, a coat of mail and hides. 
Money paid for the burning of bricks. 

Record concerning the price of a house. 
Receipt for money paid for sesame for sacrificial 
purposes. 

Disbursement of money for donkey and flour. 
Money expended for canal laborers and reed 
cuttings. 

Money paid to persons sent to Borsippa. 
Receipt for date wine given to workmen for 
measuring barley. 

Money received as revenue from a ship carrying 
temple vestments. 



ct. No 

299 

300 

301 

302 

303 

304 

305 

306 

307 

308 

309 

310 

311 

312 

313 

314 

315 

316 

317 

318 

319 

320 

321 

322 

323 

324 

325 

326 

327 

328 

329 

330 

331 

332 

333 

334 

335 

336 

337 

338 

339 


DOUGHERTY—ARCHIVES FROM ERECH 


65 


Year. 

Month. 

Day. 

GCBC. 

Contents. 

11 

4 

30 

230 

Money paid for a coat of mail of dyed wool. 

9 

10 

? 

221 

Flour received for the sindu of doors. 

8 

5 

9 

190 

Inventory of animals. 

11 

4 

23 

213 

Sheep placed at the disposal of three individuals. 

8 

1 

17 

259 

Receipt for money. 

7 

1 

23 

268 

Statement concerning the price of wool, re¬ 
presenting a debt. 

10 

6b 

6 

234 

Temple receipt. 

8 

2 

16 

181 

Money paid for various purposes. 

12 

1 

11 

219 

An act prohibited with the penalty stated. 

8 

9 

20 

510 

Money paid for various purposes. 

10 

5 

18 

175 

Statement of gate revenue. 

7 

6 

12 

189 

Ten hides received for money, the price of two 
sheep. 

7 

4 

20 

177 

Itemized report of money expended. 

7 

3 

26 

828 

Money paid for the hire of workmen sent for poison. 

11 

4 

18 

235 

Temple receipt. 

4 

11 

26 

193 

Record concerning garments. 

10 

11 

7 

188 

Report of the revenue for a stated time. 

11 

4 

7 

214 

Record concerning articles of copper. 

7 

12a 

23 

253 

Statement of money paid for digging a canal. 

11(?) 

1 

15 

252 

Report of money paid for food. 

11 

1 

14 

231 

Payment of balance due on the price of a ship. 

10 

11 

7 

222 

Money received for an ox and herbs. 

2 

9 

15 

176 

Receipt for hides and an implement. 

5 

6 

29 

503 

Receipt for the tithe of Belshazzar. 

10 

10 

12 

494 

Money paid to canal diggers. 

7 

12a 

14 

512 

Statement of the price of gold. 

3 

10 

6 

228 

Barley received by a goldsmith. 

5 

12 a 

18 

491 

Record of ship rental. 

5 

6 

28 

240 

Money paid for precious stones, etc. 

? 

? 

22 

208 

Report of gate revenue. 

10 

8 

29 

261 

Money paid for sesame. 

9 

3 

17 

172 

Record of money paid for animals. 

3 

6 (?) 

22 

218 

Statement concerning money. 

7 

3 

24 

191 

Record of a monetary transaction. 

3 

3 

12 

167 

Record concerning various articles. 

10 

11 

20 

204 

Payment of money for making bricks. 

5 

8 

7 

216 

Record concerning an ox which died in the stable. 

3 

12a 

26 

232 

Silver brought for lead, etc. 

3 

3 

4 

215 

Receipt for salt used for sacrificial purposes. 

10 

6b 

29 

492 

Record concerning revenue and the payment of 
wages. 

7 

10 

1 

263 

Record concerning sesame, oil, wool, etc. 


66 GOUCHER COLLEGE CUNEIFORM INSCRIPTIONS, VOL. I 


Text No. 

Year. 

Month. 

Day. 

GCBC. 

340 

7 

6 

13 

169 

341 

8 

9 (?) 

28 

174 

342 

6 

8 

16 

184 

343 

? 

9(V) 

19 

194 

344 

9 

3 

25 

171 

345 

5 

y 

4 

242 

346 

5 

? 

7 

257 

347 

? 

9 

6 

192 

348 

5 

5 

6 

168 

349 

7 

6 

26 

271 

350 

11 

2 

23 

248 

351 

7 

4 

11 

522 

352 

10 

11 

2 

249 

353 

7 

11 

6 

244 

354 

10 

6b 

12 

499 

355 

9 

4 

27 

270 

356 

8 

11 

18 

519 

357 

8 

10 

22 

497 

358 

4 

10 

7 

488 

359 

5 

12a 

— 

505 

360 

7 

10 

4 

490 

361 

7 

12a 

8 

498 

362 

7 

5 

16 

245 

363 

5 

4 

29 

516 

364 

5 

4 

23 

250 

365 

7 

8 

22 

170 

366 

8 

5 

29 

515 

367 

6 

9 

23 

511 

368 

5 

5 

7 

513 

369 

11 

3 

5 

506 

370 

5 

5 

9 

502 

371 

10 

6a 

26 

504 

372 

11 

4 

29 

514 

373 

11 

4 

7 

520 

374 

7 

4 

21 

269 

375 

4 

11 

10 

747 

376 

11 

5 

11 

495 

377 

7 

9 

6 

521 

378 

11 

3 

29 

493 


Contents. 

Temple document. 

Report concerning the payment of money for 
reeds. 

Transaction concerning gold, silver and precious 
stones. 

Report concerning revenue. 

Document dealing with the stipend of workmen. 
Record concerning dates. 

Receipt for animals. 

Receipt for dates. 

Receipt for barley. 

Money brought for oil. 

Wages paid to ship laborers. 

Money paid for linen. 

Money paid for the making and burning of bricks. 
Note promising to pay a debt. 

Money expended for the food of a palace ser¬ 
vant, etc. 

Money paid for service to Belshazzar and for 
the making of bricks. 

Report of gate revenue. 

Silver paid for gold. 

Payment of wages to a coppersmith. 

Silver and gold received as revenue. 

Report of gate income. 

Individual consecrated as a servant of the 
goddess of Erecli. 

Receipt for massartu. 

Money paid for a three year old ox. 

Wages paid to straw carriers. 

Money paid to hired laborers. 

Itemized receipt for money. 

Report concerning money needed by the temple. 
Receipt for money. 

Money paid to canal diggers. 

Gold given for making a temple utensil. 

Money paid for various purposes. 

Record concerning garments. 

Document concerning dates. 

Report of revenue. 

Money paid for implements. 

Money paid to canal diggers. 

Payment of money to hired laborers. 

Record concerning sesame. 


DOUGHERTY—ARCHIVES FROM ERECH 


67 


Text No. 

Year. 

Month. 

Day. 

GCBC. 

379 

10 

1 

15 

763 

380 

12 

5 

20 

760 

381 

13 

10 

10(?) 

525 

382 

11 

4 

18 

496 

383 

8 

7 

22 

238 

384 

5 

11 

25 

489 

385 

3 

12a 

11 

759 

386 

5 

12a 

6 

487 

387 

11 

11 

15 

738 

388 

3 

5 

1 

517 

389 

4 

2 

24 

500 

390 

17 

7 

17 

528 

391 

7 

7 

9 

246 

392 

1 

4 (?) 

10 

523 

393 

5 

? 

21 

508 

394 

5 

11 

P 

527 

395 

7 

1 

2 

501 

396 

7 

6 

'25 

507 

397 

3 

1 

30 

518 

398 

1 

3 

17 

764 

399 

12 

1 

1 

526 

400 

13 

3 

14 

736 

401 

9 

10 

8 

173 

402 

5 (?) 

9 

12 

535 

403 

1 

12a 

30 

531 

404 

10 

11 

27 

743 

405 

5 

4 

19 

755 

406 

7 

6 

30 

749 

407 

15 

2 

5 

737 

408 

10 

4 

2 

756 

409 

5 

12a 

24 

754 

410 

2 

7 

26 

534 

411 

5 

2 

11 

530 

412 

2 

9 

21 

745 

413 

5 

12a 

7 

524 

414 

10 

6a 

12 

533 

415 

5 

12a 

10 

532 

416 

5 

8 

7 

536 

417 

Acc. 

8 

p 

529 

418 

12 (?) 

? 

14 

509 

419 

6 

10 

20 (?) 

739 

420 

2 

11 

2 

742 


Contents. 

Money paid for various purposes. 

Record concerning the decision of a witness. 
Document concerning barley. 

Record concerning a garment of wool. 

Report of revenue. 

Record of ship and gate receipts. 

Sale of a slave. 

Gold revenue placed at the disposal of goldsmiths. 
Itemized statement of barley given for matsartu. 
Fabrics given to weaver, etc. 

Receipt for money, the price of wool. 

Promissory note. 

Record concerning money. 

Itemized receipt for oil. 

Payment of money to hired laborers. 

Promise to pay a debt. 

Statement concerning the disbursement of money. 
Report of harvest money. 

Temple document recording an obligation. 
Document concerning a house or an estate. 
Receipt for money and sesame. 

Inventory of animals. 

Receipt for flour given to consecrated servants 
of the temple. 

Itemized receipt for money and wool. 

Record of a debt to be paid. 

Statement of ship and gate receipts. 

Temple record dealing with various transactions. 
Receipt for money. 

Document concerning money. 

Receipt for harvest money and the hire of 
laborers. 

Itemized receipt for money. 

Document concerning iron and iron wagons. 
Record of a discrepancy in an amount of money. 
Record concerning five fullers. 

Record of a debt to be paid. 

Receipt for the hire of laborers. 

Document concerning money and garments. 
Temple record concerning sheep and money. 
Document dealing with interest to be paid. 
Record of a debt to be paid. 

Record of a debt to be paid. 

Report of impost. 

































































































AUTOGRAPHED TEXTS 






PLATE I 


1 



T 

TT 




5 


mm 


Lo. E 

R. 


»<T 

T "ffl 'jgifc-P— > 


c j>^ 


^5— 


V/ //ffl$\ '&£a 


. i~<f-7 £J «Tf T^CtT^ fc* 


Ay*—«V~xJ 


CL 


IP 


t &n.0-I'\~^~&^ 





























■ 




































.. 










































• 






















■ 




































6 


PLATE II 


0 

ira^piT* 

t ^Mr^wp-Tf >4pn pr ■Tf 

* Tf ^^^A^TKYT W^ Y W 





*. ^m^TT^TTO-TT-^^^Tf 

« T^TTc- WTTf^WWrW 
Mm TFXTT ^^TTf TfTW^WT 
W A WITT @-MTfT»iTMK 

fpwp 

t'^M TOTT ^ ^TTF 
« TTYTte?^ 

TWlfKM WT^4lf 

^TT ^ 

W7 i?5r ^ 


wwmg'Y 




11 



^5— 


/?. 


'^5 Wfa 




£U 


WlSUr 


¥^4r 


C 


12 

o. ETWpl^T- 

TMa^4P(ter 

HR^’jSWW 
WrgfcGm 
I W|t£KT^ <#*•<• 


7 9 



o ^tT A Tf 
Tf ^SKIT 
YTfHT^I 
7jf & A ffa- 

A <A fcfcH 


o. fsf^v^xnpaww 
w^f^Tw^r 

i &v wmmm-rff 


o.TTTW 

¥*pr 



YWMWtJ X „ ^ 





14 

a WffW^- 
&&*>£■ 
•4-wF^WM 

TT >T 





































- 


















































f , 








' 













. 






PLATE III 


Lo E 


W' 


* t & mm 

>-irife , 


15 


ix 


to £ 


»• T*»®f^nXTTm^ 
T-^MOTT TOT W«SATfM 
-<T* 0 a.i^TTrfTW^^ 
MMWOT»^ 

5 h ^rM>T t&M Afefe#- 
-<T <YA PI3WS? 

abw 
* tma^ppasw 

^^hSIi=ws 


>^ws®«YWm 


;o 



17 


«OTfpr^YT^se^| 

TOTT^W WMf' ' 

TOTT>^JPTO& ^ 

^ 30 ^^ &&M 




Lo. E. 


W#A 


iff 

HI# 

i# 


*T»^fc 9 nrcm *<>48 

- 4 ^ 4 ^y^>y 


p 

III 



Ji 



rwwta #4 


/#/ 

M 


w 


18 


iu^r 

A^KATiAVTOT’SWWiP 
n Tt+f^rwY^nriWA 
^TTAm^t 

T IS'^WIW^IS 

a *-<A gnw w^yyxy 

T W^ 6 Y WFjY 


Lo. E. 


YjsanRsr 

TOTY 

yA 

" Tf 
'“TTY 




yy-sibs? 


20 


Z. £'. 


^Y^YYSBYfcY^ 









16 


@* ȣ$**% 

0 VEH 85 Y 

m &5 


tAA 



19 


0 . 




Y^Y^t- 



#tA- 




fm 
&= 


fcSSfc**Sf$[ 


Jl 


T^^YYWp^ 

As&YS^X. 


^ZWzX'-w^ 

u 








































































































; 









, . . v 










. 







































PLATE IV 


20 

to 

|% m arTWW 
M mfesr^- 




s m 


•■ W A- 


* tA - 4 . 4 ©! 2 |s 


24 


o. @-v 

TTT ~?> ^I>^ T>- 

TA^WT»X 4 M 
A— 

rn^vamm ■ uamn^mm* 


21 

m. "VUi 


tt w^mx^wm 

«■ 

>aatt ^ 

22 

o- mm tm-m-<w > 

AA^FTTAT 

TAwf>^^nnfTi^| 

PUP 

# 


at A 
>AAT^vWep ; ftfS[^ 


ffi 


fmAtMsr> 

* 

'•T^TW 
TttWAATWA 



{/. £■. 


i=A 


^ 7 k/ 

V/:/, 


10 


23 »,•' 

a ^ w ^ a - ! 
< 

A< 


D 


26 

* A’gA’fv— 
*. 

27 


T , SS£ 4 l tspfc? 

fcAAiS £3 jpx 


o. 


28 

jwjbi ^sr 

TutJe-mw 

TAT^PTfA 
Prtfcfcff mw 
xrnr^>AAf-<A 

&X 

m 




29 

YHFT 'ffHAW 
SKm^AAff 
s A-rfA 

>A«TTTA 

mEYlAfM 

30 

W^l^STf 
XprmEjg* *A 

SAtesr^ 


31 

“TSk &>=f- 



























































PLATE V 




33 



TfTfTTfTf 
"•TRCTTW 
■«Wfi 

■< 4 S?^r 




o. MTT m>YYXTTm£Y 

$ YYY ml -gr 4sr #- 

PTf YTf Y@Y 

A ^-v-jffYY 

Y^Y^M^Y^Ywft Y v-YM 

J-g'TT Ht l£-X 
»" A fcfTTY feST YXTT 
Tff& m TfXYT A W ’*--*■ 
T Wff Hr YXYT * ^ Tf 

Yl ^nTYfY^rwr^ffif^ 
g- y «>««*=•$* 

**W.y fa? 2 U t& A 3 SI ^ 


X 3 ff & 

tt^y vfr ^ yHp 
A 53 VY HESHT Tf 5BF t^- 

* YWYY4Y V?Y 3HY M 

TF 1 Tf W ft#-<P- 
^'*-WfrS^TTT^ t^T^MA 

* Ap~PY 0 <STt^K 

„ A-J&^-Sfc- spr^ntTOW 

>A YYY YY 

m& y m *=& a 


34 

\Si ,s- ■ s 


37 

”<wpw »TY-^KY» 
tf>^<w;ktw 7 £j* 

JSP £n? 














































PLATE VI 


O. 


38 

¥ gr^ATf 


42 




If 


iAk 




, A 


*/> 





39 


°- Wfl^g'YW^M 
Tmfi[AM& 

TW8We®ffTTMjM( 

^TTYTW^ v& ^ aV ifii 
iwr^msYA- 1 




wxw 

KW 

r^ 
r ^ 

40 

o-WTATf 
YifXf ATA 
Y^*AXY 
YHf^ars^ 

5 mm^ 
«w' 



-Ki) 




44 

* rm YPnrwj 

&fcTY*J ' ‘ 
Wl^: 
TYY.^^ 

'Y^r. 

i». r. g 

A «m^| 

‘fia&TfcsH 


10 


45 


41 


W^^YEWfcff 
¥YY 

mu 


o‘J/P *■ 


wy^asaa^i 


410 Y^PM 
HATH A<S~ ATT 
WJTAA^ 
<TtA£ 8 Yg^ - 

OTr^AAXnT^ 


JP" 


nil 


46 


“•YY04 ^-yma 

YSh^S Tf ser 

TAMir^P 

•RT^riY^j^' 

^AcwmsfcWL* 



47 


TYA^W'M 
TWW^ AggTYY 
*■ A«< 1 TAS 

‘WroiiWtt 


(A 


48 


jJRTf 

W'um-m 

TtiiTtfcTHMiA 

T^WATTX 

ATWSAfcfftJ 

J 4 M 0 n^'«W% 38 ^ 

AAA^T© 



49 


wmmM 

-T-AAAY^ 
f TATTY A 


m * 


1 

«fe 


t 


ya 


50 


nifUiC' “WAT 

pAAp-_ x. 































































































































































































































PLATE VII 





Up 




T’PTHK^fcgP 





TfT HT--CT 

|fw« 

ia-fc 


14 '/ 4 £+'* 

%lf# 





52 

fci- 

Tfv^r^. tjir> 

T^tarprm^m 

A ^ 

>^ a< tfei- ^ 

^ 4 A 2 f ^r 

53 

o^pfi^Tf^ 

’TY^iSr^KW 

5 |/^r «t vsr>^rTf 
$j^WJ 8 *P-£J 

, 8 k<rt^ 

ffmATTY^AY^ 



{/. £\ 


imti' 





54 


<T mz&fr 1 “ 


>tdlp' 

-45 


,§i»: ; 

+P 


& 




55 


° fgSSg^A^ 
t ipmYW-^Tw^ 

WWTfv^rts^ffrTfKK 

T^w^^TTTfffl^T 

«• Kf t£ ^r« W > 4 M<w ^ 

»mi^& 3 r£**^A 4 ©fctr 


56 


«-grr 

T^SSftA^TfTMWH 

t 


















































































































































































PLATE VIII 


5 -a ‘-ass %ss m £ ^ kk 

m a- ew 

*• a«W 

«yi 3 S r **t*w**©fc[ 


57 

■ jp 5 pr 

T' Tf m WT 

j iff BRA £3 'AK-ty+ffc^r AA 


^ SfJTr-gX a A 


/o 


7 T A M w=f A 
fefe a- 

1 H 3 KTA AXAWA 

Byfcar#*i£Aa$ 3 ® 




»T»s^ffy^fTf* 3 ?r 
3 <T6f Ay^VTAmtf 
ft MAH l&lFW?' 
IgMTfAj&^AAA-- 
5 w gf wwii'^H 
>-^fj^. yf 7 *~ 

^ *£ih'ft *m. 


60 

0 TEET ft 
TT 5M ^ 

ja AmAr^y i&mm> 

s y jb^ j^YA^^i^iP 

*■ ^ A£TAy?A A AA 

Assy tear^i iAftyg* 


61 


5 

/?. 



62 


oT^f^^T Aft 
Af atp m'f 


rsk 5 $$:m$m- *t 


written upon 
erasure 


>aaays 5 ^i *-^TS to 






























' 









< 





. 














PLATE IX 


63 

wr^TfTi w^ 

T<T wiaw THtf .. 

$m mtw®& 

%kgm ^•a , x*«^^a r 4#fe^* te ® 



' "m 



i fc| 


Lo.E. 


AYXYTTf^ 


! # tSrWTTXTTS*^1g^ 

gSWK^«3$B$ X*®P 
« fefe=-3& -0X 85? A >A TTf-A AW W* 
Y W4^r t^TKYTBYFfT g && 

TfXll^X'l^XM M 

tot^ aat ir^^MmY 1 

r i w ^-g^-rr mtA^r^i 

"T£TYTf<T g H 4-TTXYT^tff-CK SfeA * 
WTTTHYTfYT^ Sr ^-TFXYT^teSTT £g 
Xf PfTA^XYW M ATOT WS- Yfe 
A^^7A^A^>Y7YC?TY ^TPJ#m 
T A if SJ Tf#J 

"T ^^-YXYT^S^TfTf T>^ gW 


Z,. jF 


I« fcsr wXYCmX^^ 

'"' ~ximsAAf?AM^gf 


X/m. 


V'""\ 

m? 


X".'ff//X. 


V 


%///,% 


•» 


64 

» mayayaaiY iP ’ 

YTf ast^ ^ ^4 

Amy ay a* 

Tg - AAA^X# 






















PLATE X 


65 


67 


o ^ fefet hitts iiA 
YT 

* ^m<T ^ h} ^ vtxY 

vf Tsntt 

*-£&£*»* >-taref^^ 

Y ^ s^t fcsSi^r >- sr «y- ^ 

Yi|^s A, 

i° 0 ^ m'rrrr 

TTfTf TTT KK 

Tm^TfXTT»‘®MMm 
T 'ftXYT^^TfTMff^ 
T ^ TfTYm YTf Tf ^ 

M L* 

«*■ xasEtTtxr 





10 
Lo. E. 


66 

TOT^ma^-^gf 

.<A3X&r&&% 

^ L YSf^ ■‘X-2^ ‘A l ,„,^ 4 ,, / ..„ . 

TTt & 3T7 ; ^«=F 
TT wSrA^Tfct ^r< 

K-Wk *A *XT(^^5@X -<X 

TfTfT >®X^n TfT *fftXJf 


£/. £\ 


a-^cer^^fr^Tf 

T*^ i )3fr>4T '$&mm, 
iAAf W)4 
T^r^f v4r^ a 

>^6 <«7T ^ 

h mmt£m$A&s& 


•TT *- W 07 

THSffl 0A ^ 

<W i4f)4rTf A 

) -£3A~ !S $L , . ,’ [ 

£i«r r4 

^«<TFf «- 



)4l A 

/&Hfc7*-74fc 

^ «TT^»!W^ 

t^v A X^iXQik 



T 
7 

TT^rWfT^I? 


>AM 

rAM 


W 



r 

AAl 

0 /W 
























■ .>?:■ M r. ■ 9I 










> 

. 




































• I 

a 






































PLATE XI 


71 


1 / 


74 


■%o 


TffSf Wk 

Wf» 



A>/t) 


m 


U. E. 



72 


o. 



g'itr >-<k<^ 

-y J—XT t- 

YKWW 
l2I ^ 

PK<W" '* 


U. E. 



75 


Z.O. E. 




>AA 

TBT!4 

TTOkim 


Wi 



TTTiffff ‘WRT 

}^<FT 
js5»3i^-q 
^ <^TT ^ 


76 


o. 


g=tffli* ■< Tf 


77 

TTh^A^^T- 

< Aw^nrv 

gb TT^i^fsrsw 

^jSTrrfBSr^^p 

«<^ ^ 


78 


0 f 


Lo. E. 


lintelm^TK 

‘ ‘ ~ ‘ ' ^ 



s m 


O--.- o 

Erasure. 


73 


Tf ^ ^ ^T4§a 
»■ T4 ^ far Tf>4r TTT^tSte' 
tfVrYlTBWR 

T^f >4Tf 
-<y^. 




/ WtTOW 

*46"^<KBE2fc^x> 



u t 

79 

^tam^TTf^r 

^<r^~ 

*■ ^ S "Sr < ^ 

5 j^«'nT^ 
T3ffiT7t£f ^ 
fc& < T7«57& 


rb 






























. 




t 







































































































PLATE XII 


80 






m 

m^a'Y 


TAX'YH TFTM>*^>A- 
^TTTYMK T>4-^^g^^.^ t o. £ .TY^ , vt7tt7 

TYYWOT^ Yfc*« 

A-TTY#^ YT A ig^'g >-« *4 
T^£37 777 47^^37 

» t *# 77^^777 a-^ wST^ 

ATT YXMKYT >A tot 

Trt^gr-sr tft^hb&a * 4 *. , 

T7HX. TfYwTv^MXTA* 

ATT YTgYfTSh#^ 

“i^j^rTf Tnatafi 
T ’YJfiff vAYfl TttA o51 
ATT Y7^73TTj.“ 

T^i-A^j^nr iHhajjf? 

7 m* 



Mistake of 1 
scribe for 


20 
Lo. E. 


A 0 ! 

*-Y7 W && <7 AI. 

tAAAP^ 
73SSYfcSi&6fcA443a 

81 82 

»<<J4g A AY3&&A 0. IDA 17 k$ 

ay<itj^y£7^Y^ 

TTf 6^7777 7 

» ,y -*rr/ /^//x /i///w«/ir/ -y-*/x ♦/, 6 ' ' '' •"/ '/ /, ¥ 

WT> 


84 

<-TAS-7AYfe3 

YWAJTA77X 

Y7AA477A 

TA^-7£Wi8S 

ttiyt ati 

•■'■•T A ^|— 

-yrart^Aw 

«AYf^t3EKr7 

YTWA#*M3A 

M*fi®B£YSr£* 

,5 


Lo. E. A 


IM* <r t7f» 

T^grTFT^ 


85 


£o. f 


T*fs&£3Tlffir 

-A - >A=- 

A 

^^tStk « 


o.]M«jf TMMff 



rfr 




T A ATT-A A 

YM43TAYAmf to /*<HTFfcTfc$ 

/-fTmw^fcJ fc* » 1®mw& '■ £!<&*& * «*ts 
*' &g#$Mr«r ^ wPR# mwyox& 

AXTOf^mY^. 83 a 

bAA^AYlY »-«<l7iX^r A3S7JSTA- 























































PLATE XIII 


86 


tijgf 




7fTJS>4Tf 

,o *T«f3&0F¥r x^as^ 

-thah 


89 

° ?m tpt m 

fe^A$§®£% 
AY&iAfr'p 
*TY t^TK 
S' 


92 


^nT ^u; a j=kt 

^MTf^gT4TnfSR^ 


Lo E/mm. 


szasrp 


^ •.‘W&kx 


amTt>/j 




h&<mi$3 


87 





v, ^10 



am^-n 






90 

Y ® * -YKft 1 fc3 iSA 


Lo. E 


tat "ass /wt&isr’m 

&<fc iTOt 


IllflS! 


/ / /Z&4>9/k*'/k4v‘ 

'm&mmt 



° mrt ***** 

“ Y < Tf- 



88 

ma-^fexA o 
7T® 

■^Sy- rf f^ o 

£*K>*fc3f * 


91 

wgw 


Lo. E 


Lo. E 


*.M»axr at ^ 
ah ^ 
AWTi® m 

« t^s 


TT tSATO «. 
"IA*- 


R. 





10 


M™?' 

m pRcm ^ 

msRis&i «.‘mm 




































1 


































































PLATE XIV 


94 


lA 


° ttt h 

rmrr^&— ' 


96 


» 4 ®! 





t &l >*? <t 

4f4T Tf4T-<|f ^ A^f 4 -^Tr 
TA^TTOTF^TOAA 
TOT Wf «e J^r-ff g* °A 


Tf^TA-<f--«fV 

^mTO^s 

a<y i Tt >4r 


omitted 
scribe. 



R 


V 


A 46MA7 m[^[ tM ¥4 

aavaj 4 t^t m <m 

'A ; E30ftiAfc5rrT -47 44 Tf 4 
W ATT 4A T-4 4T M 44 

An Atjrn a a- ^ 
>-^TO^ 4WTOI A4 


wsn 


^7 

*.j^rT f-^T 


M 


j -4 ^7 >j»hp ■\ > *+ ^ ^mm 
TOtr T W^rTPCYT faSlM 

TfT toato n ■to ^mmm 


STO 

TTfTfTfTTaSgt^ 


-4A<T A 
*4TO«I 


97 

TOgXTTO^- 

>~i$Mks&£k 

TOX.T» 

TOWWh^ 

47 4TO=4 
4JH3TAA7 
tAA^-% 


/? 


» T 4XW 

^— 37 , 'Ar,jw‘v**r't-^-<“rr y ■ >w ’ • v ^ rw 


98 


■MTf 4 TT 4 ^ 4 TOfI 
A *3H. T 4 


%, 

Jjf 


»^AT ^471® 
tA Afco 


£/. £•. 



“■ TTAMAffi^A 
TMTOAffiA 
€4«RTJte4A 

* 44lA4K4m 


A-4 ^A x 



















PLATE XV 


99 


102 


105 


IT 


f A-sA 



Lo. E 


IfctA ATr 

aai rnm>- 

Tifs&fcsm 
*8 < >&■ 


Lo 






W A Tf A 

A Tf Af A^KT>- 
A TfATAMA- 
*T>-£?<ifc:>AA3T 


Z,o. £■. 


0 A flA 


A 

4K<A? tAAAg^f? 

iAAASA. 


& 
w / A 





103 


0 . 


100 


TAs&£3TW 
ATfl^Tf 
* A 1 " - £&■ 

SS®3KTT^ 
>4$ <AS3- A 
¥f£ffiTfcifj£A 
w fcAA^f^pT 


AfeTATAAI? 

Yff^A&HgTV 

*T*ffis&tTO 
M^- 


106 


»TgA ^AYM 








107 


101 

«■ £ A A Tf 
TT AAH^V 
7^ 

/=»/0 


104 

7MA3#fe& 
T 

w 


>TSJ ATtAATf 

YTf^glTT^fit 

T^AWHYTAAnT 

‘10 


f. 


4ff4 



: >a * 'SB&TF isr 

t£k<«gY 


*■ Sf && 





























































































' 





















































PLATE XVI 


108 

A TO 

YTtTOYTT Y3f9TOTO 

t 

tot 4 at ^ 
TOmsA* t as *** 
tott^^ a 


to. £\ 






y miT«ii« 



Yr£^*£ 


IJMIft 



109 


mu 


it? 



M 43% 4 AWATOCTT A 

w 



o.ffW YTOc^ tTO ATYAT 


XigEtt^Y^ 
TOT A «1 >4 41 
YTO^ATXJ^ A 4 
TOTTTTT^W»W^ 

' TO ' 

^TOYT 1 


110 

0 TO:|TVTOYHTO 
THMfcxW^ 

TOTOTOTO 
.*.fc3T YTOYH 

TTTYTT 4f TTO 
T M TOT7 TO 

'»TOA 

83TOY AT AY 

4 


111 



TOtTS^ 4TOA 
Xif & YA T Yt A 

IffgYmAT TOY 

■ 4 ^ 


46 «TT A mm t$M 

i&A 

112 

-TOSIY YTO^TO 
1 YmfeTOYTA 
X^TOTOyA 
7 ATTOI4 iA 

-to 7 a m ^ m 

46 TOYTO 46 

TOTOA3 

bA-4 


R. 






































































































’ 





















































PLATE XVII 


113 


<g 3 H 7 ? JW At >- 

fe A 7 f fdgl a K'-TKSm. 
7 <£307 


'Y/P 
W 


£. 0 . £\ 

10 

A*. 


v . w . 411 ^^ 

p^mYs t* a a 

tffnx- *■ m fea jaw 

#/ _,_fe w a mg / 


Lo. E 


p. 


15 


TTT^ 1 

W A SJH SH 1 W i&Ar WH 
ITT 53*01 PM AWWSSS 



(/. £. 


£0 


ii 4«fc5=-** max ^fwi 

RX A A£S<g 


o. 


Lo. t' 

5 

/?. 


114 

TASMW 

»TM 

•XFTAArTf 

•TTKOM 

TEgits^ 

JA A34^ 


72387 £2 


116 


1 15 


Lo, £ 


O. 


Lo. £ 
5 

R. 


gfe4T \£m$- 

T g A*"" c^ 5 
iY A 

fetxAO 

iTBStsi'a test^-ami 
■ 0 -A '"*4^ 
^>twip§ 78asosr#§ 
a- <« ^ a tfefe «&r2r 



1 1 7 

7737 # 

KfltKTOT'il®! 
CTA7 SIt3 03 

%®. tar’s! 

_, 7 JH &SJ »^K 

S^ffxrmssuew 


tST77 

<<•‘-<7 77177 0^77 
^7777X777£K07k , 7A 
ASfl>AXTfX 7 

a A-ea 7 ta m 

■.mm 


118 

».Sfl AH'-AA# 

70 g-Aati 
-®^T5I«7A 

' X 7 <*< A X t». r 

tjfeAAgHCl 


£ 7 . £. 


119 


0 . 




Lo. E 


£X A7 
A» 7 fe 775 I 7 
T^fcST W 
. 

A7<«7ft^ 

t^551& 


120 

^tr \^mm 

T ^ h~"<T lal 

A^srrr«w 
s w-im 

,@gwtAA 

A<«£:fe- A7 
TStHifeW 

121 

T C ?X , 5^3 iffi 
T1534#SI$W 
A- oil 

‘gpw-« 































































































. 











' 



















* 























































PLATE XVIII 




122 

* T )S >~< Will 
jsM*&W*£n*TF 
i —<P—T SRJA4 


Tf«sr 

faA 



£/. £■. 


^WSyA 

^ <«TfT A 


TMAiS^W 
t ^arsA-iA 
AKAfaP- ^ 



U E. 


t&AW 



126 

T^^gTO 

f «r 

§Y ^ 


123 


Lo. E. 


%^41W 

- '<pr«| 

f j=m A— ^ 

" TOMjfSW 


124 



jjKJITM 

,dS A A 4- cw^ 
>A 

» fcAAAiAir 

127 

“YYATT t^ATf 


130 

‘'"‘ffB'^J-44 YU 
TTSPFFF'P^ 

tat^^-AS' 

J-4fi- 
* T MA A-A 
..MhST3K®F^ 

^ IT 


NMlt: 



lv:/C4 


131 

TA< A4 
J-ife&WgiSV 

1 w ' ■ - • - 


Y»— 8=)& X. 
T«Pff£r£<J^|| 

5 -^|i— ^-77^ _ 

>A -ATFf “A 

askh fas 


T A£A4Y£WA - i- WM 


125 


-WAR AY 
WAfgfA^MfaS 
WlAWTf 
TAYMiA 




128 

ITT Bf s$ AT 
Tf A @ ^'HT 
YfafaS*mTfa3Tf 
Tf7 A4 % 

A— nf f 

»4«1 A 
A 4<A4 



/?. 


Lo. E. 


O. 


129 
t-i hlH 


-MRA-crrm 

Afa 

I faSKLYfcfa^ 

kA<mm 

132 

7 AA'YYYSffif 
YW^I^A 
lATTfWA^ 

5 S4* > 

faKJTYfaS 








































































' 






■ 









PLATE XIX 


133 

j TfT ►* «sr tm 

Lo. E. 

*YM8=^Air- 


R. 


136 

T H >ml 

ir«rr^ 


/=> 

7-^r 


« 



» 



70 




mftlfcfi g* 

140 

mtM?css 

MRB0*«&4nRTf 


77. £\ 



137 

°- -3^5= T^ 


R. 



134 

>&AM3k 



135 

if-mm 

T ^<mTTfTP^W Tg 04^ 

*• \ III / 


Tf j4" ® m M * > 18mt& <g£ 

S A 

141 

oMsmab f? ijf 

^ ^ >3nf 

4W7ATP7 T 

Tf^L4< 


M 




?0t 


138 

m <TT 
1 k& A >3^1 


Slim ^ 

^K fc= ^ 

SfS^TtS &* 

^ ^|f 





^TT4W7<M{^ 


142 

139 

A Tf7*rTf&<jj^ 

T *m S3T 'K 

































































































. . 




















































































PLATE XJX 


133 

'YM^TTj^Wr 

f ifT ^ «3r m- 

Lo. E. 

w-sr mm.. 

HIS XMJ i~-£& 


U.E. 



134 


135 

o ^-m^^Li~wm 


o. 


X. 


T 


136 

f$— >^v 


/?. 


ir«rr^ 



-<f>— 

m 


140 

^Wm.i-4m 

R. 


0. 



137 

&z -3j3: "T l - 

Tt * 7m^rt£T & 

S A 

141 

o.fia'ffiffit^ ff ,s 



o. 


138 

A TP 
Tf K$ a 


T ^mTTFTPfl^W ]g H 


Z,o. £•. 


»= "' 

s WfT ^ ^ 
ilT^ ^ 

^■fl 


7WT-4TF7 T 
Tf^H< 

4T4Tr4Y<Wj*^ 



fet *3f ^ 


o. 


139 

SA ff 

T fcST ^ 


142 

war®- 




















































PLATE XX 





143 


A tja>- 
TH -<A»A 

YWYt^ &$ 
SAA 


147 

§FT4^f A 

Hayaty 

i! ^p-<fcAAA 
,o.sfMc^, ^ 

m'4$M 


-th *er ; a at A 

wmws-im 

150 

% %* 

AA’gaTfemti 
T^AfcAABAsA 
Mfcfet <T A 
AY t; A' 

<i 


144 


«-TT^m K- 
y 


rk>i=t-<Y?A 

ay aaywssa 

fcAAAWf? 



151 


T ”W>-AA£S! 


148 


fel 


La. r. 


A- sA 
53JH AAA 
AAfe A 
WYfc5j&> 

«Basils 


145 

«• t h v$mm 

a A-Yf A T? 

m ^ 

AY AxfefeA 

WWA 


°- g= fct A AT 
A^RA- 
K^JM- 

j a— tnK- 1 

AYAYfe- A 
WllaM 

149 

»-7 W A g- 
Y'-AP’— 

Apts' A- 


Pr 





< U iMigl 
s Y&^ ^~tmk 
f Tf AT A£5Mf 

‘lit 

1 



152 


Lo. E. 


P7FZJ,;/-' 

Sfe 


o.TXYAA A4W4!1 


146 


t-A *& 
iSffiEAW 





AY A 

*Wff£Wf MTg 







































































































PLATE XXI 


153 

0#KTW»f 
*• @1AA« A 3AA 


156 


154 


w/ 



Lo. E. 


%T^r % HATflW 
TfTWAS^ 

TK4T<fcM*mr 

TfAA’ilpfWt^ 
£58* 4 A? ^ 

»>A % 

WTKr ^ 

. fcAA:«t 


£/. f 





R. 


157 




'Wm>m 


5 %* 


Lo. E. 


R. 


10 


XP’- 

>A ^ ^ 


U. E. 



160 

f'^iiS^M.. 

wwwAtir 

°£jL omitted btj 
A*v scribe. 


161 ^ 
o.j^^m 

at j aa 

A A 

-msAfess^ 

tAA^sig 


155 


o. 


'®§k 


>9rT«®WA7^- 

PTW^IgM 

TfA^jA ^tt 
TWT mk. 


Lo. E. 


R. 



®0m. 


Zk 





ȣ5j^BcMr<T^ 
>A A 


162 


158 


o. 


Tfxyr^^wr 

TF^BATpA’Tte* 


o XTT<PP fc&ATf 
T^tt3it3 Jte 
7 fc* j^THFW^M 

TArmyn tar 


R. 

5 


4^\WW 

fcA* A 10 



159 




o. 


t-BTT>n?T4## 

T^AAtAAlf 


163 

o-WmiTSAA^ 












































. 

■ 














































PLATE XXII 


Lo. E. 


Lo. 


msspi 
‘ “{asp 

t ^sm 

164 

o-T^S-^t^EXTfj^r 

Tf^Tfe5J-c^t= 

* <W 

'!T!4T>X Jgf 

Tgg gr )4 

RTfTHX^AgKl 

165 

I^Mtt T & m £JT 
p TT tjto 


IpftB^TTWR- 

W)& Oh jR 

. 


WA& 


-RUT BX fev Tf 

~mm fc= 
32& tat? 



Lo E 



10 


&< 


167 


TtXfTRJ=^TfT H ‘HIST 




i/. £• 







168 a/ 



T]gia , ^TfM« 

T TfW^C^g^ 
7MHlHW4.>%&3nft 
* T A^F>^S»B8?^!E*JF>V 

L. 


166 


o.^m ^ $7^i MiR 

»—ar 



* ^ -w 









































■ 










' 














■ 











PLATE XXIII 


'169 


mpa-^ 

TAmAr 

A^awim 


175 


m 




Lo. E. 


«.TWfe;ilTO 
T mA A- 

i^ki-T f^n'aswrr^fe^ 


170 


o. 


TMtS^AKf^ 





10 


tm^4> 

>A A TIT ^ 

mnt£ Ai 

fcA A^^r 



tf 

4S*ATA» A 

>A A- A A 

tA A 

176 


XATFT^TIA 


4«*=4& 


171 


Tt^Al?AA>- 

t ^ ^sj’mwmm 

B" A )A 


■mAM 

-*Tf7 4i5tJ 

*5AiAA«^ A 

AS A< A- A 
AfiS^tA A1 
* tA A *$&:& 


177 

I 1 —>- 



/?. 



v 


x/\ 


r^gT^^f A 
A 

iAAAS^ 

172 


174 


R. 


o. <TT ^ >— 7¥ 

., , * ,* '//// /. ' 





10 


AES&Yfcg 
tA A » 


l/. E. 


T# A 

(T A4MTf A 
Al ilTlT A 

44^ A 

.. 







































































■ 





PLATE XXIV 


178 

AA^wrmr x 
s IT a~ ax 

179 

ATS A-XI1 A A- 
T A<Ai88fi?m feP 
T^AXSW)AA< 

TMA^n^tsnp? 
5 wteTA- 

•M wxaxaaata 

180 

»T A A- XXT AA- 
TAAAAffmXftfWX 
<f<TpjsT&5^r«r 
XTASSAAKAA 

181 V 

TTW MI# HK 
AAXYMMYXA 

*AtrxHB£5 Ai 
ThAM ATfX 
*7TAAATWAiT 
• WIW^K 
7 T AAT WABP!®f 

W'Ttt e£X 


182 


S^7A««8 FT >4 A ft 
$M A|T7 sA *3 *MtfeA<<TrA 
fc> m ^T A J AS AFATO3A 


^fcSTBPFWTf 
! A~ >XA 
.%$m x «A; 

A -A fefefc -A 


ftn >? 



183 

»MXPi A ASH 

TffljS^TWT^Tf 
& ^ A 


m%k 







omitted by 
AC scribe. 


PA^A 


186 

o V ~ A 

XATf^VY*® 
T^IWTfI.1| 

Tmmm* 

>A AArA 
PA A 

187 

»Af X AAWW 
TffiffWW 

A^m4g«>X 
T^m, FXT 
•TKIW^^ 

TtJ SWAP— 
A AM 
XT A a 

>A A<TX A 
mjltA AX 
PA A 


£o. f 


Lo. E. 


184 / 

I«M AK<W 
X AW A AIWA 
XTAfe^TAA4A(T 
AT AmAXAAX 
XTAXMAXY 
TXWfSMAPA 
« 3» AT A 
XAHteX A-BTfT 

i85 ATAXmt? 

o.X-XAXXL^^A MtA^TTf^AXm 
T TIT 15 W ttf A Wff &&*&&% 


188 

"THATXAX 



























, 










' 

































PLATE XXV 


189 


o. 


mi’eauL^nm 

^ ^ AT At 7^ 



192 

TfKSTTM^WW 


fff^KKTf^^ 

Ipr » a a 

it^SKTirTTm^ 
fN-:s* wittattw 

iff^KWK@ >mRiaaa^*®4i 


L ° f T£i tfe£ff Jl -A Tf Cr ”“” 
TMTT>*¥MrSPr 


wwwrawi 


193 


' mm 

190 

73® 

191 

<'•^7'®^'?? A7 
T < AST^tOTHO* 
w^A7m>wrofl 


<&tm\ w«7m 
<Y’f<TfYf^ttJtm- 

tJ 


io £■ 



»1W«W 8T 
*«<■** 
^ -«< T ^ 
mixts au 

AA A 


U. E. 





194 

TTT-^PdT'W^fe 

)A mtm 

®w 


Z-o. E 


WKKZ 




Ttjrt 

tsr Aa 


195 

o-T 

^ £^g,— 

TPfrmW 

IT j&TTTte- 
<7 £TTT T>— 

tt axil m 

Y? A YTT- 
^«0T£ftAT 


SYim sS 
m*3K« 
Sism^A 

>A A' 1 ' - A' 
tpsyW 

196 

».<T8 0>- Kfll 
< IT YA 

KIHW)4A« 

'TWTW^ 

AS^TT^ 

TEgfrYlTTA 

197 

A @g^V- 
tt 



ATW« 

TfXYT^fct* 


77Ss 


V <•' 


'"■Stf®£21 >^v 

3 











PLATE XXVI 


198 


to. E. 


>WSSP4TT! 
t$WT>- 6 X fefc: B? A 
I- W 4P-XL T 
•=7 IT h? Pf- >-^K 

b6T mmgsTm* 

ft#? ^ ewr w -<5- 

<«TT>fll W, ^ 1M 

BATf >— T ^ 




^ A 4^5-3^ 


199 

•yt^^ 

T 5s&fc*s7 ^ < 

TTY TT'Y y£ 

■TWtutw 

"Y^r w Wt| 

*.«Y4^rT 
i ^ ^ 3 H 

.. 

fc& <Tf T ^ 3 i^"'" 

m, 4 ew $ w=j fc» > 

T £4 >4rTf 4[>— ~Y 

T ^ WTPf 1 >^^jiff 

M *MT ^ ^ ^ ^If 

XiPg^ fc^4X " 


/j 

£/. £\ 


200 

•>-£ff *@=TT«f 
TwJW4<mfitoi 

TT^ft A ^ 
s fe=BTTfe fc%>x 

*. <X «« ^ X 

7>AK$i>^Tf M6 

»M>^r ^ 


201 

i-iffcY M IS 
1T-<Y jgfTWmn^ 


& * 

■Jtes^wwi- 


W/4 



Tf>£4fKT§&»~* 

ti ^mmm^i 
*aa»s i ffc2r£* 



TRJTTHWTi^ 
T fiS&MK If ^ 


t „. T ^ 44 

,«W<n^ 

,, t^A^W 

203 

^mw’sto 

°fe3<f’ omitted Ay 
[■-1' scribe. 


t«SWH 


.sxfemwH® 

*Y4f 


@ A ^ 


*•& 

>46 4!4>— 

WTfeSri** 



WT^WfeSIX 

WM»«B 













































































































I , I 




















PLATE XXVII 


205 


K 


T^fkter HR 

WT 0?>^<nW3*a®fF 


Tf 7 WF ^ *& 

i&$ m w? <& 

>«• «TT ^ 
hHESH t£f ^ 


Lo. E. 


_ 77 ■fiSSE ^£X >4$ 

* fcViw^S 5 ewrtesi-cp— 

* 0 -<X v^* 

£tP*2K7T^ 

fcoT 



•<m^Tf>4M 
*■ Win w»itS 


£o. £\ 


206 1 

w*r 

Y^3^2R<Wm^ 

^g^TW^g^ST 

’f TPf\T% fc & t^TTf M 
Tf >4 < 4 ^^ WTM 
@» 



209 


212 


"•fT^THawfnsiKf 
yyjfimt&w? 

*7 T7 ^Tf te- s Y>*k ^flr^K^r 


^<ifym4if|| 

^ttywotS 


T&Sf^nnrTgtf 

*. *-*wr y tp ^ 
»m et fca 'iwa mm 

7T>7Kfe^WT r 

207 210 

.^f!SH«tin^iT «»W4tgfY<t!M TW^jiai 

& w 

' lYTgfeT^W TW«a a WW%«1 
«£= an <iwfei* 5 sr€TWf^4i»“ , w 7 tisr m 
^fcWY XT >j3B& ^»TT3iK ZPK Tf XT 1 f fete 
TP'T ^ fW «g TtSSY fcW^XtK 

213 

»-T#7>-7 «4 XT 
1TT^sCTWWT>«® 


^acn <t5T>— 

7 te «7 kT TP 

^ tp 

T ^ ^TfTTfeSr 
Bife TTTT«. 





'«T£?^ ar 
>^-<w^ass7ta^ 


208 


211 


214 


»THI^TWT>-YH “WMMUM te •jf>*r m 





























































■ 
































■ 

























PLATE XXVIII 


TT^WTf^R-^Tf 
>—SsY 


218 




5 

/?.' 


'/V// t /. , s /.. 


215 

*WWW| 

TfT^t^fpsr 

5 ^ ^ 

t# ^4 

Va 


216 


4& 


fim f 


-43HH 



/£» 


>« -^Tff ^ 
^4 «« 



217 


«3HWWM 

1 gfr^WffT 
TPtfT}Gfc3Wf< 





.^^.8.'V'vliv 


219 


" TTJ+f >T ^#ff>^K 

’fTj£*T>-lfc| 


PjTpw '// v\ 

illwwwffi 

^/, / ' VW . / 


m 


R 







220 

°t ^ m K TOW 

Tf>4 ATf’gYl— 



TfiYT >^mnw 

jK'n 


/?. 


maw &k 

4^- 



222 


T^KTtTTTTf °-TT>— 



T^targHFjwi 
*£3#$. TFt « 


221 


o. 


T»-4cW W>- 

tt>— mi&= 

TTVKW 



u. *f*» 


f§- ^ ^ 


223 


gft 


TTTH^aJITM^ 

d <Y omitted by 
- scribe. 















































































































































































PLATE XXIX 



224 

TWM^>- 
"HSfftfYiCr. 

J T 


Lo E.\ 


Ms 


W6P 

"I3&S95W 

* 1 tesr £i 

225 


*T» 


-or ^r^n> 

TT 


^ *« t= ^ 


226 


Lo. E 


10 

R. 



mw 

XT^tSTW 

smAmmmfK 


"m^Tf ^4, 
■T4BHKTWM»£r 

TW4^M4g$f44 

^t}>1®IJTi^WM 




Mistake of scribe for 


mm 

mNkcw *& 
mm aw- tm 

v'ts/mSs, ., . ^ ^ 



.■""A 


m 


tas 


M 


227 

■■<r 

MKT>*T3>£ 

mm 

^ <TTT ^ 

>a a. 

W7W» 


229 

o-m^^AiKmmi 

m mts 

tfrmitAWmaM 

“'■nfcfcflmTTFTF 

M TfT Tf Tt 
-Tfc^W44>tT^ 


mistake 
of scribe. 





230 




V///M 



K- 


'TWWSffTfXT 
















































































































■ 


. 





Ill 

'..V 




p ■ | 



. 








^ Cq 


PLATE XXX 


233 


jsr<^«*£r 

v -<£.' ' " 1 

“4. 


®-T^r>^5jJrtter^s^ffjQE<Ff 
7h*>w 1 
UJXFfT!WMj 



*& 

TMtBTF m m 





‘-BMMS?F>T£?rfc 

.. .... . ,. „ y . £&> 

t ^x^Tf w®^«maTn 

■ *- . 



i^mf* 


7>W>^ 



o omitted by 
scribe. 


234 


u.e!'//% y 


o. 


232 

>-X 


>- 


T< 




^CTTr&cTTT# « 

tf ^ t^HFer’ 8 ?^^ j« 
t >4 j^r >xrTt^4Tirt^ tJ 

T m TF >^i#$mFm ^ ^5 
7WK>^H3KT^ |g®f" 





TJ^FFTT^T v-ff 




















PLATE XXXI 


Lo E 


*.7HW7W<7A , , 
t7tw<^^A77#S1 
mw^f tfm 

»^s*£3ky^ a ^ 

W?t£f 


!8^Wfc*7 ^^WT^TTf 

"Mi wrw && , m 

«■ *117 W*W TOffi 

AS 


L E. 



fc^A. 4^p 


235 


237 


o-7 mmm* <v v at 
A*g wasssBf^ 
7fe7A ^TTArAATAA 
7 73A7 AA^ATA^M 
A^atJteWTf a ash 
AfeATf AAAfeAWi# 
feST #31 >46 77 AA^KT*— 
^ 7^-77 v^rA-^-Tf-VTWf® - 
77 >AAfen>— 

"A- XHTfA7>-7^JA<Tf 
7%&t3lWf E A f&~ 

236 

»■ fprn tes&rj* m t» 



« 




<M7 AAH7 ^ A 


«w a- tw jst >mi twj it 
Ato ►- saw-< *a a ~uM $if 

7 && H* ^7*^1A$BT 
lAAfAJTt ^m<7>AWAA 
5 Tpyr AAM77 A >- £«% 
33A >37 AES 737 TTA^felS Ajljfl 

AT®fA 
*■ AA^ATAAA 77 XT 

TA^TrTgYFfgpAWft 
t m-j 

it t meiAi at <nn#* 

iai7^8»«g 
» AW AIHI7 A A A A 
TKYT^MTTf fc^f 

73gAYfcW tAfcSTg 



238 




a Enrg* « »- ^ aa 

"7WT7%^ 

At^rtwwr ^ ^ a 

-A ^ 

7 >^77777 ^”7 MW 
T ^ 

7>33XHT7tT7 ASStf- <S 


o.A tATAJ^WJfJfffAA 
A A fcMAtWsKlTt 
7 A tA4s AW )-#>- 
7T A <77 v^<77^%-»A| 

'Wte^fePTM77 
TT^AP^fefe 7 ; 

7 












































































■ 






















PLATE XXXII 


*. i— <y h- 

»T«f )4>#TT 
TMfc^g 


239 


Y -$?tt 'f fifll^t W 
<Yi®K- T SW 
Tm^>WTT#H®<P- 

TOTfca w& 


yttsskjih^ um 

"II^rr-<<?;gj 
Tfr<^Tf77WWEIT 


241 


o. 


wM' mwiw HW'mgf 
>sr 3 !j£ « tsot ^*«rr***«^ 


Lo. E. 


/?. 

/J 


<W»fff )^»5^gW+YTWWJ?F^ 

Bffl 

m^W Tgff a7g? 0 is£M 

; >«t g*m tt^tTs: is m=- 

11 ^ n&fcSTrT'TfTf Tf^^ffPI 
Tfl» @= W wDf T? 0mt 



% w jf ^Wg 8W«ymS^«3R 
TffTIT^ Tf 

»*= 

TMg>- CTYT h9Sff ^ ^ tfXWf 

TiTirg t is ^r 3H 'll ma ^ 


240 


o. A: tar 

:§toTfM^3T^>« 

§|^«agy@ww$ 


*• 7 R-7T &c 1 <Tf 

n^m^iwmB- 


V. E. 


242 

»fWWOT«M ^.TFAl <Tf\ 

Tjrrow^ >-y -p ^~ 

T jggflTpgg *4KT 
'■WB^-CTT^ 


gi.4«£3-3& 

243 

*TP^7ff>^77g( 

i^r-K^fcSr 5 

TWAW “* 


244 


§BM# 77 * 

!r*Yv<ww»3Mp 

^miMKHtfl 






































. 














































PLATE XXXIII 


247 



/5 


Wi% 

zV'/teM 


AAA ' 



o.Cf ATT AM V^ AH 

M(<<Aff^TA^T£g a4JSAA 
fTA AATTM tJ 

AI^APm sir Am ta 

t|AW>ATW 
AAAS^I tgar-gEi 
. ^Tt^Tf fcSS % 
MA AA 5? <—A— 


JJgH Tnv^Tf 


/?. 


245 



m A tt ^ m ^ 

ma a m #4 fcA 4 MM 


^-m 


mi 


248 


TT W^S^TW 

tt t tr 

- AT M M3TA- 

«mm«^ *& 

>A «< 4^ 

WTW 
AAA AM 

246 




>1 A A 4^ | 

TTAA^TA^AA 

^MAA^Kirm 

ms i ta m 

tA, A 


«-fe. an gfe tser aa m 
Y M. ^ £M^kaaatit 

matTT ^r £3 TT 

TTTHTm&mMA ATT 

J-H <p-fHT'Y A 

>-4 AT f0# A 
*^A^MT>AAA ^ 

TT4AT AT^TTTTT^feM^K 

"'T A A ffi TfXTTSTPm « 
TAPY.A ATT TTXTT^AWmTmYX 
AAHT M^«,^Wt^>T7T 
Af ATT ^,i|fff#h 
A *f KTffJjJp I^TT A 
»AT AT A A3S£tT52f M 


£/. £. 


tA4^T& 


249 


iSHiAA^ATTAAn 

YTTf»4MTOg2<^A 



















































■ 



































PLATE XXXIV 


/l '"" 




Lo E. <//* 

" Pi 


Lo 


*. few. 

VW T vx 


250 

^^Mg^rnmm 

*rr tw^ibww^hk 

IT TWAf^TfTW^ 
TT 7j& 


u. 


s^tJj^fTf MP— 

*■ XJ p4t > ~T>— 

^tt ^ 

^ «< 

-vm. i fca &k 


VrJ','W,'/. y, > ' 

wtwj^te 




252 




15 
V. E. 



254 


)§£»&. IBS gJHV- 
Ph j^TXgST T>— 

fe$H* )^E3« 


TT TWfel^lIp 


fAW 


m 


TT 1 

Z YXM3W ^Tf 7fT4«T^F 

TTM@TTMW4®tfTfT^ 


U. E 



m 


251 




»7TVMT 

tW« WV 

TT>«< m^fc 
TV « XT <-<K 

-Yff T^gh- 

-«T flpbV 

T 
Xff 

Tit kk to.Mj$$m -<er 
V&TFH¥f>AftgK«i 

t-S^ T^tT’K-Vf^ 

'TW^WSJTW &3 0X % <T AX 
Tt~TWf P-V ™ 

«t pf^ "■ f w fc^r ^ 

P»«W|-1T)»W tX < 
WlWW^ffW 

WTtSP«tm»M 

»xyttm ^<^£swew 

pjasgXH^Mr^MVu. / v tt^ » yn 

253 

•’■TTS^Mf*. 

TM t@^fX 


8 = 


255 


£3>- 



Stnm^R77T» 

AP W 







































.. 





















. 


























































PLATE XXXV 


258 


256 

°TW •048^: 


«. t er -<?- ^(wKn»n|(«reffl 

T*-WBf wT44W«T44rW^ 

Y Ife TT 4 tt3fe3>=f 
^4 T 4 M ~Y 4 if 


'«n^ 
m&i ts#* 

T ^ TF4 *@$M<X7444Tffl 



259 


T/Z.tS'«t/7. 



** m 

R &¥0i 4^- 

4SSTt4^^i 

257 

0 JtP^T^^MWTY^ 

T4^4Trar«^T»<® 

TF4^TM4?T4®P^ ^ 4$44M^ 


£o. f. 


T# : 

71 >03SJ* 4 TFT TOSF4-4 
tam«S M44 Tf >4MIHF 

-imm,^ 7 a 
5k< 4 nm14 >-» ^hm 
4 an m a 


Ao. £• 



|>W*n >444 

k " 

4«WTO 
WKM$4fafI 

|H 

TfTYTg , ^@r^:T4T»*| 


260 


i/ 



TTT4fe4KTFTTt4^rTT<<K>M^ 
TTXTT m W £T &>- 4g ^gii 

t wmh^MVivm 

^tjn 4 <t>- m&t g 

TT 4T m,0M^ ^ 4 

<T S wWff^BTF^WW^Y 

^ >=f«KT&£ F4?4«T^'4r 












































■' 



' 

















PLATE XXXVI 


*.lw^jg^T4 M & 4fcg( 

'*-&$£& ^ 44^44 

fe >3% < 

« *P4 T4-fc4 t44 s444 

T M. 

^PHS-TKY 
T >4 t®? 

^^4W46 4("T«> 

uflH f©aTts4* 


261 


Lo. E. 


10 


o IB m. tw j- a^m44 

^ 44 

>~<fcS£rW t^wiwp 

^4 334 

<«t3T44 >- 
^448 4 

7v*^TfcgqgMSWv3 
)^ 4 

«. 4 « bsr TvffM «>« 44 

YTWS@ S3 47^4444 
T^XRTfl?m3^*0-« 
TfTJSmfll^TTOt^ &* 


«4XTT v^MSTf 44^ 4f?& 4 

wt^tefw^a 
<44n t MltmTfrn & wr 
4 414 « ^ 41=4 

"■* 4<^ 4- >4 <« fe= ^ 

« 4$ 4^=44 iMM 


262 

“■ 4Fg 4 4? 3OT34^S«!? 
4(44 URtMTlK^ kS444 


t-430744- ^44TMM>44 

4 4 ^444'WlBlt 


'»4Tg 444RTfl^llteW)4^ 



U. E. 


N4 4 m & 


263 

°M ^ m 

>—<T>—T >47^7 

13^ M.)^ 

-JgS^iKW 

44444744 


°- r 4~s4 

&AM& 

i.Mt4 47 4 


266 

m^g 

0 .jpT7I44 

|I|fe<44- 

264 

WlpW* 

°-43T 4 ) ~<4i 

, IIIW 

744WW 

*■ \m^ 

m^K 744? 

mm 


imrnmm 

5 S4>^“ 


267 


»4'g^4r4 

265 

T7T4B4 

■ 


4444fe7 

^mwM4-<4a€ 




















































* 
























■ 


















































PLATE XXXVII 


268 


Lo. E. 


^WSTikTT-^BBSf 
-ffl Bffi 

YAJSTMAW^f 


fcAAAfr 


275 

»-Y0AWY4^T 

TfT^tg^WTferZ. 


271 


o. 


twy»3&y>- 
AgAWAA 
TYTWS: M w& 

« ww^- 

ifWWlJL 

bAAAWg 




269 


272 


to. E. 


o-TTB^W-TTIBI^ 

Y^itT 

'Tnm^tH’gfae 
TSa&Wmww-W 
-owtss&HiTTTf 
**»■Tnja ^ m 

•■'SlJB. ^£5 A 

'■’THr|3)^ , >-S:^ 

^ \A t 'Et^ A 

WAffRt^A^ati 

270 

YTOfctAiA iSM 

tmt w4 *s 

TfTAA)AT{^A 

5<TAY?TTTW'^Tf 

v^A 


/WWW 

WW<« 

273 

Y tAf 

*^teAAnTA 

A 

274 

O. ,1 '' "' ' VT 

fcAAAffPtl 


U. E. 


276 ^ 

o^ yt 
i^PYVgnTOYft 

Ag^YWAteA T 

^grthaaftY 'WZcrTi 
feM)-ATA^ A 

AAtST^AYtAYI 
YlW^ttfflM^ 
TfXYfAff AYF fc^g 
^ATA^YAIA 

277 
o. 


10 


TWA^vgPAW 
@Ate£W>— 


278 


ft 2rTTMTTteS®rV?W 




































* 











































PLATE XXXVIII 


T Hfe *-WTW &303W 

T <T THfr m 

s TM ■^' t WKT»- 

■ as M A<;w^ ^ t »-'-Tia r {S ^ 

, 


^Wfl8H<$rB. 


285 


279 


»ttg^A-Tr AKasigra 

TOm-^lTT^K 

<r^g ^^wwwwj 


Wm&k 

"TR'ytwt^^^ . _._ tll ^ l 

T^^t^'pfSTfTYTB^'W 

A9m^<«^TfXT 


to. £• 


282 

tAw fe?T 
ITf^lA^gKIl 
TWlg TTX.T 
sT 14 ^ if )A vA- 
If® A Af 
'-4 >A AAAXY 


•Tvmffi&m 

YM 

TTf^MWWfef 



to. £■ 


/0 


mrrmfeAai 

^ -<^ j^\ 

MtfiiKT^ 


286 


75 

U.E. 


teta*A< 
MAT AT 
fcA A^ 



W 



280 


A . .. 


»AW & 

.. W1»»^ 

fc&A-m^ ^’k.TJ^^f 

ASAST-A 
Y&nAgYfcfe 
SAjsTA’— 
SgA#MTA 


283 




raEH^iH^gl^ ^hmwaa 

' . 

AWsWm 

feAAA3^ 


W/IImKA; 


-m * <r« ^ W* 
maAmtAAsM 


281 


°- YS S' AJ il jSjH a— 

A Sr 

THKk 


-mM^TfA 

A^u^-xmx _... „ 

TfA^mmsfA 

287 

83^TYAW$ 

i^WSISTOPf* 
*W^Aj^SS^S0!; 

S AA 
*®AA<TTT A 
)AWAY3WAA 
fe^AAS-H 


284 


*TTJ5 TY A 
OT^WWA 


Lo. E. 
























■ 

































. 























■ 

























































PLATE XXXIX 


288 


292 


Jl# 

*■ ^ 


»WfKti5TTf,MM TMTM'7>- 
fe^feBSW^W; ■^a’H'TW- 


289 

TffW^f^T)-1? 
»-iS ATt 

290 


Ti£W^>3fTf 

*-*TFT 




296 




293 

oTTTBIWM 

TTOMSmTOiffiJ 

M-WKgl 

a^gsRt— 


»-<MWfl^ 
-crfegg-R &m, 

tja&rrs&titfM 


TMPfffJHnaaH^waSIf ’SW<5 , »M«g8 
Y^-XT 

TTT > £HSg;^^<#! J aTT^a^- 
IWt^ffK^Tl 294 '• 


297 

o.fe 

t? Mr 

T TM *<53W< 


*-TFT 

291 i 

Y ® ^YTrtM 
T!vCfWEft^fW^ 

>A<A t -8m-^'K 


<< 


“fBPM 

^.■YTM^HTT o 
WS^»^S3B 

295 299 

»nra'^nw^s4 *iHTffl 
YTOfc^T®£li t^T'P^TfS^ 

ttw# *£&=- mfe >- m 


298 

' «: 

>1 

















































































PLATE XL 


k &4MM 


*- i# fcXT Ssf S’ 1 - ftiA 

kw 

*fesfgiK\7TT^ 

<-<t=f T£= 


•■wmm 

T ^S£L ^ 

hasaAp xtAM^a: " 


307 


300 


o. Pf^AflM 

gBOTJJ®h 


303 



(Jvi, 


t i essw]gjffifl$wff 

a^testA- 


£o. E. 


o. wsr ^Tff *gn 

T^I® AkTPJT ERAA 
TvW^^WT-^Wf^ttS? 

< ! 

^^trr«w at m>m 
A gr itvT >-A- ir-t«j«8= 
«wi««siwi 


301 


». ^ WS» 


TWA 3®V 
ATIT “Ktmt 
K ’mAA 

T 3«fl>- 
AsTTT T^fcA- 
< f^gz 
AY 1H 


/0 


4‘SPfl 



/?. 

5 


Y MtAifTf A 

fc^-A^ie 

302 

<-.rv^Wk®SK- 


304 

■TWWX»Kjf 

TW®iW 

A>Aa^AATYtAAnT 

ATTTAv 

305 t< 

TH^XM® 

fc&W’fffcH&S'lf 

Twwagsrmm 

306 

'.YH^TMA’BSTV 

T^TiATTm^ 
Y'A? ATT kA 


R. 


10 


;g mmm ®ak 

^0#W®Wt 


-W «iHA-^rT&fefe«®rx, 
» AWYimfeM^Asoj; 
A WT0aa TKTTAYA 

308 

Y^TOfpff ata 

ww^iifis!wa»r 
1 ^SBCW^JHKTHpr< 

TnjraXjAO 
^AYAtHkfc 
AffiAH ft 
7 A-ij ^ i^TTT’^S^ 


mm 































. 


























































PLATE XLI 


<t Hssmm * fc* 


liti 


309 

*TBtf?Rp&*Tfc$S 


R. 




310 


». < *m <ro- 

Tf ' 


7 

TfT^mTO 

r. «<Y>- viYn^=- 

'«^ ^ ^SSSMflK. 


312 

^iS'WTOTfr 

T » ^TOf^R 
<$ff* STOS^ 
TTO ^ 

TOT SflTO 

TSTOTT^T^T 

313 

TO£f^s£gf 

1W^ M 

TTT ftSAB a 

S§aTO<« 


316 

»• >4- 0«WOT 

mWWttt 

TTThEBTO 
*-&g* ^ ^ 


317 


wo> 

O. 'pm 


m 

MB to it It \mmv''% 
m&m. 


■ftiwwia 

STO^f HTO% 


/?. 


314 


»08a-<wM^ 


318 


i 


C/. E. 


311 


o. -\ 


TO^STOTTts 

TW^i^TO tpL 


°.Tg l gr>TY®£T> 

TO^wf4t®^ 

T , gi%9*#T^V ■»■»« 

W fc£T K- 
-TH7W&W 

-*tm t^r# 

#•— is 

A ^Tgr *. w^shii 


w 4 toro 

w#»wi 


TWH^ffW^T? 

TTO>TOT>iTO 


II 


Lo. E 


^®I^X T H 315 

* Wm T m IT £3T 1 ^m«rrm 

TfT TO 7 att»«re» 

»*. ^g= # <& 


319 


°f3ET¥^K: t ®4f4 

am<®f( 

T 0TO«TT^7F 
^TTT^feSK- 































































































J B I III 










' 






















■ 
































PLATE XLII 


liSf <J»- 


320 

irjs'^^OTt^Tv 

J T 

T 

^<^3IfcM^£!j| 


321 


L- 


■4^0 feS^)<- 
^gnT^WT ’ES 


322 / 

°7 I 0')4^-«^3OT 
T S 

•sbs^ t^<4®pii 


323 

-ITTMmMAW 

am <?r ^ 


«^W4W 





325 


Lo. E 


R. 


10 


t3 
A 


328 


?E 3 PH®*£W 

'SfSl^TT^ 



il 


c-m^mr^ghSl 329 

mmrmMOTM 
*■ ^ ta a m <& m-TH >^®rm 

5 YM^r 


326 





327 

o.TWW^mt 

mm a tt 

'KTfT^fc^SH 

f£TOYT^ 


330 



331 

im^®» 

IpKreww 































* 











' 


































■ 


















PLATE XLIII 

IS 


338 


ft^m 

-u - 


y ws sffgp *s 


332 


335 




o. 


o. 


4! 






,„Tf)4fTWm &— 
*<r^4^m44>44 


K. 




339 



“'fit 


336 


>ff yd'WA'4& 

r///, wy yy/// ybvfi 

<mWM0M?» 



333 

IfefctS 4Ttt4 
<3KW^#'TM *•■* 
Tf4^t?$l4t4 

*sM?B[ ^>4 
TTfe2&4EHfT Mm 
*)-XM *S 4^451! 

4<rr^ >^ttt^ 

334 s 


W W14 Tf v4r 
ft S v*«T>Wr 
TtasrmaM^ 

gw w$®m 

m ^ w 

Wfc* 

w 


>4^4T?4 


337 


Y34W>^44 
ml >444 


Him vms-mom 

A 

fH 

w®, 

4f||pw^«M 

:^M=F JL-^Tf 
>—“Y>— X 
TWI ^44 44 
Y7h30gt^£»44gRr 
*4 <4, 

340 

rrVr/ '7 W y-'*^r*r</S/. ?5^/^/J5t 

O. £ 



/5 



4^t4W 

$y<mM 



1&3 M, 4<n4^m 














































































■ 















































fll ' I 

































PLATE XLIV 


341 


Tf^r 


344 

^iBsnssrnwr 




Lo E 



^ °ssl 

omitted bp 
scribe. 


w r tew ^ TTT^ 

HgT *-** & 

mmmmt 

*~ JgtT 

hrn _ i —• k. . 


fife,# 




PfiSS HTO T )^%S; 



U. E. 






























352 


354 


PLATE XLV 


mm & 


Erasure. 


Lo. E 


>-«PP3>Y<MTM3£r 

74X« PRA<M^A7 

4^ s<i 

4T7f^lprf 




•C ff* 


353 

mmwn ts* m tfert * 

At? fc£. 7T«* -ffl ^ Xfc 
'TfVH v-^M^^TTTTOJaW 
<r^ 

TfT ^Sffi ^4 

* "T^-T--^ i\ 

»TO1 ^ £3TWTTW£* 1? 
T'fie&^f^WT^TO. 
TTT & ^ A? i^AWWfttY 

^7»4&&WH&>-^TWh 
»A, fcjrr & &ato'ta 




TM 

fc&43$8^ 


355 


•TlWWSffi^ 
TH^SKWTM 
AA gpi&smffl 

.Tf^T^: ti g m- 


356 


»<YWW4 


TO 

Tt>^m,^%-Yfc^ 
fei= i$.3$>- 




TO 

7 A4TOW4Es4 


**Mg= TO4^>^TO 
‘£®£TO 31 fcA 4. 4^- 

















































































PLATE XLVI 


358 363 

T S^TTTOTT^fWr^ ^JKK'T'flg^fc^M 


o. 


359 


^MOT^Ps*! 


360 


»Hj®m 


TfT^F -<fiT)^ kRX 


364 

368 

°RTHWIMB 

T «f tar <!>- Sff 

AfcfB TR3 T W >-$ 

365 

"■WP»f 369 

TTW^S^s^ TFf^fc^^^-ffLSm 

*■» hk TBs&Janrm 

* «^«e<wa. &w pk- 


366 


TWi&frRSfcW^ oXJfJWMTf^ 370 

TP^WT^T tiWlW^ »]H^WWK^TT>S 

>=e gp Tr^WOTI^ffi YHam^^Ti 

g «>-«$ lTWTI5W«%tt 

T Dittcgraphg. 5 t,7V$wm& tm 

362 U.E. 

»tw^k?R 'z&mmi *-g *&■—<s* 

^mT@klM^TW 

‘Tfl £W[ feS^ 371 

J, ^g- 367 0- 

*«T* 7fcffS3T* A<& 




















■ 








































































































PLATE XLVII 


a a 

*■& 

asa Amu, a-a^-|i 

372 

°^*g£bw^ feAAxAmi 
AS *W A7A7 feSMfeTAA 

«m $t xahaa^aa 

l j9SS- R.fcAA^H 



373 

A A^A-tA AlAH 
twa aa &k a 

aa«£a 

*i£SB A7AAA^- 
|I ^ ^TAAAm^AA 

AfTF 

TT T POT 


£o 





o. E. 



feTA 


TIA® tTTT 

ap samara 

374 

“ 7^0^ ^W®IP» 
fc#7 X A? A 
'■&$ A 

AmAmixtAAAa^ 

375 


Am a a ^ k 

‘-grr'W^PI )-A ATA 
71 g 

IA AT 

ma ATOM- 

376 

«• A 1 0 A AI 71 A 

j&W&>'YTfT3fc& 
0? aggf AL TO 
TfATTAXSftAfel 

TfT m ^17 
-HT^KA HKTf A 
fes^r 3f <i A 

a a 

377 

77^*1 

7 &r>* at A mi 

■•*• imm=A)AA71 

m I a A ai% 

PsaAmmAmw 

378 

J«m M AI 
JA£f wATAAAS 
Utm asa A m 

'^2L&A&fc& 




































































































































. 






















































PLATE XLVIII 


379 




381 


1 t? *m ^Kn^ra 

^mtw^ aato Ai^ro 

X AAM 

TMTOIfe ATTOA^tTOff 
AATOTOTO^ 
T^TOmiA^A&^ITFgXI 
T m TX>^ <R 

tAA»I 


'• AT Y1 AA<T1 

^\'m'% t £M<fffK 
fcAAAg ^ 
XgKATO&A 
TAIW&W^X 


10 
Lo. E. 



aAt 


382 


380 


«. Mi A A A *mK W TO # TOSS 
T1AJJAS34 A1X17 A -<31 jA* 


aa 


omitted by 
scribe. 


AA^APX 



AX 71 xmM 
ttlSTW 


'»TfArAfeX fc^TS 
-AMTTTmiAClf 

IT 7TA A A- A7KAT MA 

«tixyt m aaae7 tit a*t^ 

T fcJTf TOT M£77 T AS ^TAlfX 
77 03S X g*1TT tea AH 
T IS ^JKTIXTT ATAA 
lA^SX fet&l 
» ^<MA AS A ^ m£ A«^ 


HATTONS® 
77AAAATO3A 

■'AM "' 

383 

-MTO7T4X 

^ tAA 3 ^^ 

384 V 

it gAmrroA 

U^ATOiTW 

^7’H PffM 

XB^AflWTOA 

AX 




fcA AAist-'ll 




























































































































































PLATE XLIX 


385 ^ 


387 


* T HTf ^ *W 

Msyt$ i^ba t j^t 


j£ g^IKlM T fe^SITM 
7T^te<Tf^^|f m&K 


ht TKaiw ^ ® 



» *&<%&& 

Y.BT7 

fe mn^^ftass^ss 

fe0YWW^^> 

baYi^^wsair 

» fefctTOYT tots 

tz t3r^Tv^4P56M^DS<, 
tt3T 7‘S&iY TR TpPf 
^BTTTWflTA'lTW'ffie. 


AJ 


U E. 


T > S®aiX.m 5 tI5T7WTfTfiM!® fe^T^S! U 

&r^r m ^ ^<i ^ yyy w w=F<tf 

7*mH$m ..^-t j**fc$t* 


7 Y 



IIP 



T Wm 


386 


388 1/ 



s4ghfc^T7^m^ 7 Tf 

7TTM TT^^Yi^Ya^W^ 

5 Y m TTKFY M 3* ^TY^^KTOM^Sil 

Yte2f^^Tf fe? Y Wtt@®|t£n*- TIT^YUMiTM £ *■ 

Y^fe-Y <Y ^L ^ TWMW^WK 
ii,H®^flP!RTf>^r3&«-tS&K YYiSlWY^feTtvtA^ 
Yfc^Y^FYY Y>Yfefc7^>- “Ya^g^l" 

» ^f-t i m^ "JS's^'n^&’B^M 


Lo.e. <TH3f<Y >«> *£=- 

» Yft-^ *« Y7 ^ 

WL^ «S«- &s7 4ft 


/?. 


T 































































■ 




















• tj 11 






















' 




















PLATE L 


IWWa -0L 

%%!£ hr 7 pf g^r 

««-TWft®W®S^>-^SiT 


389 


*<* ’S y^m ts^fiFbls^ff 

>*TO?7**£3? 

■ & < mp> 


390 


«TW ^WT"^-?J[ 
T?T viK^jfcs 

m 

V \ S Ki^ -.i. ,- . . Tr . "-rr- ^S-T* \ >rr'.'X^</'< 

*• ^ , “ 


KTT mj£RlSlTt3 W 
T g^Tf WT 

..wt 


391 


«■ >m3 ^jra ^-xt ~m ?pt 


tte^WH-’w-jEri 1 -- 


<n as Tf h=r 
ty ta * 

fcff gitH 

ms --<%■ 


R. 


JO . 


392 


o >$>0'l r >-#T 


TT^TM^WT^Tf 

*7 j&>YriTO^TnWT 


7T TW^'?3fm , j£fW3r 

7j^>-7!W7WtW 
— TfT>^-<W>^ 
'•7Tt£>7HMP TjS^ ^ 

m»^7*nw=H3T Mi 

TfT^fe^E-^ 


TfY7m&^>4rfR 





393 


o- w it^ ^ g fffijjs^ 

























































* 





























PLATE LI 






jL 


W& 

* 1%iM$M0&&A 3%SM 



395 




>& ^ 




4 o. £. 


YTMTfc&EW&i**- 

•ITT m ^ ^ r 


Wax/ 


396 



U. E. 


mrifTh^pf 



397 




M’T 

TOTW 
At 























































































PLATE LI I 


398 


w^jawr^fissm^iT^ A h 

Kf at 

T weft ^«<tf.%»»f 

A& 

;*£rtaEEfe*8? A m 


fi& 


is 


Lo. E. 


R. 



fcM 



TfX.'T 

IrxYr^WTn WM^ fcjrr 5 ^ 

•*T ' 



399 



Ittwm - 
"Jr*— tr 



400 

«<nT3$-H 
TIT ATM 
-ATT WAS: 
AffAHT 
*WTTV^3?H<. 

TTTf^P— 

at mm 

tt m'm 

IT 

mwtttt- 

W^f 


m pa— x 

" mht waakx. 

ASXAMTW 
f'^MIW 
Sg= #<TB^K 


IS 


TTTATT 


TT 7 #W 

TR^ 


20 
U. E. 


t-^rfcSTKp 
WWTOWWS 
HA® MT A 

aatt wmm§ 

tmAmw 


401 - 

‘■•gQ@'>AYTTAT 

hamwwx 

YTM43Rff*.V 
'ATT SA$TA 

'•Jftwff« 


SAAA^xgf 


402 


o. 


mm aw ami 

AAFfgTTTTT^ 












































































































PLATE LIII 




Lo. E. 




10 


<TWf 

**rm 



15 


L. E. 





\ ' Y< 




403 


^(fTrw)W 

tt 

iw7T-<m 'ffXTT 4[ 


a^I^KYT^&. 

tpE ^ 


10 


A/** 4' 


U. E. 


^FAfAfTF^. ' 




404 






405 




10 IX 


TTOCPP^TWrt^- 0T g m 
TMTff 

YAf^fc^gl gp^AF-A 

WMMm a mw &$&- 

Pf« 

&kcy H& feryWT le’ ^ 


<pt 

m 


Lo. E. 



*■ pf > gy%jfc%imm( l 0$ M<x^ 
1M >#&&Tf AH TO ^ 

|*@TTfgt£l 



7M gff>WWlT@Wfe> 

406 


mm 




















































































































































' 
















PLATE LIV 


407 





7 

a ^ w^;nAOA#A^^m 
at a j& %& a a p-tvw 

TffA’8tin- 

T^T fcj Tf k?.as? tr t ?f 

^ ^ Tt W^TAA^Tf & Kfc 
HXATATOT i4A 

*A§ ^iriT <& aka^ wat^. 

»BA A 


409 


%3 




TTT vssr >*4 

TMTfATW^M-^ 

'TTJB^AJSJ^^FfK- 

Ak$A?AAAAA 

<T 


10 
Lo. E. 


AT A 

^AATAAT?- 
A 



o. 


TfTTO^WATf'P: 
YTA^^AA'Y’W 
5 {jfT A AT 0 A A 5 - 
Tf A i^Ate?MA- 
T^msWATA 
-fI^M^AAkW 


,/?. 


/o 





411 


^Arm 7MA 
t 

AAA^^AX^ 

^jjmAAATfA 



























































412 


PLATE LV 


wymww a 

M w TO»r' 

Vi 


"liar 




Tm*J«£HF 
if HtM'Q- 

'»mw 

jgiFfTf 


rf«®e <p[T^ 

413 

ffXTTdl^TtTS tLXf 

tamw feklfcM 


^Ull 




414 


o. 


YYfeYigfHlXWigJ 

Tvfffefj^^vxsr 


omitted by 
scribe 


415 


Z.o. £• 


..Ter^m^: Yfx 

TTfTO^f 

TfZTrW*YftJ 

■Kmfww 



15 


L. eM 





o.m 

Mi 


416 

38tr 

4 ^WWWt 
Hf-T«^aj%^0Y 
IfTWTOoCw 















PLATE LVI 


417 


Lo. E. 



Lo. E. 



























































































m 












































































( 



■ 








Date Due 


r— 

c 

<K 















— 




































































































. 

' 



















































































































PJ3721 .E6D7 
Archives from Erech 


Princeton Theological Semlnary-Speer Library 



1 1012 00027 4417 



*